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What Is The Range For Low Blood Sugar?

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

South Eastern Florida Regional Diabetes Program Diabetes Education Service 1450 Northwest 10th Avenue, Miami FL, 33136 Phone: 305â€243â€3696  Fax:305â€243â€5791 © 2009 H ypoglycemia or a ‘hypo’ means having a blood sugar level below 70mg/dL and usually only occurs in people who take certain tablets or injectable medication to treat  their diabetes. Hypoglycemia is usually avoidable, however, it is important that if you do experience a low blood sugar level, you know how to recognize and importantly treat the situation. Prevention of low blood sugar levels is the primary goal.   What are the Symptoms of Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia The “Rule of 15†Blood sugar less than 70mg/dl 15 grams quick acting carbs (Glucose tablets, juice, regular soda, or candy) Recheck blood sugar in 15 minutes Repeat 15 grams of quick acting carbs until blood sugar is above 70 mg/dl There are two stages of symptoms or signs associated with low blood sugars:  These first stage symptoms are our safety symptoms that warn us of low blood sugar levels. It is important to listen and respond to these symptoms. They usually occur with blood sugar levels between 55 – 70mg/dl. If you have had elevated blood sugar levels above 200mg/dl for a period of time, you may feel low at normal blood sugar levels of 80 – 100mg/dL.   These second sta Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Overview

Hypoglycemia Overview

Hypoglycemia means low (hypo) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates (e.g., fruit, bread, potatoes, milk, and rice) are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet, and your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose. The glucose is then transported in your blood to cells that need it; it gives your body energy. However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. Sometimes, your blood glucose level can drop too low—that's hypoglycemia. It usually happens quite quickly, and it can be handled quite quickly, as well. People with type 1 diabetes do not make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes fall into two categories when it comes to insulin: either their body doesn't make enough, or their body is unable to use it well (insulin resistance). Normal Blood Glucose The American Diabetes Association published the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes that provide recommended target blood glucose ranges for people with and without diabetes. The standard for measuring blood glucose is “mg/dL,” which means milligrams per deciliter. People without Diabetes After eating (called postprandial) 70 to 140 mg/dL Goals for People with Diabetes Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million A Continue reading >>

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is common among people with diabetes and can occur even when you're carefully managing the condition. "Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of blood glucose (sugar in the blood) drops to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet. "In most people, this is defined as a blood-sugar level below 70 milligrams per deciliter." A review published in June 2015 in the journal PLoS One found that among people with type 2 diabetes, this is a far too common occurrence. Individuals with the condition had an average of 19 mild episodes of hypoglycemia per year, and nearly one severe episode per year on average. Low blood sugar was particularly common among those taking insulin. This decrease in blood sugar levels can cause both short-term complications, like confusion and dizziness, as well as more serious, long-term complications. Left untreated, it can lead to a coma and even death. To prevent hypoglycemia and its dangerous side effects, it's crucial to monitor your glucose levels and treat low blood sugar as soon as you become aware of it. Pay attention to these telltale signs of dipping blood sugar levels to make sure yours stays under control: 1. Ravenous Hunger If you've already eaten but still aren't satisfied, or if you suddenly, inexplicably feel as if you're starving, your body is signaling that it needs more glucose. Work with your healthcare team to determine the exact amount of sugar your body needs. A good starting point is the American Diabetes Association's recommendation to eat between 15 and 20 grams (g) of sugar or carbohydrates with each snack, and between 40 and 65 g at each meal. Some good options include 2 tablespoons of raisins, 4 ounces of fruit juice Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hypoglycemia

Diabetes And Hypoglycemia

Tweet Hypoglycemia occurs when blood glucose levels fall below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Whilst many of us think of diabetes as being a problem of high blood sugar levels, the medication some people with diabetes take medication that can also cause their sugar levels to go too low and this can become dangerous. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia occurs when the level of glucose present in the blood falls below a set point: Below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL) Being aware of the early signs of hypoglycemia will allow you to treat your low blood glucose levels quickly - in order to bring them back into the normal range. It is also recommended to make close friends and family aware of the signs of hypoglycemia in case you fail to recognise the symptoms. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? The main symptoms associated with hypoglycemia are: Sweating Feeling dizzy Symptoms of hypoglycemia can also include: Being pale Feeling weak Feeling hungry A higher heart rate than usual Blurred vision Confusion Convulsions Loss of consciousness And in extreme cases, coma Who is at risk of hypos? Whilst low blood sugar can happen to anyone, dangerously low blood sugar can occur in people who take the following medication: Sulphopnylureas (such as glibenclamide, gliclazide, glipizide, glimepiride, tolbutamide) Prandial glucose regulators (such as repaglinide, nateglinide) If you are not sure whether your diabetes medication can cause hypos, read the patient information leaflet that comes with each of your medications or ask your doctor. It is important to know whether your diabetes medication puts you at risk of hypos. What are the causes of hypoglycemia? Whilst medication is the main factor involved in hypoglycemia within people with diabetes, a number of other factors can increase the risk of hypos oc Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Is It Epilepsy Or A Low Blood Sugar Seizure?

