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What Is The Difference Between Glucose And Fructose?

Difference Between Glucose And Fructose

Difference Between Glucose And Fructose

Key Difference: The term glucose is derived from the Greek, glukus, meaning sweet. Glucose is also known as D-glucose, dextrose, or grape sugar is found in plants and it is a byproduct of photosynthesis and fuels for cellular respiration. Glucose is used as energy by living organisms. Fructose is also known as fruit sugar, as it naturally and most commonly occurs in fruits and plants. Sugars are categorized as carbohydrates, which are a group of compounds made up of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Carbohydrates, and in turn sugars, are the source of chemical energy for living organisms, including humans. Sugars are categorized as monosaccharide, disaccharides and polysaccharides. Monosaccharides are the simplest carbohydrate type, composed of a single molecule. These include glucose, galactose, and fructose. Disaccharides are made up of two molecules. The table sugar, also known as sucrose, most commonly used by humans, is a type of disaccharide. Other disaccharides include maltose and lactose. The term glucose is derived from the Greek, glukus, meaning sweet. The suffix -ose denotes that it is a sugar. Glucose is also known as D-glucose, dextrose, or grape sugar is found in plants and it is a byproduct of photosynthesis and fuels for cellular respiration. Photosynthesis is the process where the plants produce their own food using carbon dioxide, water and sunlight. It is a dietary carbohydrate that is directly absorbed in the bloodstream during digestion. In living organisms such as humans, plants and animals, glucose is used as a body fuel and energy. Excess glucose is stored in the form of glycogen in animals and humans and in the form of starch in plants. Glucose is an important part an organisms diet, which is used by an organism for growth and development. Use of gl Continue reading >>

Fructose Vs. Glucose And Metabolism: Do The Metabolic Differences Matter?

Fructose Vs. Glucose And Metabolism: Do The Metabolic Differences Matter?

1. Curr Opin Lipidol. 2014 Feb;25(1):8-19. doi: 10.1097/MOL.0000000000000042. Fructose vs. glucose and metabolism: do the metabolic differences matter? Sievenpiper JL(1), de Souza RJ, Cozma AI, Chiavaroli L, Ha V, Mirrahimi A. (1)aToronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto bDepartment of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University cDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton dDepartment of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto eSchool of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Fructose is seen as uniquely contributing to the pandemics of obesity and its cardiometabolic complications. Much of the evidence for this viewderives from the unique biochemical, metabolic, and endocrine responses thatdifferentiate fructose from glucose. To understand whether these proposedmechanisms result in clinically meaningful modification of cardiovascular risk inhumans, we update a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of controlled feeding trials to assess the cardiometabolic effects of fructose in isocaloricreplacement for glucose.RECENT FINDINGS: A total of 20 controlled feeding trials (n = 344) haveinvestigated the effect of fructose in/on cardiometabolic endpoints. Pooledanalyses show that although fructose may increase total cholesterol, uric acid,and postprandial triglycerides in isocaloric replacement for glucose, it does notappear to be any worse than glucose in its effects on other aspects of the lipid profile, insulin, or markers of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Continue reading >>

Evidence Shows Some Sugars Are Worse Than Others; Fructose Tops The List

Evidence Shows Some Sugars Are Worse Than Others; Fructose Tops The List

Evidence Shows Some Sugars Are Worse Than Others; Fructose Tops the List Written by Cameron Scott on January 29, 2015 Are all sugars created equal, or are some more likely to cause obesity and related diseases, including type 2 diabetes? A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2004 proposed that the growing use of high-fructose corn syrup as a sweetener in processed foods could be linked to ballooning rates of obesity. It launched a long, contentious scientific debate. A recently published paper in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings wont settle the issue, but it does pose a significant new challenge to those who believe that a sugar is a sugar is a sugar. The comprehensive literature review claims to show for the first time that, calorie for calorie, added sugars especially fructose are more damaging to the bodys metabolic systems than other carbohydrates and are more likely to lead to type 2 diabetes and obesity. Forty percent of all American adults have some sort of insulin resistance, said James DiNicolantonio, PharmD, an associate editor at BMJ Open Heart, who co-authored the paper with Dr. Sean Lucan of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. The paper argues that the most current guidelines for how much added sugar is safe to eat are grossly exaggerated. It suggests that just 5 to 10 percent of our total caloric intake should come from added sugar. That comes out to about 22 grams of sugar about half as much as a single can of soda. Related News: Soda Linked to Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic Why fructose, and why added sugar? All carbohydrates contain glucose. Some foods, notably fruits, also contain fructose. Fructose is sweeter than glucose, so its most often used as an added sugar in processed foods, whether in the form of high-fructose corn syr Continue reading >>

