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What Not To Eat The Night Before A Glucose Test

Best Foods To Eat The Night Before A Glucose Screening Test To Avoid A False Positive?

Best Foods To Eat The Night Before A Glucose Screening Test To Avoid A False Positive?

Best foods to eat the night before a Glucose Screening test to avoid a false positive? I'm quite a ways away from this test, I've just been thinking about it, and I was wondering if there are particular foods to stay away from to avoid a false postitive on the 1-hr test (I would hate to go back for the 3 hr and get pricked 4 times!). You should be fine with whatever you eat the night before, by the time you take the test the next day your levels will be "normal" (whatever normal is for you) so you should have an accurate reading. If you are very concerned about it, ask your Doctor. You do fast the morning of the test, and I was warned that it includes gum, breath mints, candies, etc... stick to water that morning before the test, just in case. Hey hey, The best way to lower my A1C that I have ever found is using Tims diabetes fix (i found it on google) Without a doubt the most incredible step by step plan that I have ever tried. Source(s): I Cured My Diabetes - Source(s): Cure Diabetes At Home - How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer. Best foods to eat the night before a Glucose Screening test to avoid a false positive? I'm quite a ways away from this test, I've just been thinking about it, and I was wondering if there are particular foods to stay away from to avoid a false postitive on the 1-hr test (I would hate to go back for the 3 hr and get pricked 4 times!). Source(s): foods eat night glucose screening test avoid false positive: Just dont eat/drink anything sweet that morning. except of course the glucose drink that they give you. my sister actually failed the test and got a false pos. with one of her kids(she has 4) b/c she had something sweet that morning(she forgot she was having the test until right before it) so she ha Continue reading >>

How To Pass Your Three-hour Glucose Test

How To Pass Your Three-hour Glucose Test

So you “failed” your one-hour glucose test, and now you have to do the dreaded three-hour test? Yeah, me, too. I have had to do the three-hour test with two of my pregnancies, and it stinks! How to pass the test. Oh man, I have asked myself this so many times, but the truth is, there is no way to really make it so that you “pass,” unless you really don't have gestational diabetes. Sure, you will find tips around the Internet about what you could do that might help, but in all honesty, trying to do something to get a false “passing” reading on this test is dangerous to your health and the health of your little baby, too! It is important for the test results to be accurate so that if there really is a medical issue, your doctor will know what to do and can treat you properly and watch for the safety of both of you. What you should do. Do exactly what your doctor tells you to do before this test; some of them want you to load up on carbs for a few days before the test, others want you to avoid sugar, and almost all of them will want you to be fasting from midnight until the time of the test in order to make sure that your body is clear of everything. What to expect. At the very least, you should expect to get to your doctor's office with your tummy growling, only to be given another bottle of that yummy glucose syrup (seriously, it's sugar — can't they make it taste better?), which you will drink right after you have your first blood draw. You guzzle down the bottle of glucose and wait a whole hour without any food or drink, get another blood draw, and repeat that same process for three full hours. Some offices have a room for you to go into and sit. It is important that you not overexert yourself between blood draws because it can change the way that your bo Continue reading >>

