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What To Do If Blood Sugar Is 230

Sugar Level - My Sugar Level Is 230 In | Practo Consult

Sugar Level - My Sugar Level Is 230 In | Practo Consult

My sugar level is 230 in fasting , how can i control my sugar level, kindly give me advice as soon as possible The treatment of Diabetes is not that simple. There are many classes of Diabetic Drugs. It depends on extent of Diabetes and complications to decide medicine for the Diabetic person. Dosages are also decided upon depending on your acute and chronic sugar levels, fasting sugar levels, post prandial sugar levels, urine sugar levels , urine MICROALBUMIN levels, urea and creatinine levels.So , a complete Diabetic profile needs to be done to reach for the best drugs and proper dosages.If Diabetes is not controlled with in few years it cause multiple complications like Eye Vision Problem, Nerves Damage, Sexual Weakness, Heart Diseases, Kidney Disease, foot Complications and reduced blood supply to the brain. Here is the list of Tests, please get them done and follow up with me.I will do the best and give you a proper treatment. 1. HBA1C. 2. SUGAR - Fasting and PP. 3. Urine - Routine and MICROSCOPY. 4. Urine MICROALBUMIN. 5. Urea and Creatinine. 6. Lipid Profile.Follow up with the reports . I will set up a wonderful treatment plan to control your sugar levels.Additionally I will also make a customised Dietary plan for you to take care of your Sugar levels naturally. Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Diabetes is an ancient disease, but the first effective drug therapy was not available until 1922, when insulin revolutionized the management of the disorder. Insulin is administered by injection, but treatment took another great leap forward in 1956, when the first oral diabetic drug was introduced. Since then, dozens of new medications have been developed, but scientists are still learning how best to use them. And new studies are prompting doctors to re-examine a fundamental therapeutic question: what level of blood sugar is best? Normal metabolism To understand diabetes, you should first understand how your body handles glucose, the sugar that fuels your metabolism. After you eat, your digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates into simple sugars that are small enough to be absorbed into your bloodstream. Glucose is far and away the most important of these sugars, and it's an indispensable source of energy for your body's cells. But to provide that energy, it must travel from your blood into your cells. Insulin is the hormone that unlocks the door to your cells. When your blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the beta cells of your pancreas spring into action, pouring insulin into your blood. If you produce enough insulin and your cells respond normally, your blood sugar level drops as glucose enters the cells, where it is burned for energy or stored for future use in your liver as glycogen. Insulin also helps your body turn amino acids into proteins and fatty acids into body fat. The net effect is to allow your body to turn food into energy and to store excess energy to keep your engine running if fuel becomes scarce in the future. A diabetes primer Diabetes is a single name for a group of disorders. All forms of the disease develop when the pancreas is unable to Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 230 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 230 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 230 mg/dl fasting? (or 12.76mmol/l) Blood sugar 230 mg/dl (12.76mmol/l) fasting - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar fasting and the result was 230 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Very High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia / Dangerous) To improve your blood sugar fasting you need to lower your blood glucose level by 130mg/dl. Your fasting blood sugar level should always be below 100mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesnt work correctly, and Continue reading >>

Scared...blood Sugar 230...never Been Diagnosed..awaiting A1c Results.

Scared...blood Sugar 230...never Been Diagnosed..awaiting A1c Results.

