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What To Expect At 3 Hour Glucose Test

Blood Glucose Test

Blood Glucose Test

What is a blood glucose test? A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucose, a type of simple sugar, is your body’s main source of energy. Your body converts the carbohydrates you eat into glucose. Glucose testing is primarily done to check for type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. Diabetes is a condition that causes your blood glucose level to rise. The amount of sugar in your blood is usually controlled by a hormone called insulin. However, if you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or the insulin produced doesn’t work properly. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. Increased levels of blood sugar can lead to severe organ damage if left untreated. In some cases, blood glucose testing may also be used to test for hypoglycemia. This condition occurs when the levels of glucose in your blood are too low. Watch a great review of the iHealth blood glucose meter » Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and teenagers whose bodies aren’t able to produce enough insulin. It’s a chronic, or long-term, condition that requires continuous treatment. Late-onset type 1 diabetes has been shown to affect people between the ages of 30 and 40. Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed in overweight and obese adults, but it can develop in younger people as well. This condition occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or when the insulin you produce doesn’t work properly. The impact of type 2 diabetes may be reduced through weight loss and healthy eating. Gestational diabetes occurs if you develop diabetes while you’re pregnant. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after you give birth. After receiving a diagnosis of diabetes, you may have to get blood glucose tests to determin Continue reading >>

12 Things Pregnant Women Don't Know About The Three Hour Glucose Test

12 Things Pregnant Women Don't Know About The Three Hour Glucose Test

As new moms, many women are unaware or don't know what to expect about the 3 hour glucose test during pregnancy. Everyone knows what it is. It checks a woman's blood sugar levels. But, do people really think about the process and how difficult it can be for some women? The main concern women have about the glucose test is testing positive for gestational diabetes, which is common during pregnancy. About 1 in 10 women will develop gestational diabetes during their pregnancy, which is why doctors and practitioners screen for this in every patient. For the most part, it starts with a one hour test. Depending on the result, it can last up to three hours, or longer. Women with gestational diabetes are likely to have wonderfully normal pregnancies and healthy babies, they will just have to alter their eating habits and live a healthier lifestyle. Want to learn more about the three hour glucose test? Read below to gain more knowledge about the process and now we will all be aware of what to expect when walking into the doctor’s office between 24-28 week check-up. 12Sugar Sugar Everywhere Diabetes can be genetic or due to a lifestyle factor. When you go to your first prenatal visit and the doctor finds out diabetes run in your family or if your body mass index was 30 or higher before pregnancy, they will test for diabetes. Usually, gestational diabetes is tested between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy and about 1 in 10 women will develop it during their pregnancy. The process is quite simple….sometimes. You’ll drink a syrupy glucose solution. One hour later, you’ll have a blood test to measure your blood sugar level. If your blood level comes out normal, great! The doctor will see you again next visit. If your blood sugar is higher than normal, you’ll need a glucose tole Continue reading >>

What Happens During The 3-hour Glucose Tolerance Test?

What Happens During The 3-hour Glucose Tolerance Test?

What happens during the 3-hour glucose tolerance test? The doctor will check your fasting blood sugar level when you get to his office. Then he'll give you a drink that's even sweeter than the one in the first glucose test. You'll get blood sugar readings 1, 2, and 3 hours later. If two or more of the results are higher than normal, youll be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on January 21, 2017 How can you treat minor skin problems if you have diabetes? THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911. This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information. Continue reading >>

Abnormal Diabetes Test Results

Abnormal Diabetes Test Results

You were just notified that your screening test for diabetes test was high. What does that mean? Finding out your test for diabetes was elevated can be a little confusing or a little frightening. It is important to follow up on any abnormal test for both the health of your baby as well as your own health. Michelle Szymanowski, NP, Gilbert Office, discusses: •Tests to expect •What if you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes •Steps to manage gestational diabetes Tests to Expect If your one hour test was high, your doctor or nurse practitioner may recommend a second test called a 3 hour glucose test. The three hour test is similar to the one hour test, except that you will need to go in to the lab on an empty stomach, and it will take 3 hours to complete the test. During that time, your blood will be tested every hour to see how your body is processing the carbohydrates, or the sugars in your body. Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis? If that test shows that your blood sugars are higher than what we would expect, your doctor or nurse practitioner may diagnose you with gestational diabetes. While hearing that you may have gestational diabetes can be scary, for most people who are diagnosed during pregnancy, this is a temporary condition that will resolve when you deliver your baby. Having gestational diabetes does not mean that you will have diabetes after you deliver and it does not mean that your baby will have diabetes. It does mean that it is important for you to follow up for you testing and to follow the advice of your nurse practitioner or doctor to make sure that both you and your baby remain healthy. While no one is sure of the exact cause of diabetes, we do know that the placenta plays an important role in the development of gestational diabetes. The placenta Continue reading >>

