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What Is The Liquid Glucose?

Glucose Syrup Manufacturers, Liquid Glucose Exporters India | Hl Agro

Glucose Syrup Manufacturers, Liquid Glucose Exporters India | Hl Agro

Liquid Glucose or Corn Syrup is a purified aqueous solution of nutritive saccharides obtained from starch. Hygienically processed and packed, the liquid glucose at HL Agro are quality tested on well-defined parameters before being delivered to the worldwide markets. Liquid Glucose is one of the popular food additives and ingredients in most countries.Corn Syrup or liquid glucose is made from high-quality corn starch by subjecting starch to high temperature in the presence of acids under strict quality control. A series of two enzymatic reactions are used to convert the cornstarch to corn syrup. Its major uses in commercially-prepared foods are as a thickener and sweetener. It has moisture-retaining (humectant) properties, which keep foods moist and help to maintain freshness. As a leading manufacturer & supplier of liquid glucose, HL Agro addresses the food additive needs of the baking & confectionery industries on a global scale. Technically, glucose syrup is any liquid starch hydrolysate of mono, di, and higher saccharide, and can be made from any sources of starch; maize, wheat, rice and potatoes are the most common sources. The viscosity and sweetness of the syrup depends on the extent to which the hydrolysis reaction has been carried out. To distinguish different grades of syrup, they are rated according to their dextrose equivalent (DE). Trusted Manufacturer & Exporters of Liquid Glucose Syrups - HL Agro As a noted manufacturer & exporter of corn products, HL Agro impresses the global markets by consistently delivering the high-quality liquid glucose syrups for use in different industries.At HL Agro, the manufacturing process employs state-of- the-art acidic hydrolysis which ensures superior product quality, tailored to meet the end user requirements. Our liquid Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose In A Cake

Liquid Glucose In A Cake

Asked by saramalouisduke. Answered on 5th February 2012 When making a Chocolate Fruit Cake, at what stage should I add liquid glucose and how should I add it? Liquid glucose, often referred to as glucose syrup, is a liquid form of simple sugar. It tends to keep products soft and moist so is often used in icings (such as royal icing) to stop them from becoming hard and sometimes in baking to keep products soft and moist. In most domestic baking it would be more common to use invert sugars such as golden syrup, corn syrup or clear/runny honey to add moisture to baked goods (invert sugars usually contain glucose and also fructose). These products are easier to find and are usually sold in larger quantities than liquid glucose. Liquid glucose used to be sold only in pharmacies but now it is often sold by cake decorating specialists or in the baking section in supermarkets. As the liquid glucose is a sugar it would normally be added to the cake whenever any other sugar is added. For a classic cake recipe it would be at the beginning, when butter and sugar are creamed together. If the cake is made by melting ingredients together then the glucose would be added to the melting mixture. We would suggest that you try Nigella's Incredibly Easy Chocolate Fruit Cake from Christmas (p180). This contains honey instead of liquid glucose and is very easy to make. Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose - The Answer To Perfect Ice-cream And More | Azelia's Kitchen

Liquid Glucose - The Answer To Perfect Ice-cream And More | Azelia's Kitchen

Liquid Glucose The Answer to Perfect Ice-Cream and More I think it was reading about Heston Blumenthal opening up a restaurant in London where his famous liquid nitrogen ice-cream will be served that jolted this quest of mine; how to make ice-cream at home that stays soft. After reading Kavey spost about an ice-cream shop in Camden Town, London, serving liquid nitrogen ice-cream, it seems theres a desire for supersoft textured ice-cream. Yes, liquid nitrogen makes super-duper soft ice-cream but whats the answer for the home cook? What about the rest of us? Go and purchase yourself a little bottle of liquid glucose, its adult and child-safeurmunless small child gets their little fingers into the sticky icky jar and runs fingers on your furniture! This post on liquid glucose is a follow up from Ice-Cream or Sorbet Too Firm in the Freezer? post where I searched into the problem of home ice-cream freezing too solid in the freezer and discovering the answer was liquid glucose, but I wanted to know more about the effect this inverted sugar has in ice-cream, why it helps to maintain it soft. Its sugar that has been boiled down with some water and a little acid until its thick and syrup like, it can take as little as 15 mins, at that point it becomes inverted sugar. What makes inverted sugar special is that once it gets to the broken-molecule down stage it cant go back to its former self, its molecules have been broken down to the extent they cant re-form and crystallise, it stays runny, thick and in syrup state. Think of any syrup like golden syrup by Tate & Lyle, molasses or corn syrup and thats what they are. It can be made from cane as golden syrup is, or potato, rice or wheat starch. In the US cornstarch seems the most popular choice. The other interesting thing about inv Continue reading >>

