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What Kind Of Doctor Treats Low Blood Sugar

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

A blood glucose of less than 70 mg/dl in general is considered a low blood glucose. Because you may feel some of the symptoms of low blood glucose when your glucose is normal, be sure, if possible, to check your blood glucose when you think it is low. The symptoms of a low blood glucose are: Sweaty and shaky Weak Headache Confused Irritable Hungry Pale Rapid heart rate Uncoordinated If your blood glucose is low, follow the steps below to treat: Follow the 15-15 rule: Eat or drink something from the list below equal to 15 grams of carbohydrate (carb). Rest for 15 minutes, then re-check your blood glucose. If it is still low, (below 70), repeat step 1 above. If your next meal is more than an hour away, you will need to eat one carbohydrate choice as a snack to keep your blood glucose from going low again. If you can't figure out why you have low blood glucose, call your healthcare provider, as your medicine may need to be adjusted. Always carry something with you to treat an insulin reaction. Use food from the list below. Foods equal to One Carbohydrate Choice (15 grams of carb): 3 Glucose tablets or 4 Dextrose tablets 4 ounces of fruit juice 5-6 ounces (about 1/2 can) of regular soda such as Coke or Pepsi 7-8 gummy or regular Life Savers 1 Tbsp. of sugar or jelly Call your doctor Call your doctor or healthcare provider if you have a low blood glucose reaction and do not know what caused it. If you pass out If you have type 1 diabetes and you do not take care of low blood glucose, you may pass out. If you do, a drug called glucagon should be injected into your skin, like you do with insulin. This can be done by a family member or friend who has been taught how to do it. Since glucagon may cause you to vomit, you should be placed on your side when the injection is given. I Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview Diabetes-related blood sugar levels When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others wh Continue reading >>

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar Effectively

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar Effectively

Hypoglycemic symptoms are important clues that you have low blood glucose. An episode of hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, comes on very suddenly. It can happen during or after strenuous exercise, or when you delay a meal. Most people with type 2 diabetes learn to recognize their hypoglycemic symptoms. These include: Sweating Weakness Anxiety Trembling Fast heartbeat Inability to think straight Irritability Grouchiness Hunger Headache Sleepiness Hypoglycemic episodes can also happen while you are asleep. Symptoms include: Crying out or having nightmares Waking up to find your pajamas or sheets are damp from perspiration Feeling tired, irritable, or confused after you wake up What to Do if Your Blood Sugar Is Low If you think your blood glucose may be too low, check your level using your testing equipment. If your blood glucose is less than 70 mg/dL, then you are probably having a hypoglycemic reaction. Hypoglycemia is usually mild and can be treated quickly and easily by eating or drinking a small amount of glucose-rich food. Always carry something to eat in case a hypoglycemic episode happens, such as sugar or glucose tablets, fruit juice, or hard candy. Ask your doctor or certified diabetes educator (CDE) for suggestions about the best form of emergency glucose to have on hand for your particular situation. Next step: Heart Health Risks With Advanced Diabetes Continue reading >>

About Gliclazide

About Gliclazide

Gliclazide is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that is made doesn't work properly. This causes high blood sugar levels. Gliclazide lowers your blood sugar by increasing the amount of insulin your body produces. Gliclazide is available on prescription. It comes as tablets. Key facts Gliclazide works by increasing the amount of insulin that your body makes. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. If you take gliclazide once a day, it's best to take it in the morning with breakfast. Gliclazide can sometimes make your blood sugar level too low (hypoglycaemia). Carry some sweets or fruit juice with you to help when this happens. Gliclazide may make you put on weight. Gliclazide may also be called by the brand names Bilxona, Dacadis, Diamicron, Laaglyda, Nazdol, Vamju, Vitile, Ziclaseg, and Zicron. Who can and can't take gliclazide Gliclazide is only for adults. Do not give this medicine to children under 18 years. Gliclazide isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to gliclazide or any other medicines in the past have severe kidney or liver disease have a rare illness called porphyria are taking miconazole (a treatment for fungal infections) are breastfeeding have an illness called G6PD-deficiency need to have surgery How and when to take it The dose of gliclazide can vary. Take this medicine as prescribed by your doctor. Swallow your gliclazide tablets whole with a glass of water, do not chew them. Different types of gliclazide tablets Gliclazide comes as 2 different types of tablets - normal (standard-release) and long-acting (slow-release). Standard-release tablets releas Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes

Topic Overview Is this topic for you? Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is most common in people who have diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes and need more information about low blood sugar, see the topics: What is low blood sugar? You may have briefly felt the effects of low blood sugar when you've gotten really hungry or exercised hard without eating enough. This happens to nearly everyone from time to time. It's easy to correct and usually nothing to worry about. But low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can also be an ongoing problem. It occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops too low to give your body energy. What causes hypoglycemia in people who don't have diabetes? Ongoing problems with low blood sugar can be caused by: Medicines. Diseases of the liver, kidneys, or pancreas. Metabolic problems. Alcohol use. Stomach surgery. Symptoms can be different depending on how low your blood sugar level drops. Mild hypoglycemia can make you feel hungry or like you want to vomit. You could also feel jittery or nervous. Your heart may beat fast. You may sweat. Or your skin might turn cold and clammy. Moderate hypoglycemia often makes people feel short-tempered, nervous, afraid, or confused. Your vision may blur. You could also feel unsteady or have trouble walking. Severe hypoglycemia can cause you to pass out. You could have seizures. It could even cause a coma or death. If you've had hypoglycemia during the night, you may wake up tired or with a headache. And you may have nightmares. Or you may sweat so much during the night that your pajamas or sheets are damp when you wake up. To diagnose hypoglycemia, your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you questions about your health and any medicines you take. You will need blood tests to check yo Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat To Treat Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)?

What Should I Eat To Treat Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)?

The important thing is to get at least 15-20 grams of sugars or carbohydrates. A food's nutrition label can tell you how much you need to eat of that food to get enough to treat an episode of hypoglycemia. To treat hypoglycemia you should stick with something that is mostly sugar or carbohydrates. Foods that have a lot of fat as well as sugars and carbohydrates, such as chocolate or cookies, do not work as quickly to raise blood glucose levels. Foods with 15 grams carbohydrates: 4 oz (1/2 cup) of juice or regular soda 2 tablespoons of raisins 4 or 5 saltine crackers 4 teaspoons of sugar 1 tablespoon of honey or corn syrup Ask your health care professional or dietitian to list foods that you can use to treat low blood glucose. Then be sure you always have at least one type of sugar with you. The following quick-sugar sources each contain about 15 grams of carbohydrate for treating low blood glucose: 1/2 cup fruit juice or punch (not sugar free) 3 to 4 glucose tablets, or 1 tube glucose gel 1 tablespoon brown sugar, honey, or corn syrup 1 Fruit Roll-Up 1/2 cup regular soft drink (not diet) 8 Lifesavers candies (not sugar free) 2 tablespoons raisins 3 to 5 pieces hard candy 11 jellybeans If these foods aren't available, any carbohydrate source will work. However, candy bars, cookies, and other higher-fat options are poor sources of quick energy -- the fat slows down digestion of carbohydrates. High-fiber foods (such as many fresh fruits) also slow digestion. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Signs and Symptoms Since glucose (sugar) is the brain's primary fuel, your brain feels the majority of the effects of hypoglycemia: Headache Excessive sweating Blurred vision, dizziness Trembling, lack of coordination Depression, anxiety Mental confusion, irritability Heart palpitations Slurred speech Seizures Fatigue Coma What Causes It? The following conditions can cause hypoglycemia: Taking too much insulin, skipping a meal, exercising too strenuously, drinking too much alcohol (in people with diabetes) Critical organ failure (kidney, heart, or liver) Hormone deficiencies Tumors Fasting Inherited abnormalities Lack of an appropriate diet, especially with a critical illness Strenuous exercise Recovery from gastrointestinal surgery Certain medications, including quinolones, pentamidine, quinine, beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme agents and IGF Autoimmune disorders Prolonged illness What to Expect at Your Doctor's Office If your symptoms are not severe, your health care provider will order a blood test called a glucose tolerance test, the same test used to diagnose diabetes. If your levels are only slightly below normal, diet and lifestyle changes may be sufficient. If your symptoms are severe, you will get glucose in either an oral or injectable form to bring your blood sugar level back to normal as quickly as possible. Additional tests may determine the cause of your low blood sugar. Treatment Options It is important to treat low blood sugar immediately to avoid long term serious effects. Hypoglycemia resulting from exercise several hours after a meal rarely produces serious symptoms. A glass of orange juice and a piece of bread can correct your blood sugar levels within minutes. However, in people with underlying diseases, fluctuating blood sugar levels ar Continue reading >>