Scared...Blood Sugar 230...never been Diagnosed..Awaiting A1C Results. Scared...Blood Sugar 230...never been Diagnosed..Awaiting A1C Results. Hello Everyone, I have a strange story to tell and I was hoping someone out there could answer a nagging question for me or have any insight... I am 32 yrs (male) old with Minimal Change Kidney Disease, been in remission for 3 years now and kidneys are in great shape..have not had any other problems associated with Diabetes nor have i had a diagnosis of Diabetes...had current blood work in mid-October..all good Bp,Urine and everything normal..glucose was 92 and never a mention of being pre-diabetic or anything from my Dr's...just that i could drop a few pounds..now Just on a fluke thing I tested my blood sugar 3 days ago in the AM...had coffee with 2 sugars in it...not even my meter..it's my dads...he got a free meter because his blood glucose upon fasting is typically around 100-120....blood sugar has never been a problem for me as i have had many blood tests due to my kidney disease over the last 5 years and it has always been normal... So just as a fluke thing i tested myself and got a reading of 230..then 2 hours after eating it was 302...now from what i read so far...i should have been feeling strange...but i have no signs or symptoms of Diabetes...my blood sugar the last 2 days Fasting and Non-Fasting has not dropped below 125 at any point..i feel fine and called my Dr. yesterday and he said come in for an A1C..did that this morning..have to wait for results... Now after all that rambling{sorry} my question is...is it possible to go from not even being Pre-diabetic to having numbers that a severely Diabetic individual would have in just over 2 months with no changes in diet or anything?....i do have extreme anxiety and have Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies, Diagnosis And Clinical Management: Sick-day Rules In Diabetes, Case Studies

Diabetic Emergencies, Diagnosis And Clinical Management: Sick-day Rules In Diabetes, Case Studies

Konstantinos Makrilakis, Nikolaos Katsilambros A 28-year-old man with Type 1 diabetes for 12 years is under treatment with long-lasting insulin (e.g., insulin glargine) 26 IU at bedtime and a rapid-acting insulin analog (e.g., insulin lispro) three times a day before each meal (the dose determined depending on the carbohydrate content of the meal and the preprandial blood glucose level. The usual daily dose of insulin lispro is 22-24 IU). His glycemic control is quite good (recent HbA1c: 6.7%). The patient calls his physician in the morning because he has been vomiting all night, has developed abdominal pains, and has a temperature of 38° C (100.4° F). His blood glucose level in the morning was 312 mg/dl (17.3 mmol/L). He was out at a party the previous night and was not able to hold anything down this morning, not even water. The doctor initially asked the patient to check his urine for ketones with a special urine strip (that the patient had been instructed in the past to have at home) and call him back. A few minutes later the patient informed the doctor that the urine test was positive for ketones (2+). Based on the guidelines analyzed above, the doctor recommended the injection of 10 IU of insulin lispro subcutaneously (20% of the total daily dose) and repeat blood glucose measurement and ketones in 2-3 hours. At the same time he asked the patient to try to sip tea slowly (at least one cup every 30-45 minutes), and to call again if urine ketones persisted after 6 hours (or earlier if they increased) or if blood glucose level was persistently higher than 300 mg/dl (16.7 mmol/L), despite the administration of insulin. Two and a half hours later the patient had a blood glucose level of 230 mg/dl (12.8 mmol/L) and urine ketones had decreased to 1+. The tea had been r Continue reading >>

What To Do When Sugar Level Is 230? - Webmd Answers

What To Do When Sugar Level Is 230? - Webmd Answers

Please visit the new WebMD Message Boards to find answers and get support. Were sorry! We are currently experiencing technical difficulties with WebMD Answers Search. All the other links to questions and answers are working, so feel free to browse or visit the Explore tab to find questions and answers by Topic, by Expert Answers, or by Organization Answers. Want to know what people are talking about right now? Don't miss the latest hot topics on WebMD Answers. First, try and keep your question as short as possible. Include specific words that will help us identify questions that may already have your answer. If you don't find your answer, you can post your question to WebMD Experts and Contributors. Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, blogs, or WebMD Answers are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service, or treatment. Do not consider WebMD User-generated content as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

