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What Should Fasting Blood Sugar Be In The Morning?

Why Are My Morning Sugars Over 300?

Why Are My Morning Sugars Over 300?

Q: I am 23 years old and I have had insulin dependent diabetes for 9 years. My blood sugars during the day are generally under 150 mg/dl, but no matter what I do my fasting blood sugar before breakfast is always high, often over 300. What is going on? A: The problem described above, fasting hyperglycemia (high blood sugar before breakfast), is a common complaint that vexes both patient and physician. Consistently elevated fasting blood sugars are generally due to one of the following: 1. Insufficient insulin taken the night before. 2. Somogyl Phenomenon: with this theory, it is thought that too much insulin is taken in the evening leading to unrecognized hypoglycemia in the middle of the night. The low blood sugar triggers the release of the counter-regulatory hormones (adrenaline, growth hormone, glucagon, cortisol) that increase blood sugar levels. Paradoxically, high doses of insulin taken at night lead to higher glucoses in the morning and lower doses lead to lower blood sugar levels. Although this theory had been accepted for years, currently it is controversial. Several studies have shown that lower glucoses in the middle of the night are actually associated with low glucoses in the morning and the “rebound” described above rarely occurs. This is important in that “normal” fasting glucoses may be at the expense of unrecognized hypoglycemia which can be potentially dangerous. 3. Insulin Waning: in this situation, the insulin taken the evening before has run out by morning, leading to elevated glucoses. This occurs most commonly when NPH is taken in the early evening, at 5-6 pm. This waning is the reason it is often suggested that the evening NPH be taken later at night, generally around 10 pm. 4. Dawn Phenomenon: in this situation, a predawn surge in growth Continue reading >>

What Should My Blood Sugar Level Be In The Morning?

What Should My Blood Sugar Level Be In The Morning?

Diabetes is a silent killer and hence, it needs to be monitored well to keep it under control. With too high or too low blood sugar levels, serious health problems may occur. What needs to be mentioned in case of your diabetes treatment is that unlike most other diseases, diabetes requires the patients to take active participation in its monitoring and management. For that, you need to understand the normal blood sugar level. During different times of the day, the blood sugar levels may differ naturally. The doctor would often ask you to measure your blood sugar level while fasting, i.e. at the morning time and after having breakfast and also at night. Depending on these levels, the diet, the medication and the insulin dose need to be determined. Amongst these, the blood sugar level in the morning is the most important one as it will decide the management plan for the rest of the day. What Should My Blood Sugar Level be in the Morning? The average blood sugar level should be – On waking up (before breakfast): 80 to 120 mg/dL. Before meals: 80 to 120 mg/dL. 2 hours after meals: 160 or less mg/dL. At bedtime: 100 to 140 mg/dL. To keep it simple, on an average, it can be said that the normal blood sugar level for most people is less than 100 mg/dL in the morning, irrespective of the age. This is the fasting blood sugar level in which the person has not had any food, but only water in the last 8 hours of sleep at night and the test is done in the morning. When the blood sugar level is higher than 160 mg/dL after a meal or higher than 120 mg/dL in a fasting condition, it is considered as diabetes. If you are diagnosed with diabetes, it is a must that you monitor your blood sugar level twice a day and also stick to a proper diet that has low to minimum carbohydrate or sugar Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing For People With Pcos And Chronic Stress

Blood Sugar Testing For People With Pcos And Chronic Stress

We take blood sugar pretty seriously ‘round these parts, for a host of reasons. Blood sugar instability (dysglycemia) wreaks havoc on our adrenal glands – those tiny endocrine powerhouses whose overproduction of the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol can greatly impact thyroid function. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can trigger a cascade of hard-to-manage symptoms, including mood imbalance, energy dips, head fog, and insatiable cravings. And while our adrenals are pumping stress hormones, the hypothalamus gets a little distracted from its job spurring thyroid hormone production vis a vis disruption to the hypothalamic, pituitary, thyroid (HPT) axis. Next thing you know, your thyroid has become sluggish. So, yes, we spend a lot of time coaching our thyroid and adrenal clients on how to maintain stable blood sugar and avoid hypoglycemic episodes. (Jill calls these hair-raising episodes “the pit.”) Although low blood sugar can cause short-term concerns for many of us, consistently high blood sugar poses serious, long-term risks. Anyone with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), or people who are in prolonged periods of extreme stress, are at risk for elevated blood sugar, and would be well-served to monitor trends in blood sugar to nip any potential increases in the bud. PCOS is a condition characterized by hormonal imbalance. One such hormone impacted in women with PCOS is insulin, produced by the pancreas to allow our cells to access the energy available from our food. In essence, insulin regulates the amount of sugar in our blood. Women with PCOS are at a particular risk for insulin resistance (meaning that the body’s cells no longer respond as effectively to insulin) and type 2 diabetes. Those conditions, in turn, lead to higher risks of other complicati Continue reading >>