Baby Bargains & Baby 411 Community

Baby Bargains & Baby 411 Community

Do NOT eat any sweets before 1 hour glucose! Argh. My directions before the 1 hr glucose test stated to fast after midnight if I wanted to be really careful. I ate ice cream after dinner the night before, and failed the 1 hour test. The cutoff point is 140 (140 what, I don't know), and I got a 158. I had no problems with my first pregnancy. So, I had to take the 3 hour glucose test. I was STARVING, lightheaded, and dizzy, had to drink the nasty orange soda (sugar concentration twice as high), and my results came back....NEGATIVE. Like, below negative. In the 80s. Damn. So for those of you who have ice cream temptations like myself, save yourself and don't do it! My doctor didn't tell me to fast, but did recommend eating protien for breakfast - such as eggs, bacon and cheese. NO fruit or carbs! My doctor didn't tell me to fast, but did recommend eating protien for breakfast - such as eggs, bacon and cheese. NO fruit or carbs! I have the same instructions from my doc and it's worked the last 2x for me. I'm so sorry that you had to take the 3 hour OP!! I think the disparity in how one hour tests are administered is one of the most frustrating and bizarre things. There have been a couple of threads here in the last few months on this topic. I had to take mine early and I think my instructions were "eat a normal dinner the night before and a small breakfast and wait x amount of hours before coming in. I fasted and ate only a handful of almonds and tested 2 or 3 hours later and still failed. But I passed my three hour with flying colors. I think alot of women fail the one hour and pass the three hour. And yes, the three hour test feels like torture. When I was there, one woman left to vomit and another passed out on her blood draw. IMO the one hour test is just not very reli Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes is a major health problem in America today. Normally, sugars and starches (carbohydrates) are metabolized for use by the body by the chemical insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. If the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, the carbohydrates cannot be used and the level increases in the blood. The carbohydrate that is tested and found in the blood is glucose. Excess glucose in the blood leads to the diagnosis of diabetes. If diabetes is not adequately controlled by diet or insulin injections, complications can occur, such as increases in infections and damage to blood vessels. GESTATIONAL DIABETES When a woman is pregnant, she must share her carbohydrates with the growing baby. The pregnancy hormones can interfere with the ability of the mother's insulin to regulate carbohydrates. In a small percentage of pregnant women (3-12%), the insulin response is very reduced and the blood glucose levels become abnormally high, causing gestational diabetes (diabetes in pregnancy). For the mother, this can mean increased risk of infections or increased chance of a Cesarean section delivery. Following delivery of the baby, the mother's system returns to normal. In addition to problems for the mother, her baby may also suffer from diabetes. Depending upon the blood levels of glucose during the pregnancy, the baby may grow excessively large, causing difficulties at delivery. Additionally, the baby may have temporary difficulty controlling its glucose and calcium at birth. If the mother's blood sugar remains elevated throughout her pregnancy, the baby has increased risk of stillbirth. DETECTING GESTATIONAL DIABETES Gestational diabetes is most often encountered in late pregnancy. In the past, screening for this disease was based on clues such as a family history o Continue reading >>

New Guidelines Simplify Cholesterol Tests: No Fasting Needed

New Guidelines Simplify Cholesterol Tests: No Fasting Needed

I’m supposed to have my cholesterol checked soon. It’s a simple test, but I’m not looking forward to it since it requires fasting overnight. And that means making a special early-morning trip to my doctor’s office. But new international guidelines say it’s OK — even preferred — to skip the overnight fast. To learn more about this small but oh-so-useful shift, I talked with cardiologist Dr. Samia Mora. She helped write the new guidelines, which were published this week in the European Heart Journal and summarized in JAMA Internal Medicine. Mora is director of the Center for Lipid Metabolomics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. What was the point of fasting before having a cholesterol test? Not eating for eight to 12 hours before having blood drawn for a cholesterol test was thought to give a more accurate assessment of total cholesterol, harmful LDL cholesterol, protective HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides, a type of fat-carrying particle. We now know better. One problem with fasting is that we spend most of the day in the nonfasting state, so the way cholesterol tests are currently done doesn’t necessarily give a clear picture of “normal” levels. Another is that fasting is a hassle for everyone concerned — patients, clinicians, and even lab workers. What’s behind the new recommendation? This change has been coming for some time. It is driven by data from a dozen-plus studies that include more than 300,000 people whose cholesterol and other lipids were measured when they hadn’t fasted. Their levels predicted cardiovascular risk, as well as, or possibly better than, fasting lipid levels. Nonfasting levels might be better? After you eat, your digestive system converts some of the carbo Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Fasting Before A Blood Test: What You Need To Know

Fasting Before A Blood Test: What You Need To Know

By Lana Burgess Fasting before a blood test is when people are asked not to eat or drink anything other than water before some blood tests. But which blood tests require fasting and how can people fast safely? Fasting is not always necessary before a blood test, but when it is, it is only for a short time. Even so, the idea of not eating or drinking, even for a small amount of time, can seem daunting. Understanding when and how to fast before a blood test can help to reduce unnecessary worry. This article explores the types of blood tests that require fasting, why fasting is needed, and how a person can do it safely. Contents of this article: When should you fast before a blood test? Whether someone needs to fast or not before a blood test depends on the type of blood test they are having. Some blood tests require fasting to be effective, while others do not. The types of blood test that require fasting are as follows: Fasting blood glucose test Diabetes is a condition that can lead to there being too much sugar in the blood. A fasting blood glucose test measures levels of sugar in the blood to see if they are healthy. It is important that a person has not had anything to eat or drink other than water for 8 to 10 hours before a fasting blood glucose test. Fasting helps ensure that the blood test records an accurate measure of fasting blood sugar levels. The results help a doctor to diagnose or rule out diabetes. Blood cholesterol tests Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood. High cholesterol can lead to an increased risk of certain health conditions. Blood cholesterol tests, also known as lipid profiles, assess the quantities of fats in the blood. The different fats tested for include: HDL cholesterol, also known as "good cholesterol" LDL cholesterol, also known Continue reading >>

