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What Is The Best Exercise To Lower Blood Sugar?

An Easy Walk Lowers Blood Sugar Level

An Easy Walk Lowers Blood Sugar Level

We’ve learned through experience and the advice of experts that a healthy life can require bypassing whole aisles of temptations in the grocery store while forcing ourselves to work out on a regular basis in a gym. But it doesn’t have to cost us so much sweat or demand superhuman supermarket discipline. Research reveals that an easy walk after a meal can do wonders for our blood sugar curve. And that’s not all. Very mild activity appears to work as well as a more intensive workout. “Just getting up and walking about is enough to prevent a rise in blood sugar considerably, in fact as much as medicines designed to curb high blood sugar levels,” says Professor Arne Torbjørn Høstmark. He has conducted a number of studies on this surprisingly little discussed phenomenon. The studies have been carried out at the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences and the University of Oslo and a number of researchers has been involved. “You’d expect this advice to be included in lots of textbooks, but unfortunately it isn’t,” he says. High blood sugar levels are common A certain increase in blood sugar after a meal is perfectly natural. Digestion turns the carbohydrates we eat into glucose sugar, which is carried to the cells in our body by the circulatory system. Glucose is the fuel that powers all our cells. The hormone insulin opens the cells in muscles and other tissue so that the sugar can be extracted from the blood and let in where it’s needed. But sometimes this mechanism doesn’t work as it should. For many people, especially those with diabetes 2, the cells don’t open effectively enough and blood sugar levels can rocket into the stratosphere after a meal. This can be rough on the body. Frequent instances of elevated blood sugar levels can increase the risk o Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Exercise – Does It Really Work ?

Type 2 Diabetes Exercise – Does It Really Work ?

Fix Your Lifestyle, Fix T2D Type 2 diabetes has always been recognized as a “lifestyle” disease. This means that although you may or may not have the genes that dispose you to becoming diabetic, whether you actually become diabetic and if you do, whether you’re able to reverse diabetes (yeah, you heard right. We said “Reverse it!”). type 2 diabetes exercise is strongly linked to lifestyle choices you make, especially diet and physical activities. When we say lifestyle, we include diet in it. So the key components, each supported by research studies that have shown measurable results on reduction of diabetes include: Eating right; low on carbs, moderate proteins, high on good fats Fasting right; giving you body the break it needs between meals Reducing stress levels; so your body is not craving sugars to combat stress Using your medicines and dietary supplements wisely to reduce insulin resistance. Losing weight, the healthy way Exercising correctly; picking and sticking to an exercise routine that suits you. This last point is exactly what the rest of this piece is about. At sepalika.com, we go the extra mile to make sure that the information that we share is reliable; that it has research studies to back it up. Please click on “References” at the end of the article to see the research studies that have contributed to the creation of this article. Benefits Of Exercise for Diabetics Exercise is known to have many benefits. Lowers blood pressure. Lowers unhealthy cholesterol. Improves circulation. Supports healthy weight. Makes your muscles and bones stronger. Increases energy levels. Improves posture, balance and independent living. Helps you sleep better. Aids stress management. Improves sense of overall well being. Makes it easier to control your blood gl Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Regular physical activity and exercise are recommended for the general population for overall improved health. However, exercise of moderate intensity increases the risk of hypoglycemia during and following exertion in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Accordingly, exercise guidelines for T1DM focus on prevention of exercise-induced hypoglycemia. The risk of hypoglycemia may discourage some with T1DM from exercising. Children and youth may be embarrassed by the temporary reduction in coordination and physical performance associated with hypoglycemia and by the fear of letting teammates down while playing. Some parents may discourage their children from normal participation in physical activity and from playing competitive sports because of concern about severe hypoglycemia. However, this fear may reduce a child’s physical activity, which may lead to reduced overall health, reduced enjoyment from exercise, and restricted confidence in meeting the demands imposed by living with a chronic health condition like diabetes. As a result, long-term exercise habits as well as personal growth and psycho-social development may be blunted. Concern with hypoglycemia from exercise is probably even more heightened in those with hypoglycemia unawareness, or the absence of symptoms during hypoglycemia. However, some of these concerns might be allayed by the realization that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugars rather than lower it. The fact that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugar appears to be relatively unknown to many with T1DM. However, the effect has been confirmed in a number of studies. These studies have identified an exercise threshold that elicits this response. The threshold exercise intensity occurs at or above 80% of a person’s maximum exercis Continue reading >>

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

If you get a high reading when checking your blood sugar, is there a way to get the number down quickly? Continue reading >>