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

If you’re a diabetic, you may find that your blood sugar levels are at their peak in the morning. This is due to the fasting period overnight. It’s common for blood sugar tests to require a period of fasting beforehand to get the best natural levels. You need to get your blood sugar levels down right away. The good news is you don’t necessarily need to rely on medication. While you will want to take medication in the way that your doctor has prescribed, you will still want to follow these seven-morning rituals. It is possible to reverse type II diabetes and focus on a healthier and more natural lifestyle. Even if you’re not a diabetic, you will want to keep your morning blood sugar levels down. Here are the seven must-follow morning rituals that have proven to lower the blood sugar levels on a morning completely naturally. Wait, Why Is Your Blood Sugar Up In the Morning? Why is it that your blood sugar levels will rise overnight? You don’t eat anything, so how can you possibly add any glucose to your system? Well, those who suffer from type II diabetes will find this is most problematic. The body still creates glucose throughout the night. It needs to, whether you’ve eaten something or not. This natural process is called gluconeogenesis, and there is nothing you can do to stop it – nor would you want to. In a healthy person, this process doesn’t cause a major problem. Those with diabetes will find the gluconeogenesis process is increased. That means your body produces more glucose naturally than it would if you were healthy. Let’s not forget that the stress hormone cortisol also plays a part. This increases slowly on a morning until it reaches a peak early in the morning. The cortisol will elevate the blood sugar levels, so you end up with naturally hi Continue reading >>

Is Your Fasting Blood Sugar High Every Morning?

Is Your Fasting Blood Sugar High Every Morning?

I recently had an issue where no matter what I did, my fasting blood sugar levels were always high every morning. They were in the range of between 12 mmol/L to 16 mmol/L. At first I chalked it up to overdoing it around the holiday season. Eating way more carbs than usual, especially late at night and very close to bedtime. I figured that I was off with my bolus for the meals I ate at night. However, after I cut out the extra carbs and still got high readings in the morning, I knew something was off. I realized that every morning religiously, I would wake up between 3 am and 4 am with a high blood sugar. Unfortunately if my blood sugar is above 8 mmol/L I cannot sleep. This problem prevented me from getting good quality sleep. I would often have to correct and monitor before I could go back to bed. I started to analyze my diet and my habits to see where I was going wrong. If you are experiencing a similar issue you can start with the below recommendations. Things to rule out as causes of high fasting blood sugar levels. The main concern is having a high fasting blood sugar for more than 4 or 5 days consecutively. The first step is to eliminate all of the below issues as being the culprit. Sometimes we overlook the simplest or most obvious things. 1. Not taking enough meal time insulin This is the first thing to look into. Make sure that you correctly determine the number of carbohydrates in your last meal of the day and take the insulin to suit. Be sure to also look out for sources of hidden carbs as well. Our bodies react to food and insulin differently at different times of the day. Many individuals including myself have a different carb to insulin ratio at night. I normally have to take a bit more insulin at night especially if the meal is high in carbohydrates(50 gr Continue reading >>

Why All The Morning Highs?

Why All The Morning Highs?