Gtt Test | Netmums

Gtt Test | Netmums

hi everyone i have to get my GTT test done in the morning but in my letter it doesnt say if i need to fast or if i can eat in the morn before it.does anyone know?its the 2hour test and i know i can only drink water but it doesnt mention anything about eating xx i have to get my GTT test done in the morning but in my letter it doesnt say if i need to fast or if i can eat in the morn before it.does anyone know?its the 2hour test and i know i can only drink water but it doesnt mention anything about eating xx I had mine done about 12 weeks ago and agilely remember not being able to eat from about 8pm night before. You can drink coffee/tea without sugar or milk and obviously water. However, it may vary in diff areas. Hope this helps :) xxx I had mine done about 12 weeks ago and agilely remember not being able to eat from about 8pm night before. You can drink coffee/tea without sugar or milk and obviously water. However, it may vary in diff areas. It is a fasting test so no food after midnight. That is what my letter said when i had mine end of dec It is a fasting test so no food after midnight. That is what my letter said when i had mine end of dec Mine was fasting 12 hours before (10-10 in my case). I had the fasting blood test done, drank the lucozade, sat around for 2 hours then had the follow up blood done and then raided their vending machines ;) Mine was fasting 12 hours before (10-10 in my case). I had the fasting blood test done, drank the lucozade, sat around for 2 hours then had the follow up blood done and then raided their vending machines thanks for getting back to me so quickly ladies :)I just wasnt sure if i was allowed to eat or not :) the test is at 9am so im sure i will be ok until afterward xx thanks for getting back to me so quickly ladies I just wasnt Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

A glucose tolerance test can show when the body can't manage blood sugar (glucose) levels well but not yet to the stage of diabetes. What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test checks how well the body processes blood sugar (glucose). It involves comparing the levels of glucose in the blood before and after drinking a sugary drink. The results of this test can help doctors to detect type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance). It is also used to help diagnose diabetes in pregnancy. How does a glucose tolerance test work? In most people a simple blood test is enough to detect diabetes. However, some people have 'borderline' results on routine blood tests and then a glucose tolerance test may help. Also, a glucose tolerance test can show when the body can't manage blood sugar (glucose) levels well but not yet to the stage of diabetes. This is known as pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance) and is a condition that can lead to diabetes. In healthy people, glucose levels in the blood always rise after a meal but they soon return to normal as the glucose is used up or stored. A glucose tolerance test helps to distinguish between this normal pattern and the patterns seen in diabetes and pre-diabetes. Prior to a glucose tolerance test you are asked not to eat for a certain length of time before the test. Then you drink a sugary drink. Normally, the body should quickly move glucose from the blood into the body's cells. This would reduce the amount of glucose found in the blood samples taken. If there is a problem moving glucose into the cells, glucose remains in the bloodstream. This shows as a higher level of glucose in the blood samples. When the results of the blood samples come back, doctors compare the level of glucose found in your blood Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid Before A Glucose Tolerance Test During Pregnancy

Foods To Avoid Before A Glucose Tolerance Test During Pregnancy

Between 26 and 28 weeks of pregnancy, you will have a glucose screening test to check your blood sugar levels. If the screening test results are high, your doctor will perform a glucose tolerance test in order to diagnose gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes puts you and your baby at risk for immediate and long-term health consequences. It is important to follow your doctor’s instructions before the test to ensure an accurate test result and to follow a diet and exercise routine if you are diagnosed with this condition. Video of the Day For your glucose tolerance test, your practitioner will take a fasting blood draw to determine your blood sugar levels. You will then drink a glucose solution, and your blood will be tested once an hour for three hours. You will stay at the doctor’s office the entire time, so bring something to entertain yourself, arrange for child care for older children and have a snack on hand to eat after the blood draws are complete. If two or more of your blood readings are abnormal, you will be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Eating the Day of the Test According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, you need to abstain from eating anything for at least eight hours prior to your glucose tolerance test. Eat a healthy meal the night before the test. From then on, you are only allowed sips of water. Typically, this test is scheduled for first thing in the morning, so most of the time you are fasting you are asleep. Consider having someone drive you to and from the test if you’re concerned about low energy levels from fasting. According to MedlinePlus, you can eat your standard diet leading up to the test. You may be advised that you need to eat at least 150 grams of carbohydrates per day for three days leading up to the Continue reading >>