3 Easy Tips To Lower Blood Sugar Fast

3 Easy Tips To Lower Blood Sugar Fast

Jeanette Terry was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 11 years old, and she has since lived with diabetes through difficult life transitions, including the teenage years, college, and having children. She addresses the day-to-day struggles of living with diabetes—going beyond medical advice—to improve overall adherence and management. Extremely high blood sugar levels can be dangerous, and they can cause lasting health complications. Remember: if you ever have blood sugar readings that remain high for more than 24 hours without coming down (and after an effort has been made to lower them), you need to be addressed by a doctor. That being said, we've all had those days when we get a random high blood sugar reading and we are not sure what caused it…or we forget to give insulin, or we eat a delicious dessert without realizing how much sugar is actually in it. For whatever reason, those out of the ordinary high blood sugar readings happen and need to be treated. No need to rush to the doctor for every high blood sugar reading though. There are some simple steps you can take to lower blood sugar fast. Watch for signs of high blood sugar You know the feeling: extreme thirst, sluggishness, nausea, blurred vision, a downright sick feeling. And your family or friends may tell you that extreme irritability is a major sign you need to check your blood sugar to see if it is high. The best thing to do is to catch it before it gets really high, or it will be harder to bring down quickly, causing havoc on your blood sugar readings for days. If you do not take insulin as a part of your treatment plan, these tips will show you how to lower your blood sugar fast. If you take insulin, you will first want to give the appropriate amount of insulin to correct the blood sugar. Continue reading >>

The Step-by-step Approach To Better Blood Sugars: Walking

The Step-by-step Approach To Better Blood Sugars: Walking

If you’re like me, you might have a health-focused New Year’s resolution posted on your wall: "lose weight," "exercise more, "be less stressed." Unfortunately, making resolutions is easy, but sticking to them is hard. A 15,000-person survey found that four out of five people who make New Year’s resolutions eventually break them. And it gets worse: a sizeable percentage of people (11%) in one survey actually broke their resolution one week in! As I pondered this depressing data, I thought about scientifically testing the simplest, most fundamental exercise possible: walking. It can be done anywhere, does not cost anything, and requires no equipment. And because the barriers to doing it are so low, it also helps address that very basic New Year’s Resolution conundrum outlined above. What follows is my personal diabetes experience testing the blood sugar benefits of walking, a brief review of studies on diabetes and walking, and five tips to incorporate walking into your daily routine. If you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! Walking with diabetes – my own experience As a fitness fiend my whole life, I tend to think of “exercise” with a very intense, all-or-nothing frame of reference: cycling, strength training, and playing basketball. So when I approached the question of how much walking could really drop my blood sugars, I was skeptical. In an effort to test it objectively, I performed a dozen periods of walking, and measured my blood glucose immediately before and immediately after finishing. I timed each walk with a stopwatch, always made sure I had less than one unit of insulin-on-board, and tried to go at a normal speed. On average, walking dropped my blood sugar by approximately one mg/dl per minute. The la Continue reading >>

15 Easy Ways To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

15 Easy Ways To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

High blood sugar occurs when your body can't effectively transport sugar from blood into cells. When left unchecked, this can lead to diabetes. One study from 2012 reported that 12–14% of US adults had type 2 diabetes, while 37–38% were classified as pre-diabetic (1). This means that 50% of all US adults have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Here are 15 easy ways to lower blood sugar levels naturally: Regular exercise can help you lose weight and increase insulin sensitivity. Increased insulin sensitivity means your cells are better able to use the available sugar in your bloodstream. Exercise also helps your muscles use blood sugar for energy and muscle contraction. If you have problems with blood sugar control, you should routinely check your levels. This will help you learn how you respond to different activities and keep your blood sugar levels from getting either too high or too low (2). Good forms of exercise include weight lifting, brisk walking, running, biking, dancing, hiking, swimming and more. Exercise increases insulin sensitivity and helps your muscles pick up sugars from the blood. This can lead to reduced blood sugar levels. Your body breaks carbs down into sugars (mostly glucose), and then insulin moves the sugars into cells. When you eat too many carbs or have problems with insulin function, this process fails and blood glucose levels rise. However, there are several things you can do about this. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends controlling carb intake by counting carbs or using a food exchange system (3). Some studies find that these methods can also help you plan your meals appropriately, which may further improve blood sugar control (4, 5). Many studies also show that a low-carb diet helps reduce blood sugar levels and prevent blood s Continue reading >>