Fructose Vs. Glucose

Fructose Vs. Glucose

While fructose and glucose have the same calorific value, the two sugars are metabolized differently in the body. Fructose has a lower glycemic index than glucose but has a much higher glycemic load. Fructose causes seven times as much cell damage as does glucose, because it binds to cellular proteins seven times faster; and it releases 100 times the number of oxygen radicals (such as hydrogen peroxide, which kills everything in sight).[1] Fructose is a simple sugar commonly found in fruits and vegetables. Vast quantities are also manufactured in the lab. Glucose, also known as grape or blood sugar, is present in all major carbohydrates like starch and table sugar. While both are a good source of energy, excess of glucose can be fatal to diabetic patients, and excess of fructose can lead to health problems like insulin resistance and liver disease. Comparison chart Source of energy. Often added to food and drinks to improve taste. Source of energy. Fuels cellular respiration. Photosynthesis, the breakdown of glycogen. Vast quantities produced artificially in the lab by the food industry. Photosynthesis, the breakdown of glycogen. Honey, flowers, berries, most root vegetables. All major carbohydrates Continue reading >>

Sugars: The Difference Between Fructose, Glucose And Sucrose

Sugars: The Difference Between Fructose, Glucose And Sucrose

29/06/2016 7:43 AM AEST | Updated 15/07/2016 12:56 PM AEST Sugars: The Difference Between Fructose, Glucose And Sucrose We're not just confused, we're also misinformed. "Fructose is the worst for you." "No way, sucrose is the devil." "I don't eat any sugar." Sugar is confusing. While some people only use certain types of sugars, others dismiss them completely. But is this necessary, or even grounded? To help settle the confusion, we spoke to Alan Barclay -- accredited practising dietitian, spokesperson for the Dietitians Association of Australia and Chief Scientific Officer at the Glycemic Index Foundation . "All the sugars are used as a source of fuel, but there are subtle differences in the way they are digested and absorbed," Barclay said. "In foods in Australia, the most common sugars are monosaccharides (glucose, fructose and galactose), but mostly these are occurring as disaccharides (which are sucrose, lactose and maltose)." Monosaccharides and disaccharides are two kinds of simple sugars, which are a form of carbohydrate. Oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, on the other hand, contain more sugar combinations and are known as complex carbohydrates -- for example, whole grain breads, brown rice and sweet potatoes. Monosaccharides require the least effort by the body to break down, meaning they are available for energy more quickly than disaccharides. "Monosaccharides don't require any digestion and can be absorbed into the mouth," Barclay said. "The problem there is they can cause dental caries which is one of the primary reasons why we need to be careful of how much added sugar we're consuming." Glucose -- the body's main source of energy and is found in fruit such as pasta, whole grain bread, legumes and a range of vegetables. Fructose -- this 'fruit sugar' fo Continue reading >>

Difference Between Glucose And Fructose

Difference Between Glucose And Fructose

Categorized under Science | Difference Between Glucose and Fructose While not everyone would classify themselves as sweet tooth, there are few people who would gladly give up all sugar from their diet. Sugar can take many forms but the most common are sucrose, glucose, and fructose. If one is searching for the lowest common denominator, there should then just be glucose and fructose because these two monosaccharides are the building blocks of sucrose. There are many similarities between glucose and fructose. They are both simple sugars, and are monosaccharides. Simple sugars contain only one type of carbohydrate as opposed to two like the disaccharide sucrose. The chemical formula for glucose and fructose are also the same: C6(H2O)6. Once they have entered the body, both sugars eventually make their way to the liver to be metabolized. Most processed and natural foods out there contain a combination of fructose and glucose. Even foods that you would expect to be nearly all fructose, such as high fructose corn syrup, actually have a 55%-45% composition in favor of fructose. There are a few key ways in which these two sugars differ though. While their chemical formula is the same, the molecules of glucose and fructose are laid out in different formations. They both start out by making a hexagon with their six carbon atoms. Each carbon is bound to a water molecule . Glucose is an aldohexose. Its carbon is attached to a hydrogen atom by a single bond and an oxygen atom by a double bond. Fructose is a ketohexose. Its carbon is attached only to an oxygen atom by a single bond. As aforementioned, both sugars end up in the liver. However, Glucose is eaten, absorbed into the blood stream, and makes it way to the liver where it is broken down to supply energy to the entire body. Continue reading >>