Sometimes diabetes doesn’t make a lot of sense. Think of those mornings when you wake up to find your blood glucose looking as if you’ve been up all night eating cookies. What’s up with that? You’d think that not eating for those seven or eight hours would give you lower blood glucose, right? Such morning highs are common in people with diabetes, but one of the reasons has a particular name: the dawn phenomenon. The dawn phenomenon is a natural rise in blood glucose between 4 and 8 a.m., which happens because of hormonal changes in the body. All people have the “dawn phenomenon,” whether they have diabetes or not. People without diabetes would never notice it happening, as a normal body’s insulin response adjusts for this. However, because people with diabetes don’t have normal insulin responses, they may see an increase in their fasting blood glucose. This is primarily because people with diabetes produce less insulin and more glucagon than they need. The less insulin produced by the pancreas, the more glucagon the pancreas makes as a result. Glucagon, in turn, signals the liver to break down its storage supplies of glycogen into glucose. This is why high fasting blood glucose levels are commonly seen in patients with type 2 diabetes. The effects of dawn phenomenon vary in each person, and your blood glucose may be higher on some mornings than on others. But not to worry—there are steps you can take to get those numbers down and start your days more comfortably in your target blood glucose range. Treatment for dawn phenomenon depends on how you treat your diabetes. If you take insulin, you may be able to adjust your dosing so that peak action occurs closer to the morning rise in your blood glucose. If you have type 2, diabetes pills provide options as Continue reading >>

How Low Is Too Low? Blood Sugar And Hypoglycemia

How Low Is Too Low? Blood Sugar And Hypoglycemia

Keeping blood sugar (glucose) levels from rising too high is the main goal of diabetes care. But glucose levels that drop too low, a condition called hypoglycemia , can be a problem, too. Luckily, the condition is fairly easy to treat if caught early. It's important for people with diabetes to be able to recognize hypoglycemia as soon as the symptoms begin and monitor them. If you find a pattern, where you are having low blood sugars frequently, you should let your health care providers know so that they address and fix the issue. Overview Those most at risk include people with type 1 diabetes (particularly children) and those with type 2 diabetes who are treated with insulin in combination with non insulin injectables or oral medications that stimulate insulin secretion. In addition, elderly people who may not be able to detect low blood sugar are also at risk for low blood sugar. When very tight glucose control is the goal of treatment, as it often is, hypoglycemia is particularly likely. This is especially true early in the course of therapy. It's important to note that hypoglycemia essentially doesn't occur in patients with type 2 diabetes using only dietary control. Causes Hypoglycemia occurs when there is not enough glucose in the blood to provide the body with energy. Several things can lead to this state: Meal skipping Exercise Taking the wrong doses of medications or insulin, or timing them incorrectly Drinking alcohol Kidney disease Weight Loss (can make you more sensitive to your medicine) Healthy Ranges According to the American Diabetes Association, hypoglycemia occurs when blood glucose levels are less than or equal to 70 mg/dL and symptoms are present. If someone with diabetes has a glucose reading lower than 54 mg/dL, this is considered clinically signif Continue reading >>

What Is Ok For A Sugar Level?

What Is Ok For A Sugar Level?

Normal Fasting Blood Sugar Levels Your body uses glucose for energy. When you wake up in the morning after fasting for at least eight hours, your blood sugar should fall between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter, or mg/dL. Levels between 100 and 120 mg/dL in the morning indicate that you have pre-diabetes, a condition that makes it likely that you'll develop type II diabetes in the future, the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse warns. Blood Sugar After Eating What you eat and how much you eat influences how high your blood sugar level rises after eating. If you have a normal blood sugar level, your level even after eating normally won't rise above 125 mg/dL most of the time, according to MedlinePlus. When testing for diabetes, a level of less than 200 mg/dL one hour after ingesting a high-glucose drink or snack and less than 140 mg/dL two hours after ingestion is considered non-diabetic, MedlinePlus also reports. A blood sugar level that is between 140 to 199 mg/dL zero to two hours after ingestion indicates pre-diabetes, however. Diabetic Fasting Levels The American Diabetes Association says diabetics should maintain a normal fasting blood sugar level between 70 to 130 mg/dL. Some diabetics are prone to hypoglycemia, a condition in which blood glucose levels are less than 70 mg/dL. Hypoglycemia can lead to shakiness, sweating, trouble concentrating and loss of consciousness if not treated. If you have a tendency toward hypoglycemia, your doctor might suggest testing your blood sugar level more frequently or changing your diet. Diabetic Levels After Eating Compared to non-diabetics, blood sugar level in diabetics generally rises higher after a meal. According to the ADA, blood sugar level of diabetics should remain less than 180 mg/dL even after eating. If yo Continue reading >>

