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What Is Glucose Used For In Food?

Using Dextrose (glucose) In Cooking And Baking

Using Dextrose (glucose) In Cooking And Baking

What is dextrose? Is it the same as glucose? What is it used for in baking? How is it different from regular sugar? How do I substitute dextrose for sugar in a recipe? Is glucose syrup the same as corn syrup? Where do I buy glucose / dextrose? This is your ultimate post on glucose / dextrose, read on to find out the answers to your questions What is dextrose (glucose)? Dextrose is a form of glucose. Dextrose = D-glucose, hence, the terms dextrose and glucose are used interchangeably. It’s also sometimes called corn sugar, grape sugar, crystaline glucose, wheat sugar, rice sugar or rice syrup. The full name is dextrose monohydrate and it is a simple sugar generated from the hydrolysis of starch, most commonly corn. The corn starch is treated with naturally occurring enzymes (they same as in our mouths) or acid. There is no way around the fact that this is a processed product, but at least it simulates natural occurrences (when we eat starch, it’s hydrolyzed by enzymes and broken down further by stomach acids to for example dextrose). Wait, hang on – I thought this was a sugar-free blog? I’m glad you asked. There are so many people, blogs, sites and books out there now with a “sugar-free” label. Despite that label, you may often find the following sugars in the recipes: Agave nectar, honey, brown rice syrup, glucose syrup, dextrose powder. Read about agave nectar here (to be honest, I fail to see this product as being healthy for anyone) and read about honey here (depends if you are overweight, diabetic or neither, but generally avoid it). When it comes to brown rice syrup (also known as rice malt syrup or rice syrup), glucose syrup (also know as liquid glucose) and dextrose powder, these are all broken down to 100% glucose in our bodies. Glucose can processed Continue reading >>

High Fructose Corn Syrup Questions And Answers

High Fructose Corn Syrup Questions And Answers

High Fructose Corn Syrup Questions and Answers Consumer Info About Additives & Ingredients Main Page FDA receives many inquiries and comments from the public about the chemistry of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in relation to other sweeteners such as table sugar and honey, and whether HFCS is safe to eat. HFCS is derived from corn starch. Starch itself is a chain of glucose (a simple sugar) molecules joined together. When corn starch is broken down into individual glucose molecules, the end product is corn syrup, which is essentially 100% glucose. To make HFCS, enzymes are added to corn syrup in order to convert some of the glucose to another simple sugar called fructose, also called fruit sugar because it occurs naturally in fruits and berries. HFCS is high in fructose compared to the pure glucose that is in corn syrup. Different formulations of HFCS contain different amounts of fructose. The most common forms of HFCS contain either 42 percent or 55 percent fructose, as described in the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 184.1866), and these are referred to in the industry as HFCS 42 and HFCS 55. The rest of the HFCS is glucose and water. HFCS 42 is mainly used in processed foods, cereals, baked goods, and some beverages. HFCS 55 is used primarily in soft drinks. Sucrose (sugar), the most well-known sweetener, is made by crystallizing sugar cane or beet juice. Sucrose is also made up of the same two simple sugars, glucose and fructose, joined together to form a single molecule containing one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule, an exact one-to-one ratio. The proportion of fructose to glucose in both HFCS 42 and HFCS 55 is similar to that of sucrose. The primary differences between sucrose and the common forms of HFCS are: In sucrose, a chemical bond joins th Continue reading >>

A Monosaccharide Glucose: Foods, Absorption, Function, Health Effects

A Monosaccharide Glucose: Foods, Absorption, Function, Health Effects

Glucose is asource of energy.Glucose from foods can provide3.8 Calories per gram [2,3];glucose powder and glucose for intravenous infusion, available asdextrose monohydrate, can provide 3.4 Calories per gram[4]. Glucose is aprecursor for fructose , galactose ,riboseand deoxyribose (in RNA and DNA in chromosomes), lipids , proteins , glucuronic acid, glucosamine andgalactosamine(in the cartilage) and other substances required for proper body functioning [5,7]. Glucose deficiency syndromehas not been observed so far, soglucose, like other carbohydrates, is not considered an essential nutrient [21]. You do not need to consume any glucose or other glucose-containing carbohydrates, such as starch or sucrose, to survive and maintain normal blood glucose levels, as long as you consume enough other nutrients from which glucose can be produced in your body: proteins [22], fats [5], fructose or galactose [23,24]or sugar alcohols ,such as sorbitol or xylitol [25] . The production of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources (dietary or body fat and protein) is called gluconeogenesis[5]. During a usual, high-carbohydrate diet, your brain can use only glucose as a fuel [26]. The brain burns about 20% of total calories you get (2,000-2,500 Cal/day in a sedentary persons diet), so about 400-500 Calories per day, which you can get from 100-130 grams of glucose[5,27,28]. Low-carbohydrate diet.If you start to consume less than 100 g of glucose per day, the first day your body will produce glucose from glycogen stores in your liver and muscles and later from the protein and fat you eat.If you stop to eat, (fasting, starvation), some fats from your body stores will be converted to glucose and ketones and both will be used as a fuel for your body, including the brain. Some of the ketones will Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Glucose & Sugar In Food