Is It Epilepsy Or A Low Blood Sugar Seizure?

A seizure is a symptom of a brain problem that occurs because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. There are many types of seizures and most last from thirty seconds to two minutes. Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries, and certain diseases such as diabetes and epilepsy. What causes a seizure in people with diabetes? Hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, occurs when the level of glucose in a person’s body drops below normal. Hypoglycemia can be dangerous and occurs in people with type 1 diabetes, and people with type 2 diabetes who are injecting insulin or using oral medications (sulfonylureas and meglitinides) to lower blood glucose. Sulfonylureas stimulate the beta cells of the pancreas to release more insulin. Brand names include: Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol and Glucotrol XL) Glyburide (Micronase, Glynase, and Diabeta) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Meglitinides also stimulate the beta cells to release insulin. Brand names include: Repaglinide (Prandin) Nateglinide (Starlix) When someone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes experiences a significant drop in their blood glucose, they may experience a range of symptoms that include: Dizziness Sweating Confusion Hunger Extremely low blood glucose can result in a “seizure,” which, if left untreated, can lead to a coma. If you are taking a medication that causes the pancreas to release more insulin, or if you are taking insulin injections, it’s important to know whether you are having low glucose levels during the night while sleeping, as this could be the cause of your seizures. A continuous glucose monitoring system—a pager-sized device typically worn for two to three days that measures your blood glucose every five minutes—can determine if you are Continue reading >>

What Is Low Blood Sugar Level?

What Is Low Blood Sugar Level?

Low blood sugar or hypolgycemia is a serious condition. Too much insulin, not enough food, and extreme exertion can cause hypoglycemia. Treatment is a process of steps that you need to follow carefully. Levels Normal blood sugar levels are 70 to 100 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL. Levels below 70 are low blood sugar levels. Dangers For women, levels of 40 mg/dL or lower are dangerous. For men, the levels are 50 mg/dL or lower. Results When blood sugar levels fall below 70 mg/dL, mild symptoms occur such as dizziness or shakiness. When blood sugar levels drop to 40 or 50 mg/dL, you may feel confusion, weakness and even pass out. Reasons Insulin is used to move sugar from the blood to the blood cells. Too much insulin causes too little sugar in the blood. Food is needed to produce sugar, so too little food causes low sugar levels. Exercise uses sugar for energy. Treatment When symptoms occur, the diabetic needs to check the blood sugar and drink either juice or soda or eat sugar, honey, maple syrup, raisins or glucose tablets. If unresponsive, the diabetic needs a shot of glucagon. Prevention/Solution Diabetics need to eat regularly, take medication as directed and test blood sugar levels regularly. Pauline Gill is a retired teacher with more than 25 years of experience teaching English to high school students. She holds a bachelor's degree in language arts and a Master of Education degree. Gill is also an award-winning fiction author. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview Diabetes-related blood sugar levels When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others wh Continue reading >>

Glucose Tablets Likely Better For Easing Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Glucose Tablets Likely Better For Easing Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