When “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

When “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

In the last article I explained the three primary markers we use to track blood sugar: fasting blood glucose (FBG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and hemoglobin A1c (A1c). We also looked at what the medical establishment considers as normal for these markers. The table below summarizes those values. In this article, we’re going to look at just how “normal” those normal levels are — according to the scientific literature. We’ll also consider which of these three markers is most important in preventing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Marker Normal Pre-diabetes Diabetes Fasting blood glucose (mg/dL) <99 100-125 >126 OGGT / post-meal (mg/dL after 2 hours) <140 140-199 >200 Hemoglobin A1c (%) <6 6-6.4 >6.4 But before we do that, I’d like to make an important point: context is everything. In my work with patients, I never use any single marker alone to determine whether someone has a blood sugar issue. I run a full blood panel that includes fasting glucose, A1c, fructosamine, uric acid and triglycerides (along with other lipids), and I also have them do post-meal testing at home over a period of 3 days with a range of foods. If they have a few post-meal spikes and all other markers or normal, I’m not concerned. If their fasting BG, A1c and fructosamine are all elevated, and they’re having spikes, then I’m concerned and I will investigate further. On a similar note, I’ve written that A1c is not a reliable marker for individuals because of context: there are many non-blood sugar-related conditions that can make A1c appear high or low. So if someone is normal on all of the other blood sugar markers, but has high A1c, I’m usually not concerned. With all of that said, let’s take a look at some of the research. Fasting blood sugar According to cont Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

How often should I test my blood sugar? This is a very common question, and the answer isn't the same for everyone. In general, you should test as often as you need to get helpful information. There's no point in testing if the information you get doesn't help you manage your diabetes. If you've been told to test at certain times, but you don't know why or what to do with the test results, then testing won't seem very meaningful. Here are some general guidelines for deciding how often to test: If you can only test once a day, then do it before breakfast. Keep a written record so that you can see the pattern of the numbers. If you control your blood sugar by diet and exercise only, this once-a-day test might be enough. If you take medicine (diabetes pills or insulin), you will probably want to know how well that medicine is working. The general rule is to test before meals and keep a record. If you want to know how your meals affect your blood sugar, testing about 2 hours after eating can be helpful. Test whenever you feel your blood sugar is either too high or too low. Testing will give you important information about what you need to do to raise or lower your blood sugar. If you take more than 2 insulin shots a day or use an insulin pump, you should test 4 to 6 times a day. You should test more often if you're having unusually high or low readings, if you're sick, under more stress than usual, or are pregnant. If you change your schedule or travel, you should also test your blood sugar more often than usual. Talk to a member of your health care team about how often to test based on your personal care plan. What should my test numbers be? There isn't one blood sugar target that's right for everyone with diabetes. It's important to work with your health care team to set Continue reading >>

What Is Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)?

What Is Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)?

Do not share your Levemir® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Never inject Levemir® into a vein or muscle. Do not share your Levemir FlexTouch with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. Before taking Levemir®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should ch Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Levels

Blood Glucose Levels

What is the blood sugar level? The blood sugar level is the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It is also known as plasma glucose level. It is expressed as millimoles per litre (mmol/l). Normally blood glucose levels stay within narrow limits throughout the day: 4 to 8mmol/l. But they are higher after meals and usually lowest in the morning. In diabetes the blood sugar level moves outside these limits until treated. Even with good control of diabetes, the blood sugar level will still at times drift outside this normal range. Why control blood sugar levels? When very high levels of blood glucose are present for years, it leads to damage of the small blood vessels. This in turn increases your risk of developing late-stage diabetes complications including: With type 1 diabetes, these complications may start to appear 10 to 15 years after diagnosis. They frequently appear less than 10 years after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, because this type of diabetes is often present for years before it is recognised. By keeping the blood sugar level stable, you significantly reduce your risk of these complications. How can I measure blood sugar levels? Home testing kits come in a variety of shapes and sizes. A pharmacist or the diabetes clinic nurse can advise you about the best model. You can usually obtain a blood glucose meter at little or no cost via the diabetes clinic. Testing strips are available on NHS prescription. You can learn to measure blood sugar levels simply and quickly with a home blood glucose level testing kit. All kits have at least two things: a measuring device (a 'meter') and a strip. To check your blood sugar level, put a small amount of blood on the strip. Now place the strip into the device. Within 30 seconds it will display the blood glucose level. The Continue reading >>

