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What Is The Range For Low Blood Sugar?

Hypoglycemia In Children

Hypoglycemia In Children

What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia occurs when the blood sugar is too low to fuel the brain and the body. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body. The normal range of blood sugar, depending on the timing and nutritional content of the last meal consumed, is approximately 70 to 140 mg/dl (milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood). If you have type 1 diabetes, your goal blood sugar range may be slightly different. Infants and small children with type 1 diabetes will have different goal ranges than adolescents or adults. However, consult your child's doctor for more specific information. Hypoglycemia may be a condition by itself, or may be a complication of diabetes or another disorder. Hypoglycemia is most often seen as a complication of overdoing insulin in a person with diabetes, which is sometimes referred to as an insulin reaction. What causes hypoglycemia? Causes of hypoglycemia in children with diabetes may include the following: Too much medication; for instance, too much insulin or oral diabetes medication Medication mistakes. All families will, at some point, give the wrong kind of insulin for a meal or at bedtime. Inaccurate blood-glucose readings A missed meal A delayed meal Too little food eaten, as compared to the amount of insulin taken More exercise than usual Diarrhea or vomiting Injury, illness, infection, or emotional stress Other medical problems sometimes seen in people with type 1 diabetes, such as celiac disease or an adrenal problem. An additional cause of hypoglycemia in neonates and toddlers includes a group of conditions called hyperinsulinism. This may occur as a result of abnormal cell development of the special "beta" cells in the pancreas that secrete insulin or from a mass in the pancreas. Hypoglycemia due to endogenous insulin i Continue reading >>

What Is Low Blood Sugar Level?

What Is Low Blood Sugar Level?

Low blood sugar or hypolgycemia is a serious condition. Too much insulin, not enough food, and extreme exertion can cause hypoglycemia. Treatment is a process of steps that you need to follow carefully. Levels Normal blood sugar levels are 70 to 100 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL. Levels below 70 are low blood sugar levels. Dangers For women, levels of 40 mg/dL or lower are dangerous. For men, the levels are 50 mg/dL or lower. Results When blood sugar levels fall below 70 mg/dL, mild symptoms occur such as dizziness or shakiness. When blood sugar levels drop to 40 or 50 mg/dL, you may feel confusion, weakness and even pass out. Reasons Insulin is used to move sugar from the blood to the blood cells. Too much insulin causes too little sugar in the blood. Food is needed to produce sugar, so too little food causes low sugar levels. Exercise uses sugar for energy. Treatment When symptoms occur, the diabetic needs to check the blood sugar and drink either juice or soda or eat sugar, honey, maple syrup, raisins or glucose tablets. If unresponsive, the diabetic needs a shot of glucagon. Prevention/Solution Diabetics need to eat regularly, take medication as directed and test blood sugar levels regularly. Pauline Gill is a retired teacher with more than 25 years of experience teaching English to high school students. She holds a bachelor's degree in language arts and a Master of Education degree. Gill is also an award-winning fiction author. Continue reading >>

How To Handle Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

How To Handle Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

When you have diabetes, you may have high or low blood sugar levels from time to time. It's important to know the signs and symptoms of each and follow your healthcare provider's instructions for handling them. Continue reading >>

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

A blood glucose of less than 70 mg/dl in general is considered a low blood glucose. Because you may feel some of the symptoms of low blood glucose when your glucose is normal, be sure, if possible, to check your blood glucose when you think it is low. The symptoms of a low blood glucose are: Sweaty and shaky Weak Headache Confused Irritable Hungry Pale Rapid heart rate Uncoordinated If your blood glucose is low, follow the steps below to treat: Follow the 15-15 rule: Eat or drink something from the list below equal to 15 grams of carbohydrate (carb). Rest for 15 minutes, then re-check your blood glucose. If it is still low, (below 70), repeat step 1 above. If your next meal is more than an hour away, you will need to eat one carbohydrate choice as a snack to keep your blood glucose from going low again. If you can't figure out why you have low blood glucose, call your healthcare provider, as your medicine may need to be adjusted. Always carry something with you to treat an insulin reaction. Use food from the list below. Foods equal to One Carbohydrate Choice (15 grams of carb): 3 Glucose tablets or 4 Dextrose tablets 4 ounces of fruit juice 5-6 ounces (about 1/2 can) of regular soda such as Coke or Pepsi 7-8 gummy or regular Life Savers 1 Tbsp. of sugar or jelly Call your doctor Call your doctor or healthcare provider if you have a low blood glucose reaction and do not know what caused it. If you pass out If you have type 1 diabetes and you do not take care of low blood glucose, you may pass out. If you do, a drug called glucagon should be injected into your skin, like you do with insulin. This can be done by a family member or friend who has been taught how to do it. Since glucagon may cause you to vomit, you should be placed on your side when the injection is given. I Continue reading >>