(Reuters Health) - When people with diabetes experience a dangerous drop in blood sugar, glucose tablets might be a better option than a sugary food or drink, a study suggests. People with diabetes can develop hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, if they skip a meal, exercise harder than usual or take too much insulin or other diabetes medications. Low blood sugar can cause fatigue, anxiety, rapid heartbeat, sweating, mental confusion or even coma or seizures if not treated quickly. For a new study, researchers pooled data from four papers in the medical literature that compared the effect of dietary sugars and glucose tablets on relieving low blood sugar symptoms, including three randomized trials, which are generally the most reliable kind of medical study. As reported in the Emergency Medicine Journal, the adults and children in the studies had type 1 or type 2 diabetes. All of them were awake throughout their episodes of low blood sugar. Altogether, 515 low blood sugar episodes were treated with dietary sugar and 232 were treated with glucose tablets. Across the four studies, different forms of dietary sugars were used, including Skittles candies, orange juice, Mentos candies, jelly beans, cornstarch, milk and glucose gels. In general, the individual substances were about as effective as the glucose tablets for getting blood sugar levels to rise. When results from all four studies were combined, neither dietary sugars nor glucose tablets reliably returned blood sugar levels to normal within 10 to 15 minutes, according to the research team. “Regardless of the oral (method) used to treat hypoglycemia, time is required for absorption before the measured blood returns to the normal range and the patient’s symptoms improve,” the authors wrote. However, people who used Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Tweet Understanding blood glucose level ranges can be a key part of diabetes self-management. This page states 'normal' blood sugar ranges and blood sugar ranges for adults and children with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and blood sugar ranges to determine people with diabetes. If a person with diabetes has a meter, test strips and is testing, it's important to know what the blood glucose level means. Recommended blood glucose levels have a degree of interpretation for every individual and you should discuss this with your healthcare team. In addition, women may be set target blood sugar levels during pregnancy. The following ranges are guidelines provided by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) but each individual’s target range should be agreed by their doctor or diabetic consultant. Recommended target blood glucose level ranges The NICE recommended target blood glucose levels are stated below for adults with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and children with type 1 diabetes. In addition, the International Diabetes Federation's target ranges for people without diabetes is stated. [19] [89] [90] The table provides general guidance. An individual target set by your healthcare team is the one you should aim for. NICE recommended target blood glucose level ranges Target Levels by Type Upon waking Before meals (pre prandial) At least 90 minutes after meals (post prandial) Non-diabetic* 4.0 to 5.9 mmol/L under 7.8 mmol/L Type 2 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L under 8.5 mmol/L Type 1 diabetes 5 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L Children w/ type 1 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L *The non-diabetic figures are provided for information but are not part of NICE guidelines. Normal and diabetic blood sugar ranges For the majority of healthy ind Continue reading >>

What Is The Normal Range For Blood Sugar Levels, And What Blood Sugar Level Constitutes A True Emergency?

What Is The Normal Range For Blood Sugar Levels, And What Blood Sugar Level Constitutes A True Emergency?

Question:What is the normal range for blood sugar levels, and what blood sugar level constitutes a true emergency? Answer:Now, in a normal individual we measure blood sugar under different circumstances. What we call fasting blood sugar or blood glucose levels is usually done six to eight hours after the last meal. So it's most commonly done before breakfast in the morning; and the normal range there is 70 to 100 milligrams per deciliter. Now when you eat a meal, blood sugar generally rises and in a normal individual it usually does not get above a 135 to 140 milligrams per deciliter. So there is a fairly narrow range of blood sugar throughout the entire day. Now in our diabetic patients we see both low blood sugar levels that we call hypoglycemia, or elevated blood sugars, hyperglycemia. Now, if the blood sugar drops below about 60 or 65 milligrams per deciliter, people will generally get symptoms, which are some shakiness, feeling of hunger, maybe a little racing of the heart and they will usually be trenchant or if they eat something, it goes away right away. But if blood sugar drops below 50 and can get down as low as 40 or 30 or even 20, then there is a progressive loss of mental function and eventually unconsciousness and seizures. And of course that is very dangerous and a medical emergency. On the other side, if blood sugar gets up above 180 to 200, then it exceeds the capacity of the kidneys to reabsorb the glucose and we begin to spill glucose into the urine. And if it gets way up high, up in the 400s or even 500s, it can be associated with some alteration in mental function. And in this situation, if it persists for a long time, we can actually see mental changes as well. So either too low or very exceedingly high can cause changes in mental function. Next: W Continue reading >>

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

No matter what we're doing — even when we're sleeping — our brains depend on glucose to function. Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and it's carried to each cell through the bloodstream. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia (pronounced: hi-po-gly-SEE-me-uh). Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that need to be treated right away. People with diabetes can have low blood sugar levels because of the medicines they have to take to manage their diabetes. They may need a hormone called insulin or diabetes pills (or both) to help their bodies use the sugar in their blood. These medicines help take the sugar out of the blood and get it into the body's cells, which makes the level of sugar in the blood go down. But sometimes it's a tricky balancing act and blood sugar levels can get too low. People with diabetes need to keep their blood sugars from getting too high or too low. Part of keeping blood sugar levels in a healthy range is having good timing, and balancing when and what they eat and when they exercise with when they take medicines. Some things that can make low blood sugar levels more likely to happen are: skipping meals and snacks not eating enough food at a meal or snack exercising longer or harder than usual without eating some extra food getting too much insulin not timing the insulin doses properly with meals, snacks, and exercise Also, certain things may increase how quickly insulin gets absorbed into the bloodstream and can make hypoglycemia more likely to occur. For example, taking a hot shower Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