Blood sugar control is a main goal for people living with type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar levels can lead to a variety of complications over time, including nerve damage, heart disease, and vision problems. Blood sugar levels that are too low can cause more immediate problems, such as dizziness, confusion, and potentially a loss of consciousness. Keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible is key to preventing these complications and living well with type 2 diabetes. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Glucose, or blood sugar, comes from two places — the food you eat and your liver. “Blood sugar is basically used to supply energy to the body,” explains Deborah Jane Wexler, MD, an endocrinologist in practice at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. For instance, one of your most valued organs — your brain — runs entirely on glucose, she notes. Insulin is used to move glucose into cells to be used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the blood, leading to high blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar can occur when you take too much diabetes medication, skip a meal, or increase your physical activity. Monitoring your blood sugar — by making sure it doesn’t spike too high or dip too low — is an important part of managing your type 2 diabetes. And you can start by learning the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and steps to take to bring those levels back to normal: Hypoglycemia: If blood sugar is too low — usually below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — you may have symptoms such as confusion, sweating, nervousness, nausea, and dizziness. You could even pass out Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Who Gets Diabetes and How to Manage It Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can lead to serious health complications if left untreated. Several factors, such as body weight, family history and race and ethnicity may increase your risk of diabetes. Diabetes can be effectively managed by exercising and eating a healthy diet. What is diabetes? Diabetes (medically known as diabetes mellitus) is a common, chronic disorder marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, or sugar. It occurs when your cells don’t respond appropriately to insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas), and when your pancreas can’t produce more insulin in response. Diabetes usually can’t be cured. Left untreated—or poorly managed—it can lead to serious long-term complications, including kidney failure, amputation, and blindness. Moreover, having diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. Your body and sugar To understand diabetes, it’s helpful to understand the basics of how your body metabolizes (breaks down) sugar. Most of the cells in your body need sugar as a source of energy. When you eat carbohydrates, such as a bowl of pasta or some vegetables, your digestive system breaks the carbohydrates down into simple sugars such as glucose, which travel into and through your bloodstream to nourish and energize cells. A key player in the breakdown of sugar is the pancreas, a fish-shaped gland behind your stomach and liver. The pancreas fills two roles. It produces enzymes that flow into the small intestine to help break down the nutrients in your food—proteins, carbohydrates, and fats—to provide sources of energy and building material for the body’s cells. It makes hormones that regulate the disposal of nutrients, including sugars. Cells in Continue reading >>

My Sugger Lavel Is 230 Please Suggestion.

My Sugger Lavel Is 230 Please Suggestion.

my sugger lavel is 230 please suggestion. Keep carbohydrate intake between 10 and 14 portions per day (1 portion = 10g carbohydrate), ideally 3 meals x 4 carb portions. uk.sitestat.com/diabetes/we... Make up the balance of your meals with natural, additive-free, unprocessed protein and fat foods. How to measure the intake. Do we people have to carry balance all the time? In India like US things will not be available with prescribed manner on the cover. Giving advise is easy but putting in practice is difficult. Therefore, the answer should be in a clear and transparant way rather than in a vague manner. The text below is a "COPY&PASTE STUFF" from my previous replies to some others. IF YOU HAVE ALREADY SEEN IT, KINDLY IGNORE THIS. ================================================================== Diabetes is a fundamental disorder. It is comparable with low voltage in an electric circuit. In both cases all connected subsystems will under-perform and will fail in due course. It will affect SEX life also, if diab is not contained. Diab impairs the glucose (SUGAR) & oxygen supply to ALL CELLS of the patient. You cannot compensate the resultant weakness with liquor, food or medicines. A DIABETESE PATIENT (also known as A DIABETIC) need NOT starve. PROPER or APPROPRIATE food can be eaten EVEN FULL STOMACH THRICE DAILY! Try to understand diabetes & conquer it. TAKING MEDICINES ALONE WILL NOT BRING DOWN BLOOD SUGAR ALWAYS. YOU HAVE TO CHANGE YOUR FOOD HABITS & LIFE STYLE ALSO TEMPORARILY TILL CURE. I was diabetic from 2006; but NOT diabetic from 2009. I studied Diabetes thoroughly, because it was to solve MY problem. Do you want to see my experience and blood sugar history from 2006 to 2013? Those are reported at: appropedia.org/Diabetes_mel... If you want only MODUS OPERANDI, Continue reading >>