Don’t Eat The Cucumber And Other Helpful Tips For The Gestational Diabetes Tests

Don’t Eat The Cucumber And Other Helpful Tips For The Gestational Diabetes Tests

This is not my first rodeo. Three pregnancies in four years and you’d think I could walk through the pre-natal care routine backwards with my eyes closed, but no. No, I made some rookie mistakes last week and I want to share them so that a) you don’t do the same thing b) I remember for the next time, if there is one. Just writing the words “next time” right now makes me want to curl up in the fetal position and find a corner to rock in. But I digress. The one-hour gestational diabetes glucose test: It has a reputation that precedes it, and any formerly pregnant woman anywhere will strike up conversation about that blessed orange drink. First of all, the drink for this test is not as bad as lore makes it out to be. (Isn’t that true of so many things in pregnancy and birth? Hype does not equal reality.) I remember being pleasantly surprised during my first pregnancy to discover that it is carbonated and pretty much tastes like Orange Crush soda. Even for a non-pop drinker, I don’t think it is as much of a shock to the system as we preggos like to yack about. For those who don’t know, you drink the soda, wait for an hour, and then they draw a vile of blood and test your blood sugar level. If it is lower than 140, you pass. Higher, you fail. The one-hour test has no official dietary guidelines except eating nothing between the glucose drink and your blood draw. Most practices and online pregnancy forums will tell you to watch your sugar and carb intake the day of the test, and to stick to a lot of protein. My appointment for the one-hour test was Monday at 2:40 (rookie mistake number one). I had eggs for breakfast, a no-tortilla Chipotle burrito bowl for lunch, and cucumber slices for an afternoon snack before leaving for my midwife’s office (rookie mistake Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Anything Before My Glucose Test Thx - Pregnancy-info

Can I Eat Anything Before My Glucose Test Thx - Pregnancy-info

Can I Eat Anything Before My Glucose Test Thx Hi, I have a glucose tolerance test tomorrow morning and was wondering if I could eat a little something before going to the hospital. I usually get very dizzy when they draw blood and have fainted a couple of times, so it would be good if I don't go on a completely empty stomach. But then again I don't want to jinx the results and have to go through the long test. Please, let me know... Thanks! I wouldnt! All I had the morning of my test was b___tered toast and my test came back 4 points over and I had to do the stupid 3 hour test which came back just fine. I agree with Britt. I was much dumber, though, and ate a poptart before I went. It came back high and I had to do the three hour glucose test which came back fine. I would play it safe and not eat anything. I agree. Besides i wouldn't worry about being dizzy when they take your blood, they are giving you a very sugary drink before you get blood drawn. I ate a chicken sandwich 3 hours before the test and I pa__sed so it guess it depends on the person. I would eat but eat only protein, things like that. No sugar, that's for sure. I was positive I was going to fail, and ate protein that morning, and pa__sed very well. omigoodness! eat! haha..I just had my test a couple days ago and I didn't eat very much before the test..and I didn't have very good blood flow and ended up fainted after they took the blood. Then the nurse told me I was suppossed to eat normally because if you don't eat normally before the test they don't get an accurate reading. My suggestion is to eat normally before the test but just avoid things high in sugar/carbs. My doctor oredered me not to eat or drink anything from 10 pm the night before on an 8 am next day glucose test. If you do eat /drink in bet Continue reading >>