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

back to Overview Know-how Type 2 A tag-team approach on low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. Markus recently wrote an article on our German language blog talking about low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. The question (“can I have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes?”) is very common, and it’s easy to see why it’s of concern. So I’ve helped Markus bring his German post to life here in English. I hope it helps! Here’s Markus: Low blood sugar In 2014, results from the DAWN2 study were announced. It was the largest study of its kind (15,000 participants) on the “fears & needs of people with diabetes and their families.” One result stood out: The gravest fears are related to low blood sugars, especially at night. Up to 69% of the participants share this fear! So! Can you have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes? Yes! Of course! But let’s think about who exactly is at risk – and why. It’s common to think: Type 1 diabetes = at risk for lows Type 2 diabetes = not at risk for lows But that isn’t correct at all, so we should wipe it from our mind. So… what do I need to know? Maybe it’s more accurate to say that people with type 2 diabetes who take certain types of medication are more at risk for lows. We’re getting closer! But to get to the truth, we should take a look at someone without diabetes. Is it possible for them to have lows, too? Theoretically yes, especially if doing long-lasting physical activities without proper food intake. Additionally, extreme stress and binge drinking are also common causes of low blood sugar for people without diabetes. However, it’s pretty rare because as soon as BG’s drop below 80 mg/dl (4.4 mmol/L), the natural counterregulatory system kicks in, raising blood sugar back to normal levels. I’ve never exp Continue reading >>

Treating Hypoglycemia (low Blood Glucose)

Treating Hypoglycemia (low Blood Glucose)

Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes What is hypoglycemia? When your blood glucose (blood sugar) level goes below 70, or you have certain symptoms, we say you have hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). If not treated quickly, it can be dangerous. Follow the treatment guidelines listed here. If you over-treat low glucose, it can cause "rebound hyperglycemia" (high blood glucose), which is not healthy for your body. Reduce your risk of hypoglycemia Treat low blood glucose right away. Eat balanced meals and snacks spread evenly throughout the day. Your blood glucose should be at least 100 to drive, exercise, do heavy housework or if you can't eat for an hour. Take the prescribed amount of medicines that lower blood glucose (such as sulfonylureas, meglitinides or insulin). Ask your doctor before taking any herbal remedies (such as bitter melon or fenugreek), as these may lower blood glucose. Watch your blood glucose carefully if you are under stress, exercising harder or more often or drinking alcohol on an empty stomach. Call your care team if your blood glucose readings are often low. What are the signs of low blood glucose? You may have low blood glucose if: You feel shaky. You start sweating. Your heart begins to beat fast. You feel dizzy, tired or weak. You feel nervous, crabby or confused. You are suddenly very hungry. You cannot see well. You have a headache. Your lips or mouth feel numb or tingly. Very young children may seem dazed, confused, tired and crabby. If they are old enough to talk, their speech may slow. Some children use a special word to describe how they are feeling, such as "silly," "weird" or "tired." Sometimes symptoms occur at night. If you are restless, sweating, having nightmares or waking up with headaches, you may have low blood glucose. Check your glucose an Continue reading >>