Is Corn Syrup Really The Same Thing As Liquid Glucose?

Is Corn Syrup Really The Same Thing As Liquid Glucose?

Is Corn Syrup Really The Same Thing As Liquid Glucose? marknelliesmum Posted 24 Oct 2008 , 3:57pm Can someone please clarify this. Over here in the UK we don't have corn syrup (apparently you can get it in Harrods and Selfridges in London if you pay top whack for it ) So many recipes call for it - i did a google search and there is a recipe to make it on recipe czar but another site says it is just liquid glucose under a different name to comply with US food regulations or something. Can anyone tell me if this is true or at least a close substitute. Here's an explanation of the difference between corn syrup and glucose form Rose Beranbaum's "The Cake Bible": Glucose: Contains 15-19% water and is an invert sugar...it is manufactured in syrup form in varying concentrations...glucose with suitable concentration for baking is thicker than corn syrup. Corn Syrup: Contains 24% water....is made from glucose with fructose added to prevent crystallization...the major difference between glucose and corn syrup is the water content, if some of the water in the corn syrup is evaporated it can be used interchangeably. I don't know if these are equivalent in the UK, but it should help of you're using US based recipes. Sorry, I also meant to add that when I use glucose instead of Corn Syrup I increase the amount of liquid in the recipe ever so slightly...maybe by a few teaspoons or so and, conversely, reduce the amount of liquid when using corn syrup instead of glucose. I recently bought a DVD on cake decorating (from Jennifer Dontz - her CC username is JenniferMI... check out her cakes; they're STUNNING!). She makes chocolate fondant, which calls for corn syrup. I emailed her to ask if I could use glucose - as we can't get corn syrup here, but I thought they looked similar. She repli Continue reading >>

What Is Liquid Glucose?

What Is Liquid Glucose?

Two days ago, I was making ganache as a topping for cupcakes. I needed, as expected, cream and chocolate. But '1 teaspoon of liquid glucose' was also on the list of ingredients (for 12 cupcakes). I didn't think I had that, so I used 'fondant sugar' (powder sugar with a bit of water, described here as poured fondant). Is liquid glucose something specific you can buy in stores, or is it a collection name for all kinds of sweet, liquid stuff (honey, syrup, fondant etc.)? If it's something specific, can you make it at home as well? And yet another question: if I would have added (powdered) sugar to my cream, would I have accomplished ganache as well (after being poured over chocolate), since I think the sugar would dissolve in the cream? (Just to be complete: my ganache was fine.) First of all- glucose is a different sugar than table sugar. Corn syrup in the US is similar but has a few extra compounds. As far as I can tell it is used for similar reasons as liquid glucose in the EU. when making candy a little corn syrup can be added to the sugar solution to prevent crystallization. in the US at least, it is much cheaper than cane sugar. You can buy it in stores here- I can't say whether you can in Belgium. I have, on occasion, been forced to use a very thick sugar syrup in place of corn syrup. The recipe used the syrup for reason #1 above and turned out well. If it had been in there for reason #2 it would have been less successful. In general, if you can find it, it is probably better to buy than to make a substitute because of reason #3. Arabic gum is actually a real thing, and an ingredient that would not be in liquid glucose. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gum_arabic ...and... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose_syrup Jolenealaska Jan 11 '14 at 5:49 I believe you're actually describing Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose | Definition Of Liquid Glucose By Medical Dictionary