You'll need to test your blood sugar if you think you have hypoglycemia.(ARTIGA PHOTO/CORBIS)Although type 2 diabetes is characterized by blood sugar that is too high, some people take insulin and others medications (such as sulfonylureas) that can occasionally drive blood sugar too low. When blood sugar is too lowgenerally less than 70 mg/dLit's called hypoglycemia, and it can become a medical emergency. (The normal range for fasting blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL, though it varies somewhat with age, and is lower during pregnancy and in children.) You can lose consciousness Hypoglycemia is more likely to occur when you start taking a new medication (it can take practice to match your food intake to your insulin dose, for example) or if you exercise more than usual. As blood sugar drops to low levels, you may feel: Shaky Irritable Sweaty This can occur within 10 to 15 minutes, and in extreme cases you can even lose consciousness and experience seizures if you don't consume some glucose (though hypoglycemia is usually mild in people with type 2 diabetes, and readily fixed by drinking juice or eating other sugar-containing items, such as glucose tablets or four to six pieces of hard candy). Hypoglycemia"My blood sugar was really plummeting" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring You'll need to test your blood sugar to confirm that you're having hypoglycemiasome people become irritable if blood sugar is too high, so it's not always obvious. If you drink sugar-containing juice, or some other form of carbohydrate, it should bring blood sugar back into the normal range. You can also purchase glucose pills or gels in the pharmacy that can get blood sugar back on track. “You should always have a glucose source in the car,” says Yvonne Thigpen, RD, diabetes program coor Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

What is hypoglycemia? People who have diabetes and use insulin or diabetes pills can have low blood sugar (glucose). Low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia, happens when the level of sugar in the blood falls below 70 mg/dl. Blood sugar drops when there is more insulin than needed to regulate the sugar level. What are the causes of hypoglycemia? Eating meals late or skipping meals. Not eating the whole meal or enough carbohydrates. Being more active than usual. Taking more medicine than needed. Drinking alcohol without eating. Any combination of the above. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? Weakness or shaking. Moist skin, sweating. Fast heartbeat. Dizziness. Sudden hunger. Confusion. Pale skin. Numbness in mouth or tongue. Irritability, nervousness. Unsteadiness. Nightmares, bad dreams, restless sleep. You might pass out if your hypoglycemia is not treated. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Glucose) In Non-diabetic People

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Glucose) In Non-diabetic People

What is hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose)? Hypoglycaemia or low blood glucose is a condition in which the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood, drops below a certain point (about 2.5mmol/l). The condition manifests itself by a number of symptoms that usually disappear 10 to 15 minutes after eating sugar. People differ slightly in the exact level of blood glucose at which they begin to feel symptoms of low blood sugar. Insulin is normally produced in the pancreas and helps the cells in the body absorb glucose from the blood. Normally, the glucose level rises after a meal. Too much insulin in the blood and other diseases can cause hypoglycaemic episodes (also known as 'hypos'). What can cause hypoglycaemic episodes in non-diabetic patients? Too much insulin in the blood: reactive hypoglycaemia (see below) a tumour – very often benign – in the insulin-producing pancreas. This is a very rare condition indeed Other diseases: a disease in the adrenal glands (Addison's disease) a weakened pituitary gland a severe reduction in liver function patients who have had their stomach removed fasting, malnutrition Reactive hypoglycaemia is possibly the most common reason for hypoglycaemia in non-diabetics but is often overdiagnosed. This form of hypoglycaemia is probably caused by an overproduction of insulin from the pancreas after a large meal with a lot of carbohydrates. The insulin can still be detected even after several hours, although the level should be back to normal at this time. This condition is probably most common in overweight people and those with Type 2 diabetes, where the large demand for insulin can sometimes cause too much insulin to be produced in the pancreas. There is some evidence to suggest that reactive hypoglycaemia can precede Type 2 diabetes. What happ Continue reading >>

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