What To Expect From A Three-hour Glucose Tolerance Test

What To Expect From A Three-hour Glucose Tolerance Test

What To Expect From A Three-Hour Glucose Tolerance Test in Pregnant Sass , Sassy Status , Serious Sass After my one-hour glucose screen test showed I was borderline with a result of 132 (the limit is 129), I got a call from my OB telling me I needed further testing. My initial reaction was natural, I believe: I was upset, a bit scared and worried about the consequences of developing diabetes. I read everything I could google on the subject and then worried some more. After a couple of days, I was ready to fight. My diet got another checkup for my Babys sake and I made sure to eliminate unnecessary sugar (goodbye, frozen cake from my surprise Baby shower) as well as made sure my carbohydrate consumption was always accompanied by some sort of protein. I mentally prepared for the three-hour Glucose Tolerance Test and scheduled my appointment. So, heres how it unfolded. I arrived at the testing lab around 10 am and waited for my name to be called. They took me in and drew the first vial of blood, which is to test for fasting glucose. After that, I was given the 100 glucose drink, which was a clear lime-flavored fluid and tasted very much like what I drank for the 1-hour glucose tolerance test. While I enjoyed the drink, the phlebotomist filled out the necessary paperwork and gave me stickers for further blood drawings spaced at 1, 2 and 3 hours. So, for me, it was 11:20, 12:20 and 1:20. I had to watch the clock and time myself, which I think is a bit odd because the lab is administering the test. Shouldnt they give you some sort of a timer to assure the test was properly administered? I wasnt surprised, though, as I had to do the same for my 1-hour test. I simply set my iPhones alarm for the next drawing and settled into a chair for my wait. 1. I was reminded to NOT eat or Continue reading >>

What To Expect From Gestational Diabetes Testing

What To Expect From Gestational Diabetes Testing

What to Expect From Gestational Diabetes Testing What to Expect From Gestational Diabetes Testing Two tests are available to screen for gestational diabetes. Most women will get the oral glucose tolerance test, only following up withgetting the three-hour glucose test if their results are concerning. If you are pregnant, your obstetrician has probably told you that you will need gestational diabetes testing. Don't worrygestational diabetes testing is an important part of routine prenatal care. Most women are tested during weeks 24 through 28 of pregnancy. If you have any risk factors for diabetes, your doctor may consider testing your blood sugar as early as your first prenatal visit. Certain hormones increase during pregnancy, transferring valuable nutrients from the mother to the baby so that the fetus develops and grows. Other hormones block the action of insulin , ensuring that the mother herself does not develop low blood sugar. To compensate, the mothers insulin levels rise. If her insulin levels cannot increase sufficiently, rising blood sugar levels will eventually result in gestational diabetes. Untreated, gestational diabetes can lead to complications for both the mother and the baby. These complications may include: Multiple gestation (twins, triplets or more) Gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Being American Indian or Alaska native, African American, Asian, Hispanic or Pacific Islander Two tests are available to screen for gestational diabetes. Most women will get the oral glucose tolerance test, only following up withgetting the three-hour glucose test if their results are concerning. Why it's Done: The oral glucose tolerance test (also known as the glucose challenge screening) is routine for all pregnant women. It is far from definitive, so don' Continue reading >>