Liquid Glucose | Definition Of Liquid Glucose By Medical Dictionary

Liquid glucose | definition of liquid glucose by Medical dictionary Also found in: Dictionary , Thesaurus , Encyclopedia . a pharmaceutic aid consisting of dextrose, dextrins, maltose, and water, obtained by the incomplete hydrolysis of starch. a thick, syrupy, odorless and colorless or yellowish liquid obtained by the incomplete hydrolysis of starch, primarily consisting of dextrose with dextrins, maltose, and water. It is used as a flavoring agent and may be used as a calorie source, chiefly in treating dehydration. Pharmaceutic aid consisting of dextrose, dextrins, maltose, and water, obtained by the incomplete hydrolysis of starch. Pharmaceutic aid consisting of dextrose, dextrins, maltose, and water, obtained by incomplete hydrolysis of starch. a simple sugar, a monosaccharide in certain foodstuffs, especially fruit, and in normal blood; the major source of energy for many living organisms. See also dextrose . Glucose, whose molecular formula is C6H12O6, is the end product of carbohydrate digestion; other monosaccharides (fructose and galactose) are largely converted into glucose. Glucose is the only monosaccharide present in significant amounts in the body fluids. The oxidation of glucose produces energy for the body cells; the rate of metabolism is controlled by a number of hormones the most important of which are insulin and glucagon. Glucose that is not needed for energy is stored in the form of glycogen as a source of potential energy, readily available when needed. Most of the glycogen is stored in the liver and muscle cells. When these and other body cells are saturated with glycogen, the excess glucose is converted into fat and stored as adipose tissue. See also hypoglycemia , hyperglycemia . a thick syrupy, sweet liquid, consisting chiefly of dextrose, wi Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose Glossary | Recipes With Liquid Glucose | Tarladalal.com

Liquid Glucose Glossary | Recipes With Liquid Glucose | Tarladalal.com

Liquid Glucose Glossary | Recipes with Liquid Glucose | Tarladalal.com _ Liquid glucose is a combination of various saccharides or simple carbohydrates extracted with strict quality control parameters and then subjected to a refining and vacuum evaporation process. It comprises glucose, maltose, maltodextrin and oligosaccharides, which might be in mono, di, tri, penta or higher saccharide form. The solution can be transparent to viscous aqueous and light yellow to colourless. It is very versatile and can be used in a wide range of cooking applications. Liquid glucose improves the form, gives body and texture to the finished products. It is especially used for hard candies. It also imparts resistance to discolouration, moisture formation and crystallisation, thus producing products which have exceptional clarity, stability and brilliance. Liquid glucose should not be confused with corn syrup. Corn syrup is specially prepared syrup obtained by the conversion of acid enzyme and contains a more complex sugar called dextrin. Liquid glucose is available only in select food malls and supermarkets. You can also buy it online directly from manufacturers like the Goodrich World, Ridhi Sidhi products, Dr. Oetkar's Liquid Glucose, etc. Check the date of packaging and buy the latest one. It is available in re-sealable plastic jars of 140 gram packing or even in glass jars with glass lids. It is used as a major ingredient in hard-boiled candies as it prevents crystallization and imparts cohesiveness. Liquid glucose is used in conjunction with sugar for manufacturing flavoured candies and chocolates. It is used in the preparation of glucose biscuits. It helps keep food products soft and fresh and acts as a preservative. Hence, it is widely uses in Jams, jellies, chewing gums and cann Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose Substitutes