Sugar Explained

Sugar Explained

You've probably heard the terms fructose, glucose, lactose and sucrose before, and you may know that they're all types of sugar. But do you know how they differ from one another, or whether some are better for you than others? Use our handy guide to shed some light on the secrets of sugar... What are complex and simple carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are classified into two basic groups, complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates are composed of multiple simple sugars, joined together by chemical bonds. The more chains and branches of simple sugars, the more complex a carbohydrate is and in turn, the longer it takes to be broken down by the body and the less impact it has on blood sugar levels. Examples of complex carbohydrates include wholegrains such as jumbo oats, brown rice, spelt, rye and barley. Simple carbohydrates are either monosaccharides (one sugar molecule) or disaccharides (two sugar molecules). They are digested quickly and release sugars rapidly into the bloodstream. The two main monosaccharides are glucose and fructose. The two major disaccharides are sucrose (composed of glucose and fructose) and lactose (which is made up of galactose and glucose). Glucose What is glucose? Glucose is the primary source of energy your body uses and every cell relies on it to function. When we talk about blood sugar we are referring to glucose in the blood. When we eat carbohydrates, our body breaks them down into units of glucose. When blood glucose levels rise, cells in the pancreas release insulin, signalling cells to take up glucose from the blood. As the cells absorb sugar from the blood, levels start to drop. The nutritional profile of glucose The glycemic index is a ranking of how quickly foods make your blood sugar levels rise after eating them. High GI foods are very Continue reading >>

Difference Between Glucose, Fructose And Sucrose [closed]

Difference Between Glucose, Fructose And Sucrose [closed]

I know they are all forms of sugar, and your body needs them. OK, I do know that "Fructose is a natural sugar found in a variety of foods such as fruit, honey and vegetables." What is normal sugar then, like the stuff you buy from the shops to put in your coffee? closed as off topic by michael , Matt Chan Aug 30 '12 at 2:29 Questions on Physical Fitness Stack Exchange are expected to relate to physical fitness within the scope defined by the community . Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center , please edit the question . Nutrition topics unrelated to physical fitness or exercise is considered off-topic according to our faq . Matt Chan Aug 30 '12 at 2:30 Glucose and Fructose are monosaccharides , the simplest forms of sugars that your body can use directly. Sucrose and high fructose corn syrup are disaccharides , or a larger more complex compound of glucose and fructose. Sucrose, the type of table sugar from sugar cane or beet sugar, is 50% fructose and 50% glucose. High fructose corn syrup is a manufactured sugar that is engineered to certain ratios: HFCS 90: 90% fructose to 10% glucose--usually used to blend with HFCS 42 to make HFCS 55 The health concerns usually revolve around the level of fructose more than glucose. For example fructose malabsorption is fairly common. Most commonly, the biggest concern is a link between fructose and visceral fat levels. Visceral fat is the fat below the muscle surface packed between your organs. Too much visceral fat will cascade into several health disorders. This is primarily a concern because we have radically increased our fr Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose?

What Is The Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose?

What Is the Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose? Jamie Yacoub is a clinical outpatient Registered Dietitian, expert in nutrition and author of her cookbook "Modern Guide to Food and Eating: Low Glycemic Recipes". She obtained a Bachelor of Science in clinical nutrition from UC Davis and an MPH in nutrition from Loma Linda University. Yacoub then completed her dietetic internship as an intern for a Certified Specialist in sports nutrition and at a top-100 hospital. Small bowl of cubed sugar.Photo Credit: YelenaYemchuk/iStock/Getty Images Glucose and fructose are both monosaccharides -- simple sugar molecules. Sucrose is a disaccharide made up of two simple sugar molecules, a glucose molecule and a fructose molecule. Sucrose, glucose and fructose may taste similar in food sources such as fruit, honey and candy but are actually quite different. Sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup are major sources of fructose and glucose added to foods. Sucrose -- table sugar -- is equal parts fructose and glucose. HFCS is glucose and fructose mixed in different concentrations, the most common being 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose. HFCS is in soft drinks and pastries as well as many processed foods. Although too much of any sugar in your diet is not good, researchers of a review study published in 2013 in "Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism" suggest fructose is linked to metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical problems that increase your risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes when they occur together. HFCS is under scrutiny because manufacturers are not required to specify on food labels for general consumers how much fructose is in the concentration. Researchers of a study at the University of California Davis published in 2008 in "The American Journal o Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference In Structure Between Glucose And Fructose? - Quora