How To Pass Your Three-hour Glucose Test

How To Pass Your Three-hour Glucose Test

So you “failed” your one-hour glucose test, and now you have to do the dreaded three-hour test? Yeah, me, too. I have had to do the three-hour test with two of my pregnancies, and it stinks! How to pass the test. Oh man, I have asked myself this so many times, but the truth is, there is no way to really make it so that you “pass,” unless you really don't have gestational diabetes. Sure, you will find tips around the Internet about what you could do that might help, but in all honesty, trying to do something to get a false “passing” reading on this test is dangerous to your health and the health of your little baby, too! It is important for the test results to be accurate so that if there really is a medical issue, your doctor will know what to do and can treat you properly and watch for the safety of both of you. What you should do. Do exactly what your doctor tells you to do before this test; some of them want you to load up on carbs for a few days before the test, others want you to avoid sugar, and almost all of them will want you to be fasting from midnight until the time of the test in order to make sure that your body is clear of everything. What to expect. At the very least, you should expect to get to your doctor's office with your tummy growling, only to be given another bottle of that yummy glucose syrup (seriously, it's sugar — can't they make it taste better?), which you will drink right after you have your first blood draw. You guzzle down the bottle of glucose and wait a whole hour without any food or drink, get another blood draw, and repeat that same process for three full hours. Some offices have a room for you to go into and sit. It is important that you not overexert yourself between blood draws because it can change the way that your bo Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

TWO-STEP TESTING During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. Your blood will be drawn 1 hour after you drink the glucose solution to check your blood glucose level. If your blood glucose from the first step is too high, you will need to come back for a 3-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose, 100 grams (g) . You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 3 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 3 hours for this test. ONE-STEP TESTING You need to go to the lab one time for a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose (75 g). You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 2 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 2 hours for this test. Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Tests

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Tests

Why do I need a glucose screening test during pregnancy? Most healthcare practitioners routinely recommend a glucose screening test (also called a glucose challenge test or GCT) between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy to check for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a high blood sugar condition that some women get during pregnancy. Between 2 and 5 percent of expectant mothers develop this condition, making it one of the most common health problems during pregnancy. And because the condition rarely causes any symptoms, testing is the only way to find out whether you have it. Like any screening test, the GCT won't give you a diagnosis. Instead, it's designed to identify as many women as possible who may have a problem and need more testing to find out. So a positive result doesn't mean that you have gestational diabetes. In fact, only about a third of women who test positive on the glucose screen actually have the condition. If you test positive on the screening, you'll need to take the glucose tolerance test (GTT) – a longer, more definitive test that tells you for sure whether you have gestational diabetes. Your practitioner may want you to be screened earlier than 24 weeks if a routine urine test shows a lot of sugar in your urine or if you're considered high risk. If the results are normal, you'll be screened again at 24 to 28 weeks. Of course, if you were diagnosed with diabetes before pregnancy, you won't need to be screened. Instead, you'll continue to work with your practitioner to manage your condition during pregnancy. How is the glucose screening test done? When you arrive for the test, you're given a sugar solution that contains 50 grams of glucose. The stuff tastes like a very sweet soda pop (it comes in cola, orange, or lime flavor), and you have to Continue reading >>

Not So Sweet – Glucose Tolerance Test And Gestational Diabetes Information

Not So Sweet – Glucose Tolerance Test And Gestational Diabetes Information

Between 24 and 28 weeks gestation, most OBs and midwives send pregnant woman for the dreaded glucose tolerance test (GTT). This one-hour test is designed to determine who is at risk for gestational diabetes. In this article, I will detail everything you need to know about the test, what gestational diabetes is, and how to read the test results when you attain them. Let’s begin: What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition that affects three to five percent of pregnant women. The placenta, the organ responsible for nourishing the growing baby, produces pregnancy hormones that can interfere with the body’s ability to make or use insulin. In some women, gestational diabetes occurs when the pancreas over produces insulin to accommodate the insulin resistance caused by the placenta. Causing the need to produce up to three times the normal amount of insulin, gestational diabetes puts the woman at risk for a large baby at birth, preeclampsia, premature delivery, and type II diabetes later in life. Her baby will be at risk for hypoglycemia after birth and type II diabetes as it gets older. With proper diet and monitoring, the risks of gestational diabetes can be minimized. What to Expect During the Glucose Tolerance Test Women taking the one-hour GTT will receive a sugary drink with 50 grams of glucose. Three popular flavors of the drink include orange, fruit punch and lemon-lime. Many women describe the taste as flat soda or a melted popsicle. Pregnant women are given five minutes to finish the drink and will not be permitted to eat or drink anything else during the test. A nurse or lab technician will draw blood exactly one hour later. Although many women feel little side effects from the drink, some moms-to-be may get headaches or extreme fatigue fro Continue reading >>

Anyone Have The 3 Hour Glucose Test?