Liquid Glucose Substitutes

Corn syrup is a type of liquid glucose.Photo Credit: Jupiterimages/PHOTOS.com>>/Getty Images Liquid glucose, sometimes called glucose syrup, is a liquid sweetener used to keep icings and baked goods moist and soft. A number of other liquid sweeteners can be used in a 1-to-1 replacement if you don't have liquid glucose, although the end product may taste somewhat different depending on which sweetener you use. Corn syrup is probably one of the best replacements for glucose syrup. It's actually a form of glucose syrup, which can be made from any number of starchy foods, including corn, potatoes or wheat. In the United States, corn syrup is one of the most readily available types of glucose syrup. Light corn syrup is a better replacement than dark corn syrup because the flavor isn't as strong. It has 62 calories and about 17 grams of sugar per tablespoon. Golden syrup is a liquid sweetener more commonly used in the United Kingdom and the Caribbean than in the United States. It's a little thicker and darker in color than glucose or corn syrup and has a stronger flavor, but still makes a good substitute. It's also called cane syrup, cane juice and light treacle. Each tablespoon has 56 calories and about 15 grams of sugar. If you don't have glucose syrup or corn syrup available, you can make a substitute at home. One option is cane sugar syrup, made by mixing granulated cane sugar with water and a small amount of cream of tartar and salt. Cane syrup has about 56 calories and 15 grams of sugar per tablespoon. Another option is to make simple syrup, which is a mix of two parts sugar and one part water heated until the sugar is totally dissolved in the water. Other liquid sweeteners can also be used with varying results. Honey is sweeter than corn syrup and glucose syrup, and m Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose

Liquid Glucose

ok so I wanna try a new reicpe. but it says I must use liquid glucose. That which comes into existence will eventually break apart and pass away "The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is." nvm, found out I must phone a shop that stocks baking supplies I phoned my fav (local) pharmacy. They do stock it, but it'll cost me R33 for 500g. whereas another shop doer on the otherside of pta has 3kg for R44. will first experiment with stock from the pharmacy, before I buy it from the other ppl. Just in case I don't like the taste. HC, can you post the recipe please? I highly doubt that you'll have to buy glucose in its raw form - glucose is just a type of sugar... Where did the recipe come from. IIRC some places refer to corn syrup as liquid glucose. "Le mieux est l'ennemi du bien." FM Arouet "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." Edmund Burke "Never argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you with experience" Unknown Even duct tape cant fix stupid but it can muffle the sound We had a recipe for nougat call for liquid glucose and we also just bought it from the pharmacy. Can't recall the price. it is out of a book called: Chocolates and home made sweets by Cheryl Seymour White, milk or dark chocolate can be turned into modelling paste. The whites can be coloured with food colouring to suit your needs. Cake decorators will find that this chocolate paste can be used to make any of the flowers normally formed with modelling paste. Utilisation of chocolate modelling paste does not end with flowers - the extent of your imagination is the only limit. 1. Warm glucose in doible boiler until it is lukewarm. 2. Melt chocolate in another double boiler until it Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose - Definition Of Liquid Glucose By The Free Dictionary

Liquid Glucose - Definition Of Liquid Glucose By The Free Dictionary

Liquid glucose - definition of liquid glucose by The Free Dictionary Also found in: Thesaurus , Medical , Encyclopedia . 1. A monosaccharide sugar, C6H12O6, that is used by living things to obtain energy through the process of aerobic respiration within cells. It is the principal circulating sugar in the blood of humans and other mammals. 2. A colorless to yellowish syrupy mixture of dextrose, maltose, and dextrins containing about 20 percent water, used in confectionery, alcoholic fermentation, tanning, and treating tobacco. Also called starch syrup. 1. (Elements & Compounds) a white crystalline monosaccharide sugar that has several optically active forms, the most abundant being dextrose: a major energy source in metabolism. Formula: C6H12O6 2. (Elements & Compounds) a yellowish syrup (or, after desiccation, a solid) containing dextrose, maltose, and dextrin, obtained by incomplete hydrolysis of starch: used in confectionery, fermentation, etc [C19: from French, from Greek gleukos sweet wine; related to Greek glukus sweet] 1. a simple sugar, C6H12O6, that is a product of photosynthesis and is the principal source of energy for all living organisms: concentrated in fruits and honey or readily obtainable from starch, other carbohydrates, or glycogen. 2. a syrup containing dextrose, maltose, and dextrine, obtained by the incomplete hydrolysis of starch. A crystalline sugar having the formula C6H12O6, found in plant and animal tissue and essential to the animal diet. It is transported by blood and lymph to all the cells of the body, where it is broken down to produce ATP, the main source of energy for cellular processes. (or dextrose) A simple sugar: the form of carbohydrate absorbed from the alimentary canal, supplied by blood to the muscles and converted for storage to Continue reading >>

How Do I Use Glucose Syrup/liquid Glucose When Baking Cakes, Specifically Victoria Sponge, Choc Fudge And Carrot Cake?