Diabetes The Basics: Blood Sugars: The Nondiabetic Versus The Diabetic

Diabetes The Basics: Blood Sugars: The Nondiabetic Versus The Diabetic

BLOOD SUGARS: THE NONDIABETIC VERSUS THE DIABETIC Since high blood sugar is the hallmark of diabetes, and the cause of every long-term complication of the disease, it makes sense to discuss where blood sugar comes from and how it is used and not used. Our dietary sources of blood sugar are carbohydrates and proteins. One reason the taste of sugar—a simple form of carbohydrate—delights us is that it fosters production of neurotransmitters in the brain that relieve anxiety and can create a sense of well-being or even euphoria. This makes carbohydrate quite addictive to certain people whose brains may have inadequate levels of or sensitivity to these neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers with which the brain communicates with itself and the rest of the body. When blood sugar levels are low, the liver, kidneys, and intestines can, through a process we will discuss shortly, convert proteins into glucose, but very slowly and inefficiently. The body cannot convert glucose back into protein, nor can it convert fat into sugar. Fat cells, however, with the help of insulin, do transform glucose into fat. The taste of protein doesn’t excite us as much as that of carbohydrate— it would be the very unusual child who’d jump up and down in the grocery store and beg his mother for steak or fish instead of cookies. Dietary protein gives us a much slower and smaller blood sugar effect, which, as you will see, we diabetics can use to our advantage in normalizing blood sugars. The Nondiabetic In the fasting nondiabetic, and even in most type 2 diabetics, the pancreas constantly releases a steady, low level of insulin. This baseline, or basal, insulin level prevents the liver, kidneys, and intestines from inappropriately converting bodily proteins (muscle, vital organs) into g Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Sugars Higher Than Postprandial?

Why Are Fasting Blood Sugars Higher Than Postprandial?

Whether you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes or simply monitor your blood sugar levels to track your health, fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels are frequently measured. Since your fasting blood sugar is taken before eating a meal and your postprandial blood sugar is taken after the meal, your fasting level should be lower than your postprandial level. But if the numbers are reversed and your fasting blood sugar levels are higher than your postprandial levels, it could indicate a serious health problem. Know the Norms The American Diabetes Association, or ADA, recommends specific pre-meal and post-meal blood sugar ranges for healthy adults. According to the ADA, fasting blood sugar should fall between 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter of blood. After you eat, this number should increase as your body absorbs sugar molecules from food. However, the ADA recommends that the postprandial blood glucose level stays at or below 180 milligrams per deciliter. Dawn Phenomenon The dawn phenomenon is a medical condition characterized by a blood sugar spike that occurs early in the morning, reports MayoClinic.com. The sugar surge could be related to an inadequate dose of insulin the night before or eating too many carbs before bed. But the spike might also be related to natural body fluctuations that occur during sleep. During the night, newly released hormones might increase your body’s resistance to insulin, which ultimately impacts your body’s ability to absorb sugar into the cells, resulting in high sugar levels in the blood. Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance is a daily problem for people with diabetes. Insulin is responsible for pushing sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells to be used as energy. But when the cells are resistant to insulin’s action Continue reading >>

Managing Morning Blood Sugar Highs: How To Treat The Top 3 Causes

Managing Morning Blood Sugar Highs: How To Treat The Top 3 Causes

A high blood sugar reading first thing in the morning can throw off your whole day — and signal a chronic problem. Despite their best efforts to control their blood sugar levels, some people simply wake up with elevated blood sugar. Starting your day this way isn't just alarming: If it becomes a pattern, high morning readings can make it difficult to achieve your long-term diabetes management goals. Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, a morning blood sugar high can be due to several causes. But with a little detective work and the help of your diabetes care team, you can isolate the cause and take steps to correct it. Here are three common scenarios: 1. The Dawn Phenomenon This occurs during the night while you're asleep and the body releases stress hormones. This phenomenon usually occurs between 3 a.m. and 8 a.m. and involves growth hormone, cortisol, and adrenaline, which trigger the production and release of glucose from your liver. The end result of this chemical cascade is an increase in blood sugar. “These hormones are designed to get us up and moving in the morning,” says endocrinologist Renee Amori, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology at the Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia. While everybody experiences these natural changes in hormone levels, in people with diabetes the body may not adjust appropriately. This can lead to higher-than-normal blood sugar at the start of the day. Testing for these elevated first morning blood sugars is one way to diagnose people with type 2 diabetes. 2. The Somogyi Effect High morning readings can also be caused by the Somogyi effect, a rebound response that occurs when the body overcompensates for a low blood sugar reaction at night. If you take blood sugar–lowe Continue reading >>

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