What Is The Difference In Structure Between Glucose And Fructose? - Quora

What is the difference in structure between glucose and fructose? Both are hexose sugars, i.e. have 6 carbons in their structure. However, glucose is an aldohexose, whereas fructose is a ketohexose. This means that the functional group present in these sugars is an aldehydic and a ketonic group respectively. I have highlighted the functional groups in these pictures of the linear structures of the two sugars. In nature, however, the linear chain structures exist in equilibrium with their cyclised forms. Here, another difference arises. Glucose forms a pyranose ring structure, whereas fructose makes a furan ring structure: Hence, glucose makes a six membered ring, and fructose makes a five membered ring. You can compare the ring structure with their linear chain structure here: Another difference is that in glucose, the anomeric carbon is the first carbon, whereas in fructose, the anomeric carbon is the second carbon. The anomeric carbon is the one containing the carbonyl group, which reacts to form the cyclised structure. 8.8k Views View Upvoters Not for Reproduction Originally Answered: What is the structure of fructose and glucose? Both fructose and glucose are 6 carbon (C6) hexoses but they have different structures. Other C6 sugars that humans can metabolize include mannose, trehalose and galactose Various 6 carbon sugars are able to enter glycolysis at various points. Sucrose is a dissachride of glucose and fructose while lactose is a disaacharide of glucose and galactose. This image shows structures of the major C6 sugars and how they are metabolized: 1. Galactose enters via a glycogen offshoot (Gal1P to G1P) . Two enzymes are involved; Galactose 1 phosphate UDP transferase (Gal1PUT) and Galactokinase. 2. Fructose kinase phosphorylates F to F1P 3. F1P aldolase (a Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Glucose-fructose And Fructose-glucose Syrups?

What Is The Difference Between Glucose-fructose And Fructose-glucose Syrups?

What is the difference between glucose-fructose and fructose-glucose syrups? What is the difference between glucose-fructose and fructose-glucose syrups? Just like table sugar (sucrose), glucose fructose and fructose-glucose syrups are also made up of glucose and fructose. While table sugar has a fixed proportion of 50% glucose and 50% fructose, the percentage of these molecules in syrups may vary. If a syrup contains more than 50% of fructose, it is called fructose-glucose syrup on the packaging. If there is less than 50% fructose in it, it is called glucose-fructose syrup. The typical fructose content of such syrups produced in Europe is 20, 30, and 42%. In the US, the most frequently used fructose content is 55% and these syrups are referred to as High Fructose Corn Syrups (HFCS). The syrups with the fructose content between 42% and 55% have a similar sweetness to table sugar, so this is why they are often used as alternatives to table sugar. The advantage of these syrups is that they come in a liquid form, unlike table sugar which is crystallised. Thus, they are easier to blend with other ingredients in creams, ice creams and drinks. Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose?

What Is The Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose?

Sucrose, glucose and fructose are important carbohydrates, commonly referred to as simple sugars. Sugar is found naturally in whole foods and is often added to processed foods to sweeten them and increase flavor. Your tongue can't quite distinguish between these sugars, but your body can tell the difference. They all provide the same amount of energy per gram, but are processed and used differently throughout the body. Structure Simple carbohydrates are classified as either monosaccharides or disaccharides. Monosaccharides are the simplest, most basic units of carbohydrates and are made up of only one sugar unit. Glucose and fructose are monosaccharides and are the building blocks of sucrose, a disaccharide. Thus, disaccharides are just a pair of linked sugar molecules. They are formed when two monosaccharides are joined together and a molecule of water is removed -- a dehydration reaction. The most important monosaccharide is glucose, the body’s preferred energy source. Glucose is also called blood sugar, as it circulates in the blood, and relies on the enzymes glucokinase or hexokinase to initiate metabolism. Your body processes most carbohydrates you eat into glucose, either to be used immediately for energy or to be stored in muscle cells or the liver as glycogen for later use. Unlike fructose, insulin is secreted primarily in response to elevated blood concentrations of glucose, and insulin facilitates the entry of glucose into cells. Fructose is a sugar found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, and added to various beverages such as soda and fruit-flavored drinks. However, it is very different from other sugars because it has a different metabolic pathway and is not the preferred energy source for muscles or the brain. Fructose is only metabolized in the li Continue reading >>

