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What Should A Woman's Blood Sugar Be?

What Are Blood Sugar Target Ranges? What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Are Blood Sugar Target Ranges? What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level?

Understanding blood sugar target ranges to better manage your diabetes As a person with diabetes, you may or may not know what your target ranges should be for your blood sugars first thing in the morning, before meals, after meals, or at bedtime. You may or may not understand what blood sugar ranges are for people without diabetes. You may or may not understand how your A1C correlates with your target ranges. How do you get a clear picture of what is going on with your blood sugar, and how it could be affecting your health? In this article, we will look at what recommended blood sugar target ranges are for people without diabetes. We will look at target ranges for different times of the day for people with diabetes. We will look at target ranges for Type 1 versus Type 2 diabetes. Is there a difference? We will also look at what blood sugars should be during pregnancy for those with gestational diabetes. We will look at other factors when determining blood sugar targets, such as: Age Other health conditions How long you’ve had diabetes for Stress Illness Lifestyle habits and activity levels We will see how these factors impact target ranges for your blood sugars when you have diabetes. We will learn that target ranges can be individualized based on the factors above. We will learn how target ranges help to predict the A1C levels. We will see how if you are in your target range, you can be pretty sure that your A1C will also be in target. We will see how you can document your blood sugar patterns in a notebook or in an “app,” and manage your blood sugars to get them in your target ranges. First, let’s look at the units by which blood sugars are measured… How is blood sugar measured? In the United States, blood sugar is measured in milligrams per deciliter (by w Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

Frequency of hypoglycemia and hypoglycemia unawareness After taking all of these factors into consideration, your doctor will be able to determine what blood glucose targets are best for you. For example, if you are considered to be a healthy, younger individual with diabetes, your blood sugar targets will likely be set to reflect tighter or more rigid blood sugar control. Elderly people with type 2 diabetes may not need to have blood sugar targets so strict because they are at increased risk of having low blood sugars or because they have other health related issues. Women with gestational diabetes have blood sugar targets that are lower than non pregnant people with diabetes to protect the unborn fetus and children with type 1 diabetes have blood sugar targets that are less stringent, especially if they experience episodes of hypoglycemia unawareness. We know healthy eating is key to help manage diabetes, but that doesn't make it easy. Our free nutrition guide is here to help. Sign up and receive your free copy! The table below compares the general recommendations of the two sets of guidelines for both blood glucose pre and post meals as well as hemoglobin A1C (three month average of blood sugar). Plasma blood glucose and A1C goals from the ADA and ACE for most non pregnant adults A Good Way to Determine Your Blood Sugar Levels is Self Blood Glucose Monitoring (SBGM)? Checking your blood glucose levels throughout the day will help you to figure out how to keep your blood sugar in good control. Your numbers can help you pattern manage and learn how to identify how food, exercise, stress, and illness, to name a few, affects your blood sugar control. First thing in the morning (when you are fasting for at least 8 hours) before breakfast, two hours after a meal and befor Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

The aim of diabetes treatment is to bring blood sugar (“glucose”) as close to normal as possible. What is a normal blood sugar level? And how can you achieve normal blood sugar? First, what is the difference between “sugar” and “glucose”? Sugar is the general name for sweet carbohydrates that dissolve in water. “Carbohydrate” means a food made only of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. There are various different kinds of sugars. The one our body uses most is called “glucose.” Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies. Then we can use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. When people talk about “blood sugar,” they mean “blood glucose.” The two terms mean the same thing. In the U.S., blood sugar is normally measured in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dl). A milligram is very little, about 0.00018 of a teaspoon. A deciliter is about 3 1/3 ounces. In Canada and the United Kingdom, blood sugar is reported in millimoles/liter (mmol/L). You can convert Canadian or British glucose levels to American numbers if you multiply them by 18. This is useful to know if you’re reading comments or studies from England or Canada. If someone reports that their fasting blood glucose was 7, you can multiply that by 18 and get their U.S. glucose level of 126 mg/dl. What are normal glucose numbers? They vary throughout the day. (Click here for a blood sugar chart.) For someone without diabetes, a fasting blood sugar on awakening should be under 100 mg/dl. Before-meal normal sugars are 70–99 mg/dl. “Postprandial” sugars taken two hours after meals should be less than 140 mg/dl. Those are the normal numbers for someone w Continue reading >>

What Is The Normal Range For Blood Sugar Levels, And What Blood Sugar Level Constitutes A True Emergency?

