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What Should Blood Sugar Be After Exercise

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7 Things You Need To Know About Exercising With Diabetes

If there’s one thing people with diabetes know, it’s that regular exercise requires more than just discipline and hard work. Mismanaging your blood sugar, diet and exercise intensity levels can have adverse and unpredictable effects on your body. This month, we spoke with Dr. Jonathon R. Fowles, an exercise physiologist at the Centre of Lifestyle Studies at Acadia University, to help answer some common questions about exercising with diabetes: 1) How often should I exercise? “Regardless of whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the CDA recommends 150 minutes a week of moderate to vigorous exercise,” Fowles says. “You should be combining both aerobic (running, swimming etc.) and anaerobic (resistance training, weight lifting) activity.” 2) What are the benefits? “People with type 2 diabetes can expect to lower their AIC levels after a couple months of meeting the guidelines, and drastically reduce the progression of their diabetes, as well as their cardiovascular risk,” Fowles says. For people with type 1 diabetes, Fowles says the benefits are a little different. “The combination of exercise with insulin can be quite dramatic. People with type 1 diabetes shoul Continue reading >>

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  1. Diligent

    Hi to all,
    Today i went for eye screening then walked to coffee shop afterwards walked to car park then went to peaks shopping had lunch then went home i did my blood sugar and it was 23.7 ugh thought exercise supposed to bring it down not up oh but then i did not have time for breakfast could someone please explain the above as i do not get what has happened with my bs.???????? and why.
    I find it hard to understand the reasoning for the above enlightenment please.
    Diligent.
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  2. Zurich

    Yes, I would like to know also why after I check immediately after exercising I am 10 points higher that when I started ...
    Zurich
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  3. Lanie G

    Don't worry. It's normal. Moderate or strenuous exercise causes the body to release its hormones into the bloodstream as a response so the body can use this energy. A non-diabetic will release small amounts of insulin and this will keep the blood sugar from rising too much. In a type 2, the blood sugar will initially rise, too, but take a longer time to even out eventually - not as fast as a non-diabetic because we don't produce a lot of insulin or maybe we can't use the insulin effectively. So, after brief strenuous exercise, you'll see blood sugar spikes but if you engage in prolonged activity, you'll see the blood sugar come down. I never test after I exercise because I realize this is a temporary spike. This is not a reason not to exercise. Remember that prolonged exercise will help you keep lower blood sugar levels, and help your lungs, heart and circulation. This explanation was restated from Diabetes Solution by Dr. Richard Bernstein.
    Lanie

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Dr Rob Andrews talks about diabetes & exercise - Expert Tips to manage diabetes DURING aerobic exercise with Dr Rob Andrews Paul Coker: Hi. Paul Coker here from 1BloodyDrop.com. On the previous video, I was talking with Dr. Andrews about how you manage your diabetes before aerobic exercise. In this video, I'm with Dr. Andrews, and he's going to be sharing with us how you manage your diabetes during aerobic exercise. Just for those that haven't seen the first video, Dr. Andrews, could you just give us a quick introduction of your phenomenal expertise in diabetes and exercise? Dr. Rob Andrews: I'm Dr. Rob Andrews. I'm a physician who works with people with diabetes in a district hospital, in Taunton. As well as taking care of people who've got type 1 diabetes, I see people who are coming up to do sporting events, such as marathons and things, or people who are doing sports at an elite level, and try and give them advice to help them manage their blood sugars before and during and after. To aid with that, we have a research programme that's run through the University of Exeter that we try and answer questions to make that advice better with time. Paul Coker: Thanks, Rob. The work that

Exercise & Diabetes

While it is possible that exercise helps to prevent diabetes, it is certain that regular exercise benefits most people who already have the disorder. Regular long-term exercise is an important part of diabetes therapy. Not only does exercise promote weight loss and improve cardiovascular health, it leads to better control of blood sugar levels, and less risk of diabetes complications. Ultimately, it may even decrease the need for insulin. It is best to start slowly and gradually build up to at least 25 minutes of aerobic exercise three to five times a week. Walking, cycling, and swimming are excellent activities. Because exercise has such a profound effect on blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity, however, you need to take certain precautions. Here are a few guidelines to help you develop an exercise program: In general, patients with diabetes should not start exercising if blood sugar levels are very high (over 350 mg/dl) or very low (below 60 mg/dl). Keep a record of blood sugar levels, insulin dosages, carbohydrates eaten, and the duration and intensity of the exercise. Choose an appropriate time of day to exercise. If you take insulin, always begin at least one hour after Continue reading >>

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  1. Awesome123

    My blood sugar which is usually in the low 100s spiked to 180 after walking on a treadmill for an hour. What makes blood sugar spike after exercise? Any ideas how to prevent it?