Anyone Have The 3 Hour Glucose Test?

It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. Schedule it for early morning so your fast is overnight. I was expecting to feel really ill because I get nauseous in the mornings when I don't eat shortly after I wake up but I actually felt fine. I wonder if my normal nausea is due to low blood sugar so when they pumped me with glucose I actually felt better! I was definitely hungry at the end and kind of bored from sitting in the waiting room for three hours but it wasn't terrible. Having two blood draws in each arm was a challenge but I have bad veins anyway. Oh, and I passed the 3 hour no problem...I never saw the numeric results just that I passed all four stages of the test which is really common so you have like an 85% chance of passing it too I think. I got that dreaded call that I didn't pass the 1 hour glucose test. My Dr. wants me to take the 3 hour test and I'm really nervous about taking it. I heard awful things about the 3 hour test (getting sick, light headed, passing out ect) and wanted to know what to expect and what your experiences were with it. I have done it twice. Truthfully, the one hour was worse for me both times. My only complaint with the 3-hour was that instead of orange flavor, I got this Hawaiian Punch /Fruit Punch flavored for the "goo". That was hard for me not to Ralph because HP flavor makes me gag. I still can't drink it. I was hungry as all get-out though. So that's the worst I think. I wanted to eat many bovine animals lol. I would also recommend to do it as early as possible! take water and possibly a salty snack you can have once you are done (trust me after all that sugar your not going to want anything sweet for at least 24 hours) also it wasn't that bad I mean you get alittle nauseous but the more water you drink the better.. Ifound w Continue reading >>

3 Hour Glucose Test Failed - Babyandbump

3 Hour Glucose Test Failed - Babyandbump

Hey come on now chin up! I have my GTT tommorow morning and i have like 3+ glucose in my tiddle all the time and i had GD last time so i know the outcome. It is annoying having to test blood sugars etc and watch your food but there are hundreds of women on here that have the same thing. I know for certain that i have it so if you ever need anybody to talk to or just to have a moan to im here One thing that is a positive, you will get offered a sweep at 37 weeks and most likely offered induction from 38 weeks thats 2 weeks less you have to cope with being pregnant hunny. im just worried cause i had hypermeses up til about 15 weeks and food aversions with almost everything. im only just now getting to the point where i can eat and its mostly cereal and mac and cheese right now, i bet those are GD no-nos. so now what am i going to eat and my strong sense of smell is so bad i cant go near my kitchen i can smell all the food and stuff and it makes me gag and throw up so my fiance has to get me most of my meals. when he works what the heck am i going to do. it just dont seem possible and i dont know what to even expect until my appointment tuesday. im having a csection with this one too since my hips are two small to pass a baby through and i have a verticle incision, are they going to take the baby early? i hope i get some extra ultrasounds to check the baby's size cause im worried about that too. i was borderline diabetic and now im afraid i'll be full blown diabetic now even after the baby is born...its all so overwhelming right now i hope i feel better after all is explained at the doctor on tuesday. im just worried cause i had hypermeses up til about 15 weeks and food aversions with almost everything. im only just now getting to the point where i can eat and its mostly Continue reading >>