What Is The Normal Range For Blood Sugar Levels, And What Blood Sugar Level Constitutes A True Emergency?

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. What Is The Normal Range For Blood Sugar Levels, And What Blood Sugar Level Constitutes A True Emergency? CLINICAL RESEARCH AT JOSLIN DIABETES CENTER, Question:What is the normal range for blood sugar levels, and what blood sugar level constitutes a true emergency? Answer:Now, in a normal individual we measure blood sugar under different circumstances. What we call fasting blood sugar or blood glucose levels is usually done six to eight hours after the last meal. So it's most commonly done before breakfast in the morning; and the normal range there is 70 to 100 milligrams per deciliter. Now when you eat a meal, blood sugar generally rises and in a normal individual it usually does not get above a 135 to 140 milligrams per deciliter. So there is a fairly narrow range of blood sugar throughout the entire day. Now in our diabetic patients we see both low blood sugar levels that we call hypoglycemia, or elevated blood sugars, hyperglycemia. Now, if the blood sugar drops below about 60 or 65 milligrams per deciliter, people will generally get symptoms, which are some shakiness, feeling of hunger, maybe a little racing of the heart and they will usually be trenchant or if they eat something, it goes away right away. But if blood sugar drops below 50 and can get down as low as 40 or 30 or even 20, then there is a progressive loss of mental function and eventually unconsciousness and seizures. And of course that is very dangerous and a medical emergency. On the other side, if blood sugar gets up above 180 to 200, then it exceeds the capacity of the kidneys to reabsorb the glucose and we begin to spill glucose into the urine. And if it gets way up high, up in the 400s or even 500s, it can be associa Continue reading >>

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

Blood glucose control is key to having a healthy baby A diagnosis of gestational diabetes can cast a shadow over the joys of pregnancy. While the vast majority of these cases end with a healthy baby and mom, gestational diabetes (high blood glucose during pregnancy in a woman who has never had type 1 or type 2 diabetes) does increase risks to the health of both baby and mother. Keeping blood glucose under control is crucial for women with gestational diabetes to help safeguard their babies and themselves. Gestational diabetes is caused by issues that arise as part of a normal pregnancy: hormonal changes and weight gain. Women whose bodies can't compensate for these changes by producing enough of the hormone insulin, which ushers glucose from the blood into cells to produce energy, develop high blood glucose and gestational diabetes. Overweight mothers are at a greater risk for the condition. In the United States, gestational diabetes is reported in somewhere between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies, but it is now believed that the condition affects 18 percent of women in pregnancy. The larger number is the result of new criteria for diagnosis, not just skyrocketing rates. The American Diabetes Association began recommending this year that gestational diabetes be diagnosed with only one abnormal test result rather than two, the previous method, and this is causing more cases to be detected. Gestational diabetes usually appears roughly halfway through pregnancy, as the placenta puts out large amounts of "anti-insulin" hormones. Women without known diabetes should be screened for gestational diabetes 24 to 28 weeks into their pregnancies. (If high blood glucose levels are detected earlier in pregnancy, the mother-to-be may actually have type 2 diabetes, rather than gestati Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Readings