  2. hangry

    It is usually thought that one should check ones BG before Exercise to make sure it does not go to low. What happened to you is probably a liver dump. Besides getting a higher blood sugar right after we ate, our liver will convert fat to sugar when it thinks our body needs it. This is called 'liver dump," and plays a part in the Dawning blood sugar that we so often test when we get up. As we sleep at night, our liver will convert fat to sugar. A normal person will gobble up the sugar, and leave a "normal blood glucose' reading in the morning. A diabetic, as they can NOT correctly utilize the sugar, will find their BG is higher in the morning.
    Another person's story is instructive: When I had a stent a very nice lady came around every fifteen minutes to get my pulse, O2, BP. She told me about what happend to her one day on the job. She had taken her insulin and was working. She hit the floor. She said if she was any place else in the world, she would have died. She immediately had several high priced Cardiologists around her. I think she said her pulse was over 200 and her BG was over 400. She had a "Liver Dump" going on, and it was not slowing down. She had not eaten anything in a number of hours.
    It might be wise to eat something before you start exercising. This is to set the conditions so the Liver is less likely to over do the release of sugar. How much of what is a good question to ask your doc. Likewise I would keep one of those little hard candies in a wrap right next to me while exercising. Although not likely to be of much use if your pancreas has completely thrown in the towel. Many of us have very fatty livers, so this is an issue for many of us, exercising or just going about our day.
    Think of the bright side. In order to lose weight, you have to have the liver convert fat to sugar. Just as long as the BG does not get too high. There is a contradiction here. I used to do some exercise, not enough to really burn off any sugar. And my BG would go down. This is because exercise reduces my insulin resistance, and I start burning off sugar.
    There are some really huge benefits to exercising for a diabetic besides any of this discussion of immediate usage of BG, or Liver Dump. More muscle mass increases how much sugar your body will burn off every day. The other benefits depends on where you are in your diabetes, and may be different for different individuals. I have been told (by a Diabetes Educator) that a diabetic gets more benefit if one exercises in the evening. (?????)
    Bottom line: It might be wise to eat something before you start exercising. This is to set the conditions so the Liver is less likely to over do the release of sugar. How much of what is a good question to ask your doc.

  3. powerwalker2

    Awesome123:
    My blood sugar which is usually in the low 100s spiked to 180 after walking on a treadmill for an hour. What makes blood sugar spike after exercise? Any ideas how to prevent it?
    I've never walked more than 30 minutes at a time on the treadmill. Never had a problem with spiking afterwards. In fact, BG usually goes down. I like to spread my exercise out over several smaller segments during the day and evening. Have been doing it that way for 18 years -- the first 11 of which were with diet and exercise control only. So maybe one solution for you would be to divide your exercise into smaller, but more frequent workouts, and see what kind of results you get that way. Be sure to check pre-exercise as well as post-exercise to get a true picture. And also look at the next morning's fasting BG, where the longer-term effects of the previous day's doings usually show up.

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8 Blood Sugar Questions

We often have the same repetitive questions arise around blood sugar, so we've collected a range of them and put together some short answers below. 1. What should my fasting blood sugar levels after exercise be? Firstly, you may be a little confused here, because your fasting blood sugar is a measurement taken 8-10 hours after you’ve eaten, for example, when you first wake up in the morning. It's strongly recommended that you eat something before you exercise – if you don’t you won't have enough energy to exercise and you also put yourself at risk for hypoglycemia – low blood sugar. Healthy fasting blood glucose levels are between 70-100 (3.9-5.6). Some guidelines say 70-110 (3.9-6.1) and more liberal goals for those who've had diabetes longer are sometimes slightly higher at 70-130 (3.9-7.2). The aim for blood glucose after meals, including after exercise, is below 140 (7.8). Anything below 70 should be treated as hypoglycemia. When it comes to exercise, always check your blood sugar prior to exercising. If it is lower than usual for you or lower than 100 (5.6), have a small snack. If you feel dizzy or shaky after exercise, again, it’s important to check your sugar level Continue reading >>

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  1. SwimsWithAFist

    The other thread on hypoglycemia is a very good, informative thread that people should be aware of. I'm starting this new thread to see if anyone out there has experienced a related situation.
    I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a few years ago. Right around that time (and before I went on glucophage for the diabetes), I came home from practice one night feeling lousy. I checked my glucose level and found it to be 279, which is very high. I continued to test every 15 minutes to half hour to see where it was going and it gradually came down to a normal level. This happened even though I ate a meal after seeing that it was going down (and I felt like I needed food). I never eat for a few hours before a workout, and my glucose levels had been at or near normal for days before this happened.
    After this incident, I started testing immediately before and after a workout and found that my glucose level ALWAYS goes up after a workout, with nothing but water taken in during the workout. I had several times back then where it went over 200. Nowadays it doesn't go that high, but I am taking glucophage now.
    My doctor just shakes her head and says "that's not right, it should go down with a workout". Tell me something I don't know! I saw an endocrinologist that thought that this could be consistent with a delayed insulin response that diabetics have, hence the start of my medication.
    Has anyone else out there seen such a response with their glucose levels?

  2. Conniekat8

    I wonder if dehydration could cause somewhat false test results?
    If there is less water in your blood, then there is an apparent higher concentration of other things in it, relatively speaking.
    Does anyone know how dehydration may affect blood tests?

  3. Conniekat8

    I did a little bit of searching on the net, looks like there is some mention of dehydration affecting blood glucose levels, apparently especially in the type 2 diabetis.
    I found this article kind of interesting:
    http://www.guideline.gov/summary/sum...=1&doc_id=3571
    Perhaps you will be able to find more literature about that with little more in depth search.

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