2017 The Nemours Foundation. All Rights Reserved.

2017 The Nemours Foundation. All Rights Reserved.

No matter what we're doing, even during sleep, our brains depend on glucose to function. Glucose is a sugar that comes from food, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to them through the bloodstream. When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia. Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that need immediate medical treatment. Blood sugar levels in someone with diabetes are considered low when they fall below the target range. A blood sugar level slightly lower than the target range might not cause symptoms, but repeated low levels could require a change in the treatment plan to help avoid problems. The diabetes health care team will find a child's target blood sugar levels based on things like the child's age, ability to recognize hypoglycemia symptoms, and the goals of the diabetes treatment plan. Low blood sugar levels are fairly common in people with diabetes. A major goal of diabetes care is to keep blood sugar levels from getting or staying too high to prevent both short- and long-term health problems. To do this, people with diabetes may use insulin and/or pills, depending on the type of diabetes they have. These medicines usually help keep blood sugar levels in a healthy range, but in certain situations, might make them drop too low. Hypoglycemia can happen at any time in people taking blood sugar-lowering medicines, but is more likely if someone: skips or delays meals or snacks or doesn't eat as much carbohydrate-containing food as expected when taking the diabetes medicine. This is common in kids who develop an illness (such as a stomach virus) that causes loss of appetite, nausea, or vomiting. takes too much insulin, ta Continue reading >>

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

Many people who have diabetes also have an experienced primary care (or family practice) doctor or nurse practitioner who can help them manage their diabetes. For example, people with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes may never need to see a specialist because they can easily manage it with their primary care doctor’s help. Other people, however, might choose to see a specialist. Here are 10 reasons why you might want to see an endocrinologist or diabetes care team: 1) Your doctor recommends you have an evaluation with a specialist. After you have been diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may recommend you see a specialist to confirm the diagnosis and make sure you know your options for managing the disease. 2) Your primary care physician has not treated many diabetes patients. If your doctor has not treated many patients with diabetes or you are unsure about their treatment, you can choose to see a specialist. 3) You are having problems communicating with your doctor. If you feel your doctor is not listening to you or understanding your symptoms, you could see a specialist who will focus primarily on your diabetes. 4) You cannot find the right educational material to help you. Treatment for diabetes starts with learning to manage your diabetes. If you can’t find the right information to help you manage your diabetes, you might want to see a diabetes care team to receive diabetes education. 5) You are having complications or difficulty managing your diabetes. You should definitely see a specialist if you have developed complications. Diabetes typically causes problems with the eyes, kidney, and nerves. In addition, it can cause deformity and open sores on the feet. Diabetes complications only get worse with time, and can cause you to miss out on quality of life. In addi Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Uncontrolled glucose levels are one of the most common health problems in the world. Hypoglycemia symptoms frequently affect people with prediabetes or diabetes but are also linked with other health problems, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol and even arthritis. And although it’s rarely mentioned, hypoglycemia has been called “an under-appreciated problem” that’s the most common and serious side effect of glucose-lowering diabetes drugs. (1) Those who are at risk for both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are not only people who are ill, overweight or inactive — anyone who consumes a poor diet and has trouble with normal glucose metabolism can develop symptoms. The standard American diet, which tends to be very high in things like refined grains and sugar but low in nutrients like healthy fats and fiber, contributes to hypoglycemia and related diseases. What are some clues you might be experiencing hypoglycemia symptoms, and what kind of things can you do to help manage them? Symptoms of hypoglycemia are often confused with other health conditions and can include sudden hunger, irritability, headaches, brain fog and shakiness. By managing your intake of empty calories, improving your diet, and paying attention to how meal timing and exercise affects you, you can help control low blood sugar symptoms and prevent them from returning. What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition caused by low blood sugar levels, also sometimes referred to as low glucose. Glucose is mostly found in carbohydrate foods and those containing sugar and is considered to be one of the most important sources of energy for the body. (2) Here’s an overview of how glucose works once it enters the body and the process of how our hormones regulate blood sugar levels: When we Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Low blood sugar is a condition that occurs when your blood sugar (glucose) is lower than normal. Low blood sugar may occur in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or certain other medicines to control their diabetes. Low blood sugar can cause dangerous symptoms. Learn how to recognize the symptoms of low blood sugar and how to prevent them. What is Low Blood Sugar? Low blood sugar is called hypoglycemia. A blood sugar level below 70 mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L) is low and can harm you. A blood sugar level below 54 mg/dL (3.0 mmol/L) is cause for immediate action. You are at risk for low blood sugar if you have diabetes and are taking any of the following diabetes medicines: Insulin Glyburide (Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol), glimepiride (Amaryl), repaglinide (Prandin), or nateglinide (Starlix) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), acetohexamide (Dymelor), or tolbutamide (Orinase) Recognizing Low Blood Sugar Know how to tell when your blood sugar is getting low. Symptoms include: Weakness or feeling tired Shaking Sweating Headache Hunger Feeling uneasy, nervous, or anxious Feeling cranky Trouble thinking clearly Double or blurry vision Fast or pounding heartbeat Sometimes your blood sugar may be too low even if you do not have symptoms. If it gets too low, you may: Faint Have a seizure Go into a coma Check Your Blood Sugar Often Talk with your health care provider about when you should check your blood sugar every day. People who have low blood sugar need to check their blood sugar more often. The most common causes of low blood sugar are: Taking your insulin or diabetes medicine at the wrong time Taking too much insulin or diabetes medicine Not eating enough during meals or snacks after you have taken insulin or diabetes medicine Skipping meals Waiting too l Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes

Low Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes

I’ve spoken to far too many people with type 2 diabetes who start to explain to me these moments of severe dizziness and shaking, and the desperate urge to eat food that they experience sometimes every day, sometimes just once a week. The problem is that no one ever explained to them what a low blood sugar feels like, how to treat a low blood sugar properly, and why it’s happening. It seems as though many busy physicians short on time assume that a person with type 2 diabetes whose A1C is higher than ideal couldn’t possibly be experiencing low blood sugars. Unfortunately, that assumption simply isn’t true. Simple guide to low blood sugars in type 2 diabetes: What is hypoglycemia (low blood sugar): the American Diabetes Association defines hypoglycemia as an event that occurs when your blood sugar drops below 70 mg/dL. If you don’t currently own a glucose meter to actually check your blood sugar level, you can a) ask your doctor for a prescription and b) stay alert to the signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar described below. You may experience some or all of the following symptoms during a low blood sugar: lightheaded, dizzy, trembling, shaking, weakness, headache, sweating, numbness in your lips, tingling in your numbs, a jello-like feeling in your limbs. To see a full list, visit Diabetes.org. Severe hypoglycemia under 30 mg/dL can lead to seizures or comas. It’s important to catch the signs and symptoms sooner than later. The cause of these low blood sugars can be: Oral medications: Most oral diabetes medications (except for Metformin) are known to cause low blood sugars. This means the dosage is possibly too high, and you should explain your low blood sugars to your doctor so she/he can adjust your dosage. Fast-Acting Insulin: Too often, when type 2 di Continue reading >>

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                                                                                   _____________________________________________________                                                                                                                                                                     healthy living How to Treat Low Blood Sugar Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can happen for many reasons. By quickly recognizing the signs of low blood sugar, you can treat them and prevent more serious symptoms. Hypoglycemia means that you have low levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. A low blood sugar is below 70. Glucose is an important sugar, since the cells of the brain, muscles, and many parts of the body use it for energy. If the brain cells do not get enough glucose, you can pass out. Check the symptoms you usually have When you have low blood sugars Also, you may have: (hypoglycemia), you may feel: q pale skin color q dizzy q difficulty thinking clearly q sweaty or reading q irritable/cranky q heavy breathing q shaky q slurred speech q hungry q clumsy or jerky move q headache ments; poor coordination q nervous q seizures q fast heart beat q sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason q tingling sensation around the mouth and/or in fingers q gen Continue reading >>

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