The Difference Between Glucose & Sugar In Food

Glucose is a type of sugar found in a range of foods, including fresh fruits and honey. Glucose is sometimes also called "blood sugar" as it is created when your body breaks down carbohydrates -- both sugars and starches. In turn, sugars in food include all varieties of sugars, such as fructose and lactose, not just glucose. Video of the Day Glucose is produced by your body as it breaks down carbohydrates, both simple -- such as table sugar -- and complex -- such as whole grains. It is used as a primary source of fuel for your body and is either used as energy immediately or stored in your liver and muscles for the future. Glucose is a simple sugar found in some foods, including corn syrup, honey, blueberries, raisins and peaches. However, it is also commonly found in the human body as the result of the digestion of carbs. Because glucose is absorbed directly by your body, it rapidly increases your blood sugar levels, giving it a high glycemic index, 100, when compared to other foods. The glycemic index measures how quickly a food affects your blood sugar levels. Sugars found in foods are divided into either natural sugars or added sugars, both of which are considered a simple carbohydrate. All sugars will break down into glucose. Natural sugars, such as fructose and lactose give some foods, such as fruits, their sweet taste. Added sugars are put into processed foods and drinks to augment the taste of food. They are commonly found in baked goods, candy and soft drinks. Some natural and added sugars, such as sucrose, maltose and lactose, naturally contain glucose as they are disaccharides. Disaccharides are two simple -- single -- sugar units attached together chemically. Healthy Carbohydrate Choices Carbohydrates are sometimes divided into good and bad carbs. Bad carboh Continue reading >>

Fructose - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Fructose - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Fructose is a 6-carbon ketose found in fruit and honey as a monosaccharide, and in sucrose (a disaccharide of fructose and glucose). J.M. Johnson, F.D. Conforti, in Encyclopedia of Food Sciences and Nutrition (Second Edition) , 2003 Fructose is a monosaccharide. Fructose bonded with glucose, another monosaccharide, forms sucrose, or table sugar. Fructose also occurs naturally in abundance in fruits (Table 1) and in lesser amounts in tuberous vegetables such as onions and potatoes. These sources alone contribute some 4060% of an individual's total fructose intake. However, the major source of fructose as an ingredient in food is from the hydrolyzation of starch to glucose, which is then converted to fructose. (See CARBOHYDRATES | Classification and Properties.) Fruits are a rich source of mono- and disaccharides. Dates contain up to 48.5% sucrose, and dried figs contain a mixture of 30.9% fructose and 42.0% glucose. The sucrose content of most fruit and fruit juices is low, though some varieties of melons, peaches, pineapple, and tangerine contain 69% sucrose, and mango contains 11.6% sucrose. Reducing sugars (primarily a mixture of fructose and glucose) are the main soluble carbohydrate of most fruits and account for 70% of seedless raisins. Vegetables contain substantially less fructose and glucose than fruits, and the only significant source of sucrose is sugar beets. In the late 19th century corn or potato starch was hydrolyzed with dilute acid to yield glucose and dextrins for commercial purposes. In the 1940s, cornstarch was the primary choice for the production of glucose and the introduction of enzyme technology for hydrolysis reactions contributed to the development of glucose syrups to fructose syrups of specified glucose content. The conversion of glucose syr Continue reading >>

Glucose Syrups: Technology And Applications

Glucose Syrups: Technology And Applications

General & Introductory Food Science & Technology Glucose Syrups: Technology and Applications Glucose Syrups: Technology and Applications Glucose syrups (commonly known as corn syrups in North America) are derived from starch sources such as maize, wheat and potatoes. Offering alternative functional properties to sugar as well as economic benefits, glucose syrups are extremely versatile sweeteners, and are widely used in food manufacturing and other industries. They are a key ingredient in confectionery products, beer, soft drinks, sports drinks, jams, sauces and ice creams, as well as in pharmaceuticals and industrial fermentations. This book brings together all the relevant information on the manufacture and use of glucose syrups. Drawing on forty years experience in the international glucose industry, the author provides a valuable reference for all those involved in the processing and buying of these syrups, and for scientists involved in the manufacture of a full range of food (and some non-food) products in which the syrups are ingredients. The emphasis is on practical information - recipes are included where relevant in the applications chapters, and appendices offer commonly-used calculations and useful data. Food technologists can use the book to make choices about the most suitable glucose syrup to use in a particular application, and also to adapt recipes in order to replace sugar (sucrose) or other ingredients. A glossary of terms reflecting the international terminology of the industry completes the book. This item:Glucose Syrups: Technology and Applications Continue reading >>

Food Sources Of Glucose

Food Sources Of Glucose

Melodie Anne Coffman specializes in overall wellness, with particular interests in women's health and personal defense. She holds a master's degree in food science and human nutrition and is a certified instructor through the NRA. Coffman is pursuing her personal trainer certification in 2015. Dried fruits are very high in glucose.Photo Credit: udra/iStock/Getty Images Glucose is one of the simplest types of sugar and the main source of energy your body uses. With the help of the hormone insulin, cells are able to pull in glucose from your bloodstream to use as fuel. Nearly all carbohydrate-containing foods, from fruits to breads, have some level of glucose, although fruits are usually the highest sources. Since glucose can elevate your blood sugar quickly, if you are diabetic, you may want to avoid regularly consuming foods high in glucose. Dried fruits are some of the richest glucose sources.Photo Credit: Geoarts/iStock/Getty Images Dried fruits are some of the richest glucose sources you can eat. One packed cup of raisins gives you more than 45 grams. Prunes and dried apricots each have nearly the same amount of glucose in 1 cup. Dried figs are slightly lower, providing about 37 grams of glucose in a 1-cup portion. All fresh fruits usually have some level of glucose.Photo Credit: mathieu boivin/iStock/Getty Images Typically all types of fruits have some level of glucose. A cup of kiwi slices has almost 10 grams; the same amount of plums provides closer to 9 grams. A cup of diced papaya has 6 grams and a large 5-ounce pear contains under 5 grams. One cup of diced honeydew, a raw tangerine and a 4-ounce apple each contain 3.5 to 4.5 grams of glucose. For about 3 grams of glucose, you can have a 5 1/2-ounce peach or 1 cup of freshly sliced strawberries. Honey and sweet Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Use Up Your Jar Of Queen Glucose Syrup

10 Ways To Use Up Your Jar Of Queen Glucose Syrup

10 ways to use up your jar of Queen Glucose Syrup If you have a humble jar of Queen Glucose stashed away at the back of the pantry, this blog is for you! Read on to discover new recipes to make using glucose and why its such a handy baking ingredient. Glucose syrup is typically used in foods to enhance flavour, soften, add volume and prevent crystallisation. There is a tonne of incredible ways to use up that jar of goodness, so weve rounded up 10 amazing ideas to use up that jar of Queen Glucose Syrup , that hopefully become new favourites in your baking repertoire. Home > Blog > Inspiration Alert > 10 ways to use up your jar of Queen Glucose Syrup Marshmallows, what can we say? Pillowy soft, fluffy and irresistible. You may end up using your jar making batch after batch of these Vanilla and Maple Marshmallows. If youve never made your own marshmallows, youre in for a treat. Glucose is the ultimate texture enhancer, not only does it stop crystallisation, it creates a creamier marshmallow and helps keep them soft and squishy for days. If they last that long Glucose is the perfect substitute for corn syrup. Traditionally, Pecan Pie is made with half corn syrup, half sugar to create a smooth textured pie without being overly sweet. This means that delicious pecan flavour shines through without too much caramelisation. Glucose is one of the best binders for Chewy Granola Bars. Its perfect for holding all your ingredients together without the sweetness that honey, sugar or other syrups give. Because Glucose is only 74% sweetness of sugar its perfect for those who prefer their granola bars on the lower end of the sweetness scale. To put it simply, the molecules in glucose stop the other sugars from crystallising, which creates that gritty, icy texture you sometimes find in y Continue reading >>

Storage And Use Of Glucose

Storage And Use