Exercise With A Plan If You Have High Blood Pressure, Diabetes

Exercise With A Plan If You Have High Blood Pressure, Diabetes

"Exercise is medicine," says Fitness Center exercise physiologist Dan Wanta. And when it comes to two common disorders - high blood pressure and elevated blood sugars - Dr. Heather Johnson agrees. Johnson, a UW Health cardiologist comments, "Regular exercise is just as important as your medications. Exercise and, if needed, weight loss can decrease the amount of medications prescribed for your blood pressure and blood sugar." But Wanta and fellow Fitness Center exercise physiologist Jude Sullivan offer their "prescription" with a proviso: people diagnosed with hypertension (high blood pressure) or diabetes (the inability to produce and/or use insulin properly to control blood sugar levels) should talk with their doctor before starting a new exercise program to learn how to safely monitor blood pressure and blood sugar. Exercise and High Blood Pressure High blood pressure afflicts nearly 70 million people in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control, and greatly increases the risk of heart attacks and strokes. The behavioral causes are many, and a sedentary lifestyle is right up at the top of the list, along with a poor diet and smoking. But behaviors can be controlled, which means embracing physical activity can reverse the negative effects of a sedentary existence. "Exercise on most days of your life," Wanta says, a recommendation that applies no matter your blood pressure or blood sugar levels. "Get 150 minutes of moderate, or 75 minutes of vigorous, activity per week." Dr. Johnson adds, "If your goal is weight loss - gradually increase your exercise to 300 minutes of moderate-intesnity exercise per week." And it doesn't have to be completed all at once, she adds. "If necessary, divide your exercise into smaller amounts of time - 10-15 minutes pe Continue reading >>

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Get a move on Exercise is safe—and highly recommended—for most people with type 2 diabetes, including those with complications. Along with diet and medication, exercise will help you lower blood sugar and lose weight. However, the prospect of diving into a workout routine may be intimidating. If you're like many newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics, you may not have exercised in years. If that's the case, don't worry: It's fine to start slow and work up. These tips will help you ease back into exercise and find a workout plan that works for you. Try quick workouts As long as you're totaling 30 minutes of exercise each day, several brief workouts are fine, says George Griffing, MD, professor of endocrinology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "We need people with diabetes up and moving," Dr. Griffing says. "If you can do your exercise in one 30 minute stretch, fine. But if not, break it up into increments you can manage that add up to at least 30 minutes each day." Focus on overall activity Increase activity in general—such as walking or climbing stairs—rather than a particular type of exercise. However, don't rely on housework or other daily activity as your sole exercise. Too often, people overestimate the amount of exercise they get and underestimate the amount of calories they consume. (A step-counting pedometer can help.) Get a pedometer Stanford University researchers conducted a review of 26 studies looking at the use of pedometers as motivation for physical activity. Published in 2007, the review found that people who used a pedometer increased their activity by 27%. Having a goal of 10,000 steps a day (about five miles) was important, even if the goal wasn't reached. Pedometer users lost more weight, had a greater drop in blood pr Continue reading >>

How To Best Manage And Prevent Exercise Low Blood Sugars

How To Best Manage And Prevent Exercise Low Blood Sugars

If you take insulin or another blood glucose-lowering medication, you are at risk for low blood sugar (usually defined as blood glucose < 65 mg/dl), or hypoglycemia, which can occur during or following physical activity. Low blood sugar can cause trembling, sweating, dizziness, blurred vision, impaired thinking, and even seizures and loss of consciousness. Exercise presents its own special challenges for managing blood sugar. Since any activity increases your body’s use of blood sugar, hypoglycemia can develop more easily. The more you understand about what makes your blood sugars go down (or sometimes up) during exercise, the easier it becomes to control and the more confident you can be about doing activities and staying in control of your diabetes. Much of your blood sugar response has to do with how much insulin is in your bloodstream. If your insulin levels are high during a physical activity, your muscles will take up more blood glucose (since muscle contractions themselves stimulate glucose uptake without insulin) and you’re more likely to end up with low blood sugars. You can even end up with late-onset hypoglycemia, which can occur from right after to up to 48 hours after you exercise. What’s important is to do your best to prevent lows before, during and after exercise by taking the steps listed below. Prevent Lows Before, During and After Exercise Learn how your body responds to exercise by checking your blood sugar levels before, (occasionally) during, and after exercise. If your blood sugar is near or below 70 mg/dl before you exercise, bring it back within normal range before you begin by consuming some carbohydrates. Always be prepared to correct a low by carrying a rapid-acting carbohydrate with you during exercise. Don’t assume you’ll be able Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Exercise is an important part of any diabetes treatment plan. To avoid potential problems, check your blood sugar before, during and after exercise. Diabetes and exercise go hand in hand, at least when it comes to managing your diabetes. Exercise can help you improve your blood sugar control, boost your overall fitness, and reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. But diabetes and exercise pose unique challenges, too. To exercise safely, it's crucial to track your blood sugar before, during and after physical activity. You'll learn how your body responds to exercise, which can help you prevent potentially dangerous blood sugar fluctuations. Before exercise: Check your blood sugar before your workout Before jumping into a fitness program, get your doctor's OK to exercise — especially if you've been inactive. Talk to your doctor about any activities you're contemplating, the best time to exercise and the potential impact of medications on your blood sugar as you become more active. For the best health benefits, experts recommend at least 150 minutes a week of moderately intense physical activities such as: Fast walking Lap swimming Bicycling If you're taking insulin or medications that can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), test your blood sugar 30 minutes before exercising. Consider these general guidelines relative to your blood sugar level — measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Lower than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Your blood sugar may be too low to exercise safely. Eat a small snack containing 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates, such as fruit juice, fruit, crackers or even glucose tablets before you begin your workout. 100 to 250 mg/dL (5.6 to 13.9 mmol/L). You're good to go. For most people, this is a safe pre-exercise Continue reading >>