Fasting For Medical Tests

Fasting For Medical Tests

You may be asked to fast by your doctor or nurse. For some medical tests, fasting beforehand gives a more accurate result. For other tests or operations, you need to fast for safety reasons. Your doctor can tell you what to do to prepare for your test. What is fasting? Fasting means not eating and only drinking sips of water. If you are fasting, you can't drink fruit juice, soft drink, coffee, tea or milk, and you can't eat or suck on lollies and chewing gum. Fasting for tests Fasting for blood tests A fasting blood test is usually done in the morning after you have fasted for 8 to 16 hours. Fasting for a gastroscopy You need to fast for 6 hours before a gastroscopy. This is to lower the risk of vomiting up and inhaling what's in your stomach. It also gives the doctor a clear view inside the stomach and intestine. Fasting for a colonoscopy Before a colonoscopy, you eat a low-fibre diet for 2 to 3 days, and have only clear fluids the day before, such as black coffee, apple juice, water or clear jellies. If you have diabetes, make sure you get the right amount of glucose in these fluids. The day before, you also take a medicine to empty your bowel. Finally, for several hours before the procedure you need to fast. Fasting before an anaesthetic If you are being sedated or having a general anaesthetic, your doctor will ask you to stop eating several hours beforehand. You can have small amounts of clear fluids up to 2 hours before. Special considerations for fasting Medication Keep taking your medication as usual before a test, unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Some medications need to be stopped, so be sure to tell your doctor everything you are taking. Diabetes If you are diabetic and you need to fast: check your blood sugar regularly (every 2 hours for example) y Continue reading >>

Hydrogen Breath Test

Hydrogen Breath Test

A hydrogen breath test provides information about the digestion of certain sugars or carbohydrates, such as milk sugar (lactose) or fruit sugar (fructose). This will help determine if you are intolerant to certain sugars. One example is the use of this test to detect lactose intolerance, a disorder in which people have symptoms from abnormal processing of lactose, a substance in many foods including milk and ice cream. The test is also used for detecting abnormal growth of bacteria within the small bowel by having the patient ingest lactulose. Bacterial overgrowth can cause a variety of symptoms including diarrhea, bloating, gas, and abdominal cramps. For four weeks before your test, you should not take any antibiotics. For one week before your test, do not take any laxatives or stool softeners (for example Colace, Milk of Magnesia, Ex-Lax) or stool bulking agents (for example Metamucil or Citrucel). You should also not undergo any test that requires cleansing of the bowel, such as colonoscopy or barium enema. You may consume only the following foods and drinks: plain white bread, plain white rice, plain white potatoes, baked or broiled chicken or fish, water, and non-flavored black coffee or tea. Only salt may be used to flavor your food. Butter and margarine are not permitted. Do not eat or drink anything else it could give false results for the test. Specifically, avoid beans, pasta, fiber cereals, and high fiber foods. The night before the test, have an early dinner of rice and meat. You must stop eating and drinking 12 hours before the test. For example, if your test is at 9:00 am, you would stop eating and drinking at 9:00 pm the night before. You may continue to take your usual prescription medicines with water until 12 hours before the test. Please bring all pr Continue reading >>

Glucola Pregnancy Glucose Test: What I Do

Glucola Pregnancy Glucose Test: What I Do

In my post about the pregnancy and prenatal care options I chose, I mention that I don’t take the pregnancy glucose test that requires drinking glucola (that syrupy orange or grape drink) and that I use an alternate method of testing. I’ve gotten so many questions about this that I decided it deserved its own post, especially while I am still pregnant and the topic is fresh on my mind. IMPORTANT: Please note that I am only writing about my own personal experience with this and the decisions I made after consulting with my OB or midwife (depending on which pregnancy it was). The information in this post (or any post I write) is not medical advice in any way… I’m just sharing my experience. Always consult with your own medical providers before making health decisions, especially during pregnancy, and make sure that you find providers who are willing to work with you to make the best decision for your pregnancy. All that being said, here’s what I do when it comes to the pregnancy glucose test. What is the Pregnancy Glucose Test? This was one of the sections I found in all of the many pregnancy books I read when pregnant with my first child. Current guidelines call for a glucose challenge test somewhere between 24-28 weeks of pregnancy to test for gestational diabetes. This test typically involves drinking a sweetened drink called Glucola that contains 50, 75, or 100 grams of sugar in different forms. In most cases, the first part of this test is an Oral Glucose Challenge Test (OGCT) that involves drinking the 50 gram solution and having a blood test exactly one hour later to measure blood sugar. If a woman passes this test, she typically won’t be given further testing for gestational diabetes. If a woman does not pass the test, a longer test involving a higher Continue reading >>

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