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Readings

www.CardioSmart.org What is a blood sugar reading? A blood sugar reading shows how much sugar, or glucose, is in your blood. A test of your blood sugar may be done to: • Check for diabetes. • See how well diabetes treatment is working. • Check for diabetes that occurs during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). • Check for low or high blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). What are normal blood sugar readings? There are several types of blood sugar tests. Normal results can vary from lab to lab. Talk with your doctor about what any abnormal results might mean, and about any symptoms and other health problems you have. Normal values for adults who do NOT have prediabetes or diabetes Less than or equal to 100 When you have not eaten (fasting blood sugar): Less than 140 if you are age 50 or younger; less than 150 if you are age 50 to 60; less than 160 if you are age 60 and older 2 hours after eating (postprandial): Levels vary depending on when and how much you ate at your last meal. In general: 80 to 120 beforemeals or when waking up; 100 to 140 at bedtime. Random (casual): Target values for nonpregnant adults who have prediabetes or diabetes 80 to 130When you have not eaten (fasting blood sugar): Less than 1802 hours after eating (postprandial): What causes abnormal blood sugar? High blood sugar can be caused by: • Diabetes or prediabetes. • Certain medicines, such as corticosteroids. Low blood sugar can be caused by: • Certain medicines, especially those used to treat diabetes. • Liver disease, such as cirrhosis. Rarely, high or low blood sugar can be caused by other medical problems that affect hormone levels. Prediabetes and diabetes Blood sugar helps fuel your body. Normally, your blood sugar rises slightly af Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Glucose Levels: What They Mean, And What They Should Be

Blood Sugar And Glucose Levels: What They Mean, And What They Should Be

Blood sugar and glucose levels: what they mean, and what they should be Sugar is a carbohydrate found naturally in foodCredit:Getty Your blood sugar levelis in constant flux, depending on what you've eaten, when you ate it, and what you did afterwards. A finger-prickblood test can ascertain your levelat any moment in the day it's acrucial tool for diabetes sufferers, as they need to manage their body's insulin response. In people with diabetes, explains Dr Soon Song, a consultant physician and diabetologist at BMI Thornbury Hospital in South Yorkshire and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, the blood glucose levels are raised bothbefore andaftera meal. In a healthy individual without diabetes, he says, the body produces the correct amount of insulin from the pancreas to normalise the blood glucose level. But in diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin and/or the body is not able to use the glucose effectively due to lack of responsiveness to insulin action (known as insulin resistance). So the blood glucose level rises to abnormally high levels, which puts pressure on the bodys organs and nerves. causing permanent damage. Sugar is a carbohydrate found naturally in food. There are different types of sugars: glucose belongs to a type of sugar calledmonosaccharides or simple sugar. It is the primary source of energy and the body tissues needglucose tofunction normally, especially the brain. The terms blood sugar and blood glucose are often usedinterchangeably and refer to the amount of glucose carried in the blood, says Dr Song. The best diet plans to lose weight healthily Blood sugar level refers to the amount of glucose in the blood, sometimes known as blood glucose; the concentration of glucose in the blood is expressed in mmol/l. In health Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels For Adults With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels For Adults With Diabetes

Each time you test your blood sugar, log it in a notebook or online tool or with an app. Note the date, time, results, and any recent activities: What medication and dosage you took What you ate How much and what kind of exercise you were doing That will help you and your doctor see how your treatment is working. Well-managed diabetes can delay or prevent complications that affect your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes doubles your risk for heart disease and stroke, too. Fortunately, controlling your blood sugar will also make these problems less likely. Tight blood sugar control, however, means a greater chance of low blood sugar levels, so your doctor may suggest higher targets. Continue reading >>