The Difference In How Fructose And Glucose Affect Your Body

The Difference In How Fructose And Glucose Affect Your Body

My regular readers know that I consider agave to be a BIG enemy to health and beauty- which is very high in fructose (up to 97% fructose). It truly irks me that sly marketing makes the general public think agave is a “healthy” sweetener, and that it continues to be used in “health” products purported to be better than regular baked or other goods, as well as in many restaurants. It is not. There is a myth that exists that fructose is a “healthy” sugar while glucose is bad stuff. In fact, in recent years, there has been a rise in sweeteners that contain this “healthy” sugar, such as the dreaded agave nectar. I sincerely hope that this information (please help spread it!) makes more people aware of the differences in sugar types, and makes more people know to avoid agave at all costs. S.O.S: Save Our Skin!!! Fructose Fructose is one type of sugar molecule. It occurs naturally in fresh fruits, giving them their sweetness. Because of this, many people consider fructose “natural,” and assume that all fructose products are healthier than other types of sugar. Likewise, fructose has a low glycemic index, meaning it has minimal impact on blood glucose levels. This has made it a popular sweetener with people on low-carbohydrate and low-glycemic diets, which aim to minimize blood glucose levels in order to minimize insulin release. But the glycemic index is not the sole determining factor in whether a sweetener is “healthy” or desirable to use. Because fructose is very sweet, fruit contains relatively small amounts, providing your body with just a little bit of the sugar, which is very easily handled. If people continued to eat fructose only in fruit and occasionally honey as our ancestors did, the body would easily process it without any problems. Unfortu Continue reading >>

Difference Between Glucose And Fructose

Difference Between Glucose And Fructose

Home Science Biology Difference Between Glucose and Fructose Carbohydrate is an essential macromolecule to all living creatures in the world and it can be divided into three categories. They are monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides. Glucose and fructose are considered as simple and the most abundant monosaccharides in the world. However, there seems to be a lot of confusion over the difference between glucose and fructose because they have a similar formula: C6H12O6. Both fructose and glucose are considered as simple reducing sugars and are absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion. However, glucose is an aldo sugar whereas fructose is a simple keto sugar. Fructose is used commercially in foods and beverage industries because of its low cost and high sweetness compared to glucose. This is the main difference between glucose and fructose. In this article, lets elaborate the difference between glucose and fructose in terms of their intended uses as well as chemical and physical properties. The word glucose is derived from Greek and literally means sweet wine; it is also known as grape sugar. Its molecular formula is C6H12O6. The D-glucose is the most predominant isomer in nature compared to L-glucose. It is the major output of the photosynthesis process where water and carbon dioxide are used to produce glucose by plant chlorophylls pigments in the presence of sunlight. In addition, glucose is the main energy releasing compound in cellular respiration and it is more or less similar to the reverse of the photosynthesis reaction. Glucose is also used to synthesize some disaccharides and polysaccharides. It is used to synthesize starch in plant and glycogen in animals. In addition, it can be obtained by the hydrolysis of carbohydrates including Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between High Fructose Corn Syrup (hfcs) And Sugar?

What Is The Difference Between High Fructose Corn Syrup (hfcs) And Sugar?

What is the difference between high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and sugar? What is the difference between high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and sugar? HFCS and sugar are essentially equivalent as far as the body is concerned. Both high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and regular table sugar contain fructose and glucose. Sugar is a disaccharide, which consists of a glucose and fructose molecule linked together. This gives sugar a composition of 50% glucose and 50% fructose. While HFCS also consists of glucose and fructose, the composition can vary somewhat, but is generally in the range of 55% fructose and 42% glucose. Where HFCS and sugar differ is in how they are produced. While sugar is a naturally occurring disaccharide, HFCS is artificially produced from corn. HFCS production involves processing corn into corn starch, which is then turned into a syrup that is 100% glucose. The problem with glucose as a sweetener is that its not all that sweet. To increase the sweetness of corn syrup, enzymatic reactions are used to convert a portion of the glucose to fructose, resulting in a mixture of glucose and fructose molecules also known as HFCS. The major distinction then between HFCS and sugar isnt so much in their composition, but their bonding. Glucose and fructose are linked in sugar as a disaccharide, whereas HFCS consists of a mixture of free glucose and fructose molecules. Since sugar is broken down into glucose and fructose by enzymes in the small intestine, HFCS and sugar are essentially equivalent after being absorbed by the body. Continue reading >>

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