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

No matter what we're doing — even when we're sleeping — our brains depend on glucose to function. Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and it's carried to each cell through the bloodstream. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia (pronounced: hi-po-gly-SEE-me-uh). Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that need to be treated right away. People with diabetes can have low blood sugar levels because of the medicines they have to take to manage their diabetes. They may need a hormone called insulin or diabetes pills (or both) to help their bodies use the sugar in their blood. These medicines help take the sugar out of the blood and get it into the body's cells, which makes the level of sugar in the blood go down. But sometimes it's a tricky balancing act and blood sugar levels can get too low. People with diabetes need to keep their blood sugars from getting too high or too low. Part of keeping blood sugar levels in a healthy range is having good timing, and balancing when and what they eat and when they exercise with when they take medicines. Some things that can make low blood sugar levels more likely to happen are: skipping meals and snacks not eating enough food at a meal or snack exercising longer or harder than usual without eating some extra food getting too much insulin not timing the insulin doses properly with meals, snacks, and exercise Also, certain things may increase how quickly insulin gets absorbed into the bloodstream and can make hypoglycemia more likely to occur. For example, taking a hot shower Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, which is called hypoglycemia, means your body does not have enough sugar in the blood to fuel all of your body’s cells. Typically a low blood sugar is defined as anything below 70 mg/dL (3.8 mmol). It is also sometimes called an “insulin reaction” or “insulin shock”. When your blood sugars drops below this level, you may begin to feel a variety of symptoms. As your body runs short on fuel, you may feel shaky, nervous, anxious, or irritable. You may begin to sweat or get the chills. Your heart may race. As your brain operates on less sugar, you may feel confused or delirious or get a headache. Each person feels different low blood sugar symptoms. Some don’t feel any symptoms at all, which is called hypoglycemia unawareness. It is important to learn and recognize your own symptoms. Sometimes, you may feel like you have low blood sugar even when you don’t. This can happen when you have had a high blood sugar for a long-time, such as at diagnosis, and your body is first coming back into the normal range. Although it may feel unpleasant, these symptoms will go away in a week or two and you will feel better than you did when you had high blood sugars all of the time. You may also feel symptoms of low blood sugar when your blood sugar is dropping rapidly. Your body is sensing the rapid loss of sugar for fuel and sending you warning signals. Don’t guess whether or not you have a low blood sugar. It is important to use your blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar and confirm before treating it. Studies have shown people are not good at guessing their blood sugars (but often think that they are). According to the American Diabetes Association, if you feel symptoms of low blood sugar and are unable to test your blood sugar, err on the side of Continue reading >>

Is Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia) Dangerous?

Is Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia) Dangerous?

Low blood glucose or hypoglycemia is one of the most common problems associated with insulin treatment, but it can also happen to people with diabetes taking pills. In general, hypoglycemia is defined as a blood glucose level below 70 mg/dl. Low blood glucose is usually unpleasant, with the most common symptoms including feeling shaky, sweaty and having one's heart pound. The most common reasons for hypoglycemia are too much diabetes medicine, too little food or a delayed meal, or too much or unplanned activity. A less common, but occasional cause for hypoglycemia, is drinking alcoholic beverages. Most hypoglycemia is mild with recognizable symptoms. If quickly and appropriately treated, it is more of an inconvenience than a cause for alarm. However, severe hypoglycemia that causes mental confusion, antagonistic behaviors, unconsciousness, or seizures is a reason for alarm. We define severe hypoglycemia as the point at which you are not able to independently treat yourself. It is dangerous and to be avoided! Not because hypoglycemia, in itself, is fatal. That is very, very rare. What is dangerous is what might happen as a result of the hypoglycemia. The biggest danger is a motor vehicle accident caused, for example, by passing out at the wheel, swerving into on-coming traffic, hitting a tree, or running stop signs. Sometimes people are seriously injured in other types of accidents related to hypoglycemia, such as falling down stairs. It is equally important to avoid unconsciousness and seizures caused by hypoglycemia, not only because of the increased risk for accidents, but because of the potential for brain damage related to repeated severe hypoglycemia. Guidelines for managing hypoglycemia Recognize symptoms (physical, emotional, mental) and that these symptoms are v Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview Diabetes-related blood sugar levels When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others wh Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics

Low Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics

Blood sugar levels that drop too low can be just as dangerous as high blood sugar levels. This is especially a concern for diabetics, but nondiabetics can develop symptoms and health problems as well. To avoid complications it is important to be familiar with the warning signs of low blood sugar and what the common triggers are. If caught early, raising blood sugar levels with food can help avoid a life-threatening situation. Video of the Day Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is diagnosed when blood sugar or blood glucose levels drop below normal. Glucose is the primary source of fuel for the body and without enough of it, symptoms and health problems can occur. After a meal the food is broken down into glucose and either used immediately for energy or it is stored for use later on. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, when blood glucose levels drop too low, the pancreas signals the liver to release the stored glucose into the bloodstream, until levels return to normal. If not enough glucose is available, symptoms can occur. For those without diabetes, normal fasting blood glucose levels should be between 70 to 99 mg/dL and between 70 to 140 mg/dL after eating a meal. Without enough glucose the body will not be able to function normally. Early warning signs of low blood sugar include hunger, fatigue, sweating, headaches, shakiness, dizziness, weakness, confusion, difficulty coordinating movement, anxiety, problems with vision, upset stomach and trouble speaking, Medline Plus states. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can cause fainting, a loss of consciousness, irregular heartbeats, tremors, seizures and coma. In severe cases it can be fatal. In those without diabetes, low blood sugar levels are usually caused by skipping meals or heavy alcohol con Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Cats

Low Blood Sugar In Cats

Hypoglycemia in Cats The blood sugar, or glucose, is a main energy of source in an animal's body, so a low amount will result in a severe decrease in energy levels, possibly to the point of loss of consciousness. The medical term for critically low levels of sugar in the blood is hypoglycemia, and it is often linked to diabetes and an overdose of insulin. However, there are different conditions, other than diabetes, that can also cause blood sugar levels to drop to dangerous levels in cats. In most animals, hypoglycemia is actually not a disease in and of itself, but is only an indication of another underlying health problem. The brain actually needs a steady supply of glucose in order to function properly, as it does not store and create glucose itself. When glucose levels drop to a dangerously low level, a condition of hypoglycemia takes place. This is a dangerous health condition and needs to be treated quickly and appropriately. If you suspect hypoglycemia, especially if your cat is disposed to this condition, you will need to treat the condition quickly before it becomes life threatening. Symptoms Loss of appetite (anorexia) Increased hunger Visual instability, such as blurred vision Disorientation and confusion — may show an apparent inability to complete basic routine tasks Weakness, low energy, loss of consciousness Seizures (rare) Anxiety, restlessness Tremor/shivering Heart palpitations These symptoms may not be specific to hypoglycemia, there can be other possible underlying medical causes. The best way to determine hypoglycemia if by having the blood sugar level measured while the symptoms are apparent. Causes There may be several causes for hypoglycemia, but the most common is the side effects caused by drugs that are being used to treat diabetes. Cats wi Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatments

Low Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatments

Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is the most common and most dangerous condition for many people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Very low blood sugar may lead to insulin shock, which can be life threatening if not treated promptly. Low blood sugar occurs when the body has too little food/glucose or too much insulin. The following are all potential reasons that a person with diabetes might have low blood sugar: Too much insulin taken Eating less than usual Eating later than usual Insulin was injected at a site on the body where the absorption rate is faster than usual Injecting extra insulin after forgetting about a previous dose More exercise than normal Illness or injury Other hormones Medication interaction The following is a list of general symptoms that indicate low blood sugar (the person with T1D may exhibit one or more of these and symptoms may change from event to event) Dizziness Nervousness Personality change/irrational behavior Blurry vision Shakiness Nausea Crying Sluggishness Sweating Poor coordination Hunger Lightheadedness Irritability Drowsiness Erratic response to questions Inability to concentrate Severe symptoms (symptoms as listed above, plus): Convulsions or seizure Loss of consciousness A blood-glucose meter reading below the target range specified by the physician indicates low blood sugar. The following are general treatments for low blood sugar. The physician and parents (for a child) should determine what course to follow. Please note that people with T1D have symptoms of low blood sugar at various readings. Some people with T1D feel perfectly fine at readings below 70. Others begin to show low blood-sugar symptoms at readings somewhat above 70. If blood-sugar levels are slightly low and the person is alert and lucid, he or she should: Not exercis Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

What is hypoglycemia? People who have diabetes and use insulin or diabetes pills can have low blood sugar (glucose). Low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia, happens when the level of sugar in the blood falls below 70 mg/dl. Blood sugar drops when there is more insulin than needed to regulate the sugar level. What are the causes of hypoglycemia? Eating meals late or skipping meals. Not eating the whole meal or enough carbohydrates. Being more active than usual. Taking more medicine than needed. Drinking alcohol without eating. Any combination of the above. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? Weakness or shaking. Moist skin, sweating. Fast heartbeat. Dizziness. Sudden hunger. Confusion. Pale skin. Numbness in mouth or tongue. Irritability, nervousness. Unsteadiness. Nightmares, bad dreams, restless sleep. You might pass out if your hypoglycemia is not treated. Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

The aim of diabetes treatment is to bring blood sugar (“glucose”) as close to normal as possible. What is a normal blood sugar level? And how can you achieve normal blood sugar? First, what is the difference between “sugar” and “glucose”? Sugar is the general name for sweet carbohydrates that dissolve in water. “Carbohydrate” means a food made only of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. There are various different kinds of sugars. The one our body uses most is called “glucose.” Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies. Then we can use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. When people talk about “blood sugar,” they mean “blood glucose.” The two terms mean the same thing. In the U.S., blood sugar is normally measured in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dl). A milligram is very little, about 0.00018 of a teaspoon. A deciliter is about 3 1/3 ounces. In Canada and the United Kingdom, blood sugar is reported in millimoles/liter (mmol/L). You can convert Canadian or British glucose levels to American numbers if you multiply them by 18. This is useful to know if you’re reading comments or studies from England or Canada. If someone reports that their fasting blood glucose was 7, you can multiply that by 18 and get their U.S. glucose level of 126 mg/dl. What are normal glucose numbers? They vary throughout the day. (Click here for a blood sugar chart.) For someone without diabetes, a fasting blood sugar on awakening should be under 100 mg/dl. Before-meal normal sugars are 70–99 mg/dl. “Postprandial” sugars taken two hours after meals should be less than 140 mg/dl. Those are the normal numbers for someone w Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

South Eastern Florida Regional Diabetes Program Diabetes Education Service 1450 Northwest 10th Avenue, Miami FL, 33136 Phone: 305â€243â€3696  Fax:305â€243â€5791 © 2009 H ypoglycemia or a ‘hypo’ means having a blood sugar level below 70mg/dL and usually only occurs in people who take certain tablets or injectable medication to treat  their diabetes. Hypoglycemia is usually avoidable, however, it is important that if you do experience a low blood sugar level, you know how to recognize and importantly treat the situation. Prevention of low blood sugar levels is the primary goal.   What are the Symptoms of Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia The “Rule of 15†Blood sugar less than 70mg/dl 15 grams quick acting carbs (Glucose tablets, juice, regular soda, or candy) Recheck blood sugar in 15 minutes Repeat 15 grams of quick acting carbs until blood sugar is above 70 mg/dl There are two stages of symptoms or signs associated with low blood sugars:  These first stage symptoms are our safety symptoms that warn us of low blood sugar levels. It is important to listen and respond to these symptoms. They usually occur with blood sugar levels between 55 – 70mg/dl. If you have had elevated blood sugar levels above 200mg/dl for a period of time, you may feel low at normal blood sugar levels of 80 – 100mg/dL.   These second sta Continue reading >>

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