How Do I Use Glucose Syrup/liquid Glucose When Baking Cakes, Specifically Victoria Sponge, Choc Fudge And Carrot Cake?

Hi HalfPint, thank you for your reply, It was for a Chocolate Fudge Cake, ingredients are: sugar, wheat flour, vegetable oil, margarine, cocoa powder, glucose syrup, egg, salt, whey solids (not sure what this is either!?) and sweetened condensed milk. There are no quantities but I think she makes a 12" cake in 2 layers. I'm just guessing here: I think the glucose is to make the texture of the cake fudgey. I don't think you can omit it without affecting the texture of the finished product. Might be able to substitute with corn syrup, I think you use less of it (I'm just not sure how much). Whey solids are milk protein. Used in baking for clean taste, added texture, increased protein and longer shelf life ( ) Hi PieceofLayerCake, Thank you for your advice, very interesting. I feel I am getting caught up in thinking about emulating my customers previous supplier which is silly. I need to keep telling myself my business is Homemade cakes, emphasis on HOMEMADE. I think I need to reinforce that with my customer, tell them they may need to adjust their prices slightly because they are going from a large established family company (30 years old) to me in my kitchen just starting out. I don't want to start messing around with preservatives/additives for shelf-life, it's not what I am about. PieceofLayerCake is a trusted source on baking. Something I've learned over the years is to communicate your principles and your mission with you customers and STICK to them. If people know what to expect, they won't be disappointed when you deliver on that expectation. But, if you're wishy washy or vague....they will take advantage of that...to your disadvantage. Things like policies, recipes, flavors (I don't use raisins, I just don't), aesthetics, time limits (cake orders are to be 48 hou Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose - Sukhjit

Liquid Glucose - Sukhjit

Liquid glucose molecular formula C6 H12 O6 also known as corn syrup is a fundamental ingredient in many food and industrial products it is a purified concentrated aqueous solution of nutritive saccharides obtained from starch. The solids are composed of various carbohydrates such as dextrose, maltose and higher saccharides, the different carbohydrate profiles compiled with various available solids levels give liquid glucose its unique functionalities. The quality of liquid glucose has a direct impact on the quality and performance of the finished product. Liquid glucose is used in almost every type of confection, particularly hard candies. It is primarily used to control sucrose and dextrose crystallization in confections. Candies made out or sucrose alone are subject to Crystallization and may crumble. Liquid glucose performs to bring out the delicate flavour in candies. Liquid glucose provides a smooth body and smooth texture to Ice Cream and other frozen desserts. It helps to eliminate the graining or crystallization that can be objectionable to mouth fed, liquid glucose also impart a firmer, heavier body to Ice creams. Liquid glucose acts as a stabilizer and improves the shelf life of the product. It helps to reduce the freezing point thereby reducing the manufacturers freeze time and improving the freezer capacity. Adjuncts are used to supplement malted barley in brewing and liquid glucose has a number of advantages as an adjunct, it is completely soluble and economical, easy to handle and adaptable .liquid glucose is ideal for high gravity brewing techniques which increases the overall brew house efficiency and yield. Liquid glucose is an economical source of fermentable solids and a popular choice in the baking industry it not only provides sweetness and density Continue reading >>