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

Normal blood sugar levels are less than 100 mg/dL after not eating (fasting) for at least eight hours. And they're less than 140 mg/dL two hours after eating. During the day, levels tend to be at their lowest just before meals. For most people without diabetes, blood sugar levels before meals hover around 70 to 80 mg/dL. For some people, 60 is normal; for others, 90 is the norm. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: "Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2." American Diabetes Association: "Checking Your Blood Glucose;" "Type 2 Diabetes Complications;" and ''National Diabetes Fact Sheet 2011.'' Robertson, R. 2003. Diabetes, Brownlee, M. 1994. Diabetes, Wautier, J. 1994. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, Christiansen, J. "What Is Normal Glucose?" presentation at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting, September 13, 2006. Fuller, J. 1980. Lancet, Riddle, M. 1990. Diabetes Care, Rao, S. 2004. American Family Physician, Cryer, P. 1993. American Journal of Physiology, Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on December 19, 2017 National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: "Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2." American Diabetes Association: "Checking Your Blood Glucose;" "Type 2 Diabetes Complications;" and ''National Diabetes Fact Sheet 2011.'' Robertson, R. 2003. Diabetes, Brownlee, M. 1994. Diabetes, Wautier, J. 1994. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, Christiansen, J. "What Is Normal Glucose?" presentation at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting, September 13, 2006. Fuller, J. 1980. Lancet, Riddle, M. 1990. Diabetes Care, Rao, S. 2004. American Family Physician, Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

Blood sugar, or glucose, is an important source of energy and provides nutrients to your body's organs, muscles and nervous system. The body gets glucose from the food you eat, and the absorption, storage and production of glucose is regulated constantly by complex processes involving the small intestine, liver and pancreas. Normal blood sugar varies from person to person, but a normal range for fasting blood sugar (the amount of glucose in your blood six to eight hours after a meal) is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter. For most individuals, the level of glucose in the blood rises after meals. A normal blood-sugar range after eating is between 135 and 140 milligrams per deciliter. These variations in blood-sugar levels, both before and after meals, are normal and reflect the way that glucose is absorbed and stored in the body. After you eat, your body breaks down the carbohydrates in food into smaller parts, including glucose, which can be absorbed by the small intestine. As the small intestine absorbs glucose, the pancreas releases insulin, which stimulates body tissues and causes them to absorb this glucose and metabolize it (a process known as glycogenesis). This stored glucose (glycogen) is used to maintain healthy blood-sugar levels between meals. When glucose levels drop between meals, the body takes some much-needed sugar out of storage. The process is kicked off by the pancreas, which releases a hormone known as glucagon, which promotes the conversion of stored sugar (glycogen) in the liver back to glucose. The glucose is then released into the bloodstream. When there isn't enough glucose stored up to maintain normal blood-sugar levels, the body will even produce its own glucose from noncarbohydrate sources (such as amino acids and glycerol). This pro Continue reading >>

Are My Blood Glucose Levels Normal?

Are My Blood Glucose Levels Normal?