8 Best Workouts For Diabetes

8 Best Workouts For Diabetes

No doubt you’ve heard about the wonders of exercise (how it helps you lose weight, sleep better, and feel more energetic), but for people who have diabetes, exercise is absolutely essential. "Trying to manage diabetes without being physically active is like a singer performing without a microphone," says Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, author of Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical… Continue reading >>

Exercises To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Exercises To Lower Your Blood Sugar

It’s never too late to reap the benefits of exercise, whether you’re 45 or 95. First of all, it simply makes you feel good to move. By becoming more active, you can also lower your blood sugar to keep diabetes under control. “You don’t need to run a marathon to get results,” says Dawn Sherr, RD, of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. “Walking, swimming, and playing with the grandkids are all great ways to get exercise.” Follow these four steps to get started. If you're just starting, ask your doctor which exercise is right for you. Ask if you need to adjust your diabetes medicine before you hit the trail or the pool. Next, think about what you'll enjoy most. You’re more likely to stick with activities you like. Here are a few suggestions: Walk outdoors or indoors on a track or in a mall Take a dance class Bicycle outdoors or ride a stationary bike indoors Swim or try water aerobics Stretch Try yoga or tai chi Play tennis Take aerobics or another fitness class Do housework, yard chores, or gardening Try resistance training with light weights or elastic bands If more than one of these appeals to you, go for them! In fact, combining cardio, like walking or swimming, with stretching or balance moves gives you a better workout. Any way you move will help lower your blood sugar. When you do moderate exercise, like walking, that makes your heart beat a little faster and breathe a little harder. Your muscles use more glucose, the sugar in your blood stream. Over time, this can lower your blood sugar levels. It also makes the insulin in your body work better. You'll get these benefits for hours after your walk or workout. Just remember you don’t have to overdo it. Strenuous exercise can sometimes increase blood sugar temporarily after you stop exerc Continue reading >>

5 Strength-training Moves To Help Improve Insulin Sensitivity

5 Strength-training Moves To Help Improve Insulin Sensitivity

Grab a set of handweights and get motivated, get moving, get muscles! BY NICOLE GLOR Research from the University of Michigan’s Life Sciences Institute shows that white muscle—the kind you get from lifting weights and resistance training, and that also develops with age—might be a big help when it comes to keeping blood sugar levels regulated. Build muscle for better blood sugar? As we age, red muscle (the kind you find in young people and endurance athletes) gets overtaken by white muscle. Until recently, it was thought that this change could make you more susceptible to diabetes because white muscle would increase the body’s dependency on glucose as fuel. As a result, the cells would be overwhelmed by insulin and unable to respond to this sugar-metabolizing hormone. But when researchers examined the effect on mice, the results which were published in the journal Nature Medicine, revealed that white muscle appeared to create a pathway for keeping blood sugar regulated in mice. Human trials are underway to see if the same effect occurs in people. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Exercise

Diabetes And Exercise

Tweet People with diabetes are encouraged to exercise regularly for better blood sugar control and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The reason for this is that muscles which are working use more glucose than those that are resting. Muscle movement leads to greater sugar uptake by muscle cells and lower blood sugar levels. Additional benefits of exercise include a healthier heart, better weight control and stress management. Exercise is the common term used to describe any bodily activity that enhances or maintains physical fitness and overall health and wellness. Why is exercise important? As well as strengthening the cardiovascular system and the body’s muscles, many people exercise to keep fit, lose or maintain a healthy weight, sharpen their athletic skills, or purely for enjoyment. Frequent and regular physical exercise is recommended for people of all ages as it boosts the immune system and helps protect against conditions such as: Heart disease Stroke Cancer and other major illnesses In fact, it is known to cut your risk of major chronic illnesses/diseases by up to 50% and reduce your risk of early death by up to 30%. Other health benefits of exercising on a regular basis include: Improves mental health Boosts self esteem/confidence Enhances sleep quality and energy levels Cuts risk of stress and depression Protects against dementia and Alzheimer’s disease Furthermore, exercise is free, can be carried out anywhere at anytime and has an immediate effect on your health. What counts as exercise? In the UK, regular exercise is defined by the NHS as completing 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity a week. Aerobic activity at moderate intensity basically means exercising at a level that raises your heart rate and makes you sweat. This incl Continue reading >>

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