Liquid Sugars Part 1: Liquid Glucose

Liquid Sugars Part 1: Liquid Glucose

Home > Liquid Sugars Part 1: Liquid Glucose Liquid glucose, like powdered glucose, has a doctoring effect on your confections. That is, it prevents crystallization of sucrose, keeping the texture of your pieces smooth for longer. The benefit to using liquid glucose over solid is that it imparts a longer tooth to your pieces it adds an elasticity that is not present when you use powdered glucose. The downside to using liquid glucose over solid is that it has a higher water content, so there is less ability for it to manage your shelf life by controlling water content. I love to use liquid glucose in some ganaches when I want a slightly chewier texture for example, in this recipe for a caramel ganache it is based on burnt sugar and cream, but the addition of glucose really gives the consumer a caramel sensation. Caramel Milk Chocolate Ganache (adapted from Peter Grewelings book Chocolates & Confections ) Heat the cream to scalding. In the meantime, wet the sugar slightly and cook it to a deep amber colour. Deglaze carefully with the hot cream. ATTENTION: this deglazing can be very dangerous! Pour the cream slowly and wear protective heat proof gloves. Stir in the liquid glucose and allow the mixture to cool to 40 degrees Celsius. Pour liquid tempered chocolate into a food processor, and then pour the warm cream mixture over it and blend until emulsified. Pour into a frame and allow to crystallize over night. Cut and enrobe the next day, and I like to garnish mine with maple glazed pecans (the recipe for thesecoming soon!) Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * If you have questions about our Ecole Chocolat programs, please email us at [email protected] and we will be happy to give you a quick answer. Please dont post questions in the Continue reading >>

Uses & Applications Of Liquid Glucose From India | Hl Agro

Uses & Applications Of Liquid Glucose From India | Hl Agro

Liquid Glucose is the syrup form of glucose which is a sugar and is one of the derivatives of corn starch or maize starch. Also known as glucose syrup or confectioners syrup, this derivative is made from the hydrolysis of starch. Liquid glucose which consists of more than 90% glucose is used in industrial fermentation but it is important to know that the syrups used in confectionery may consist of different amounts of maltose, glucose, and higher oligosaccharides and may have about 10-43% of glucose content. Liquid glucose uses and benefits are multifarious across the board and to know about a few, you can go through the following given information. The first and major benefit of liquid glucose is that it acts as a flavour enhancer in candies and other kinds of foods. Another important application of the corn syrupis that it helps in controlling sucrose and dextrose crystallization in confections. It is primarily used in hard candies since candies that are made using sucrose alone are treated to crystallization and may be brittle. Liquid glucose also finds use as a stabilizer and can greatly enhance the shelf life of certain products. What it does is that it helps in reducing the freezing point and therefore reduces the manufacturers freeze time. It also improves the freezer capacity. Yet amongst the important liquid glucose uses is that it acts as a texture enhancer and may lend a smooth texture and body to products ice creams and other types of frozen desserts. Basically what glucose syrup does is that it aids in the elimination of graining. Another important application of Indian liquid glucose is that it acts as an economical source of fermentable solids and is thus a popular product in the baking industry. Not only does it provide density control to bakery items b Continue reading >>

Glucose Syrup - Wikipedia

Glucose Syrup - Wikipedia

Glucose syrup, also known as confectioner's glucose, is a syrup made from the hydrolysis of starch . Glucose is a sugar . Maize (corn) is commonly used as the source of the starch in the US, in which case the syrup is called " corn syrup ", but glucose syrup is also made from potatoes and wheat , and less often from barley , rice and cassava . [1] p.21 [2] Glucose syrup containing over 90% glucose is used in industrial fermentation , [3] but syrups used in confectionery contain varying amounts of glucose , maltose and higher oligosaccharides , depending on the grade, and can typically contain 10% to 43% glucose. [4] Glucose syrup is used in foods to sweeten, soften texture and add volume. By converting some of the glucose in corn syrup into fructose (using an enzymatic process), a sweeter product, high fructose corn syrup can be produced. Depending on the method used to hydrolyse the starch and on the extent to which the hydrolysis reaction has been allowed to proceed, different grades of glucose syrup are produced, which have different characteristics and uses. The syrups are broadly categorised according to their dextrose equivalent (DE). The further the hydrolysis process proceeds, the more reducing sugars are produced, and the higher the DE. Depending on the process used, glucose syrups with different compositions, and hence different technical properties, can have the same DE. The original glucose syrups were manufactured by acid hydrolysis of corn starch at high temperature and pressure. The typical product had a DE of 42, but quality was variable due to the difficulty of controlling the reaction. Higher DE syrups made by acid hydrolysis tend to have a bitter taste and a dark colour, due to the production of hydroxymethylfurfural and other byproducts. [1] p.26 Th Continue reading >>

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