Pregnancy: What To Expect At The Three Hour Glucose Test

Pregnancy: What To Expect At The Three Hour Glucose Test

So, I’m pregnant and I got the dreaded call that I failed my one hour glucose screening and needed to go in for the three hour glucose test. This hasn’t happened with either of my other two pregnancies, so of course I hit up Dr. Google for a breakdown of how things would go. Here’s what happens… fasting, then four blood draws in three hours. Ouch. I’m not fearful of needles and have had my blood drawn plenty of times during this pregnancy, but my veins are small and often the phlebotomist has trouble either finding a vein or getting enough blood. To help keep my mind occupied, I chronicled how the experience went and what I learned… What to Expect at the Three Hour Glucose Test Thoughts on the way to the test: Instead of drinking straight up glucose concentrate, these tests would be much more pleasant if it were candy you were told to eat. Hour 1, eat a Snickers bar, hour 2 eat a package of peanut butter cups, hour 3 enjoy a bag of Skittles. There should be glucose test clinics that are day spas or nail salons. For a week I’ve been trying to find time for a pedicure. Since I’m literally just sitting here, it’d be nice to kill two birds with one stone. WiFi in the waiting room. I could be working instead of typing this post out on my phone. Hour 1: Blood draw was smooth. Easy peasy. Chug down a high concentrate glucose drink in 5 minutes. Fruit punch as opposed to orange this time. Baby moving around like crazy. He must have been hungry. 30 min in: Feeling nice and light headed. Oy. It’s going to be a long morning. 45 min in: There’s a guy in the waiting room yelling at CNN about a political story that’s on. Praying that he please, please does not come sit next to me. Debating putting my ear buds in. 10 min until next draw: Dizzy, thirsty and bore Continue reading >>

My 3 Hour Glucose Test Disaster

My 3 Hour Glucose Test Disaster

If you’re here, you likely searched for something like: failed glucose test failed 3-hour glucose test what happens when you fail your glucose test what to expect at my glucose screenings sugar shock glucose test throwing up after glucose test And so I say: welcome! (Although I hope that what happened to me doesn’t happen to you!) Since I originally shared this experience, I have gone on to have two healthy, beautiful baby girls (read their birth stories here and here). Despite the dramatic moments I had at the glucose test, please be assured that it’s very uncommon and I recovered after a little rest and relaxation! A quick update on my story. During my first pregnancy, I failed my 1-hour glucose test, which meant I was ordered to undergo a second and more extended test. These glucose screenings are designed to diagnose high blood sugar during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). The first test involves drinking a liquid that contains glucose and after an hour, having your blood drawn to test the sugars. If you fail the first test, you have to do a tolerance test, which involves fasting and then another round of glucose screening with multiple blood draws. So, that brings us back to my experience! I showed up to my 3-hour test armed with my laptop and free wifi to pass the time, so I wasn’t too worried. I fasted and showed up at 8:15am. At 8:30am I was taken back and had my fasting blood sugar level drawn. I was handed the glucola, which was twice as sweet as the previous one, meaning it had 100g of sugar in it. Again, it didn’t taste bad, just syrup-y sweet. This time, I had 10 minutes to drink it and I chatted with the nurse while I sipped away. She told me some interesting facts: How you eat doesn’t necessarily affect your outcome. She has had large women c Continue reading >>

Think Before You Drink: A Closer Look At Glucola

Think Before You Drink: A Closer Look At Glucola

. . . and don’t forget those vegetables. Healthy fats are essential, of course, and don’t skip meals! You dutifully nod your head, and then look down at the bottle of glucola that’s just been handed to you. All of a sudden you’re in a “choose your own adventure” story. Which path will you take? What are the risks and benefits of this test? Today I’m going to share my personal process in deciding whether or to take the oral glucose challenge test (OGCT). Please keep in mind that as I wrote in my posts on the vitamin K shot and Group B Strep, “Best Boo-Boo Kisser South Of Puckett’s Gas Station” is about as official as things get for me professionally. I am not a doctor, this is not medical advice, and your decision is completely up to you. If you need some convincing on this, read my full disclaimer where I say it over and over again. Okay, let’s jump in! What is gestational diabetes? Most doctors say we don’t really know why gestational diabetes happens, but there is a theory out there that makes a lot of sense to me personally, and it’s this: Before modern conveniences like grocery stores, people ate what grew in their backyard. Our ancestors’ staples were sometimes starch heavy (like the maca root consumed by Peruvians), and other times they were more fat and protein-based (like the Inuit). Our bodies do an amazing job adapting to whatever’s available, but there are certain things we all need to thrive. Glucose is a particularly essential nutrient for babies, but in some regions it can be scarce. According to this theory, our bodies adapted to the risk of scarcity by giving our babies preferential access to it during pregnancy. How does that work? As Chris Kresser has observed, “Pregnant women are naturally insulin resistant.” In other Continue reading >>

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