I recently had a blood test for sugar content after fasting. The glucose level was 6.3, but I am not sure how this equates with your measurements give... I recently had a blood test for sugar content after fasting. The glucose level was 6.3, but I am not sure what this means. Am I right in assuming that a normal level after fasting for 12 hours is between 4.2 and 6.2, (which presumably means I am on the diabetes borderline)? I wonder why you decided to check your fasting glucose level . Do you have a family history of diabetes ? Perhaps you are taking medication, such as a steroid, that can bring on diabetes? We diagnose diabetes mellitus on the criteria of fasting blood glucose level in excess of 7.7 mmol/litre or non-fasting levels above 11.1mmol/litre. However, the body may develop a reduced ability to handle glucose some for time before diabetes manifests. This probably occurs as people become obese and thereby become resistant to the effects of their own insulin which lowers blood glucose. A fasting glucose between 6.0 to 7.7mmol/L falls within the range that doctors would suspect 'impaired glucose tolerance'. We would follow-up your case to discuss your full medical and family history, then arrange for a repeat test called a modified glucose tolerance test. We would also discuss lifestyle and diet since I note that you are a bit heavier than the ideal for your height. Almost all 'maturity-onset' non-insulin diabetes ( Type 2 diabetes non-insulin dependent diabetes ) is related to increasing obesity. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Tweet Understanding blood glucose level ranges can be a key part of diabetes self-management. This page states 'normal' blood sugar ranges and blood sugar ranges for adults and children with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and blood sugar ranges to determine people with diabetes. If a person with diabetes has a meter, test strips and is testing, it's important to know what the blood glucose level means. Recommended blood glucose levels have a degree of interpretation for every individual and you should discuss this with your healthcare team. In addition, women may be set target blood sugar levels during pregnancy. The following ranges are guidelines provided by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) but each individual’s target range should be agreed by their doctor or diabetic consultant. Recommended target blood glucose level ranges The NICE recommended target blood glucose levels are stated below for adults with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and children with type 1 diabetes. In addition, the International Diabetes Federation's target ranges for people without diabetes is stated. [19] [89] [90] The table provides general guidance. An individual target set by your healthcare team is the one you should aim for. NICE recommended target blood glucose level ranges Target Levels by Type Upon waking Before meals (pre prandial) At least 90 minutes after meals (post prandial) Non-diabetic* 4.0 to 5.9 mmol/L under 7.8 mmol/L Type 2 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L under 8.5 mmol/L Type 1 diabetes 5 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L Children w/ type 1 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L *The non-diabetic figures are provided for information but are not part of NICE guidelines. Normal and diabetic blood sugar ranges For the majority of healthy ind Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

What Is The Ideal Blood Sugar For A 44 Years Old Female?

What Is The Ideal Blood Sugar For A 44 Years Old Female?

For a non-diabetic person of any sex and age (excepting newborns) the optimum fasting blood glucose is 70–90/100 mg/dL and after meals it should not go over 120/140 mg/dL. If you are diabetic the optimum glucose may vary, trying to achieve a “perfect” blood glucose may be unrealistic, or worse, put you in risk of a serious hypoglycemia (depending on which drugs for diabetes are you on). You should ask your doctor, who knows your personal circumstances better, but for most diabetic people who have a moderate hypoglycemia risk a fasting glucose of 80–110 and not over 160 after meals should be acceptable (it’s a bit too high for most pregnant diabetic women though). But if you have a high hypo risk, your target should may be a little higher (say 100–120 and <180) Normal values : fasting state upto 100mg per dl Post prandial (aftr food) : upto 140 mg per dl If >100 and <126 in fasting and if >140 and <200 after food , it is called impaired glucose tolerance or pre diabetic state. Anything >126 in fasting and >200 in RBS or aftr food, checked on two occasions along with clinical symptoms aid in diagnosis of diabetes mellitus Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Women Over The Age Of 40?

How Does Diabetes Affect Women Over The Age Of 40?

Diabetes affects how your body processes glucose, which is a type of sugar. Glucose is important for your overall health. It serves as a source of energy for your brain, muscles, and other tissue cells. Without the right amount of glucose, your body has trouble functioning properly. Two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Five percent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body can’t produce insulin. With proper treatment and lifestyle choices, you can still lead a healthy life. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in people who are younger than 40. The majority of people who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common than type 1 diabetes. Your risk of developing it increases as you age, especially after age 45. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body is insulin resistant. This means it doesn’t use insulin efficiently. Over time, your body can’t produce enough insulin to maintain consistent blood glucose levels. A number of factors can contribute to type 2 diabetes, including: genetics poor lifestyle habits excess weight high blood pressure Diabetes affects men and women in different ways. Women with diabetes are at higher risk of: heart disease, which is the most common complication of diabetes blindness depression If you’re diagnosed with diabetes, you can take steps to manage your blood sugar and lower your risk of complications. This can include eating a well-balanced diet, exercising regularly, and following your doctor’s prescribed treatment plan. The symptoms typically develop more slowly in type 2 diabetes than type 1 diabetes. Watch out for the following symptoms: fatigue extreme thirst increased urination blu Continue reading >>

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