Diabetessisters

Diabetessisters

I have noticed that my blood sugars routinely go up to anywhere between 230-260 after meals even when I take the correct insulin dose. They come back down to normal, but I am really concerned about my blood sugars going this high on a regular basis. I have had diabetes for 19 years and this has never been a problem for me before. Can you tell me what the problem might be and how concerned I should be? (*The question for this week is what to do about excessively high post meal blood sugars in someone who uses an insulin pump and insulin-to-carb ratio. The blood sugars return to normal by the next meal but she discovered these highs while using a continuous glucose monitoring system.) First, it may be a good idea to re-evaluate the insulin-to-carb ratio. My experience has been that over time, whether its getting older or just normally occurring changes for us, we may need a higher insulin-to-carb ratio. If you increase the bolus insulin and then find yourself crashing before the next meal, I would decrease the basal rate. To test the insulin-to-carb ratio, you want start with a normal primal blood sugar, eat an exact amount of carbohydrate and then test one hour and 2 hour post meal. In theory, the blood glucose should not be above ~ 180 mg/dl one hour out and ~140 mg/dl 2 hours out. If it is, I would try increasing your insulin-to-carb ratio and see what happens. Second, many of us are finding that the insulin analogs do not work as fast the companies tell us. In fact, some may need a start up time of ~20- 30 minutes pre meal. I have one patient that takes half of his insulin 30 minutes before eating and than the rest once he sits down to eat and can obviously add more then if he is going to eat more than he planned on initially. This strategy may work better than incre Continue reading >>

Can I Exercise If My Glucose Level Is Above 230 Mg/dl?

Can I Exercise If My Glucose Level Is Above 230 Mg/dl?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can I exercise if my glucose level is above 230 mg/dl? My glucose level falls between 200-250 from Monday till today. Last Sunday I had a match where I had played strenuously. I skipped my morning badminton practise to give my body rest. But the glucose level is high. Can I take do exercise when my glucose level is high? Hello @niyathireme Yes it's a good idea to exercise if you are running your levels high, just of course keep a watchful eye that they don't drop suddenly, a good site for diabetics doing sport is runsweet.com What is the glucose range expected in T1d during fasting and after meals. I could see different dates in different sections in the site @niyathireme 230 is 12.8m/mol. I was told to avoid vigorous exercise if my blood sugar was over 12 so you may want to stick to moderate exercise. Let me tag @daisy1 for you for some basic information. This is a UK site so uses m/mmols. You'll find a helpful converter here: Here is some basic information for you which I hope will be useful. If you need to, ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help. Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist. A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. Its far from the end of the world though and on this forum youll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this. On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes. Carbohydra Continue reading >>

Q&a: How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It’s Over 200 Mg/dl

Q&a: How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It’s Over 200 Mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have Type 2 diabetes. A: An excellent question, but a complicated one to answer. Your doctor or nurse educator should be contacted any time your blood sugar runs consistently higher than 250 mg/dl for more than two days. When a person with Type 2 diabetes encounters a high blood sugar, the strategy used in bringing it down will vary from individual to individual. This is because of the differences in treatment concerning diet, exercise, and medication. It will also depend upon the guidelines for glucose control that you and your doctor have mutually agreed upon. When high blood sugars do occur, there are a number of strategies that can be employed to adjust the glucose level back down to a normal range. These might include: 1) Eating less food at the next meal, eliminating a snack and/or eating foods with a lower glycemic index. A general rule of thumb to follow is decreasing 15 grams of carbohydrate (the amount found in one starch exchange, one fruit exchange, or one cup skim milk exchange) will lower blood glucose by 30 mg/dl. If you test your blood sugar at 182 mg/dl before a meal or snack, then eliminate one starch and one cup milk at the next meal to bring the glucose value as close to 120 mg/dl as a baseline. Although people with diabetes will respond differently to this adjustment, it provides a basic guideline to start with. For persons with Type 2 diabetes who are overweight, the loss of only 5% to 10% of total weight loss can dramatically improve blood glucose values (so just cutting calories moderately can achieve better blood glucose control). Lastly, choosing foods with a lower glycemic index, i.e., foods that do not raise blood sugar as quickly or dramatically, can help to bring blood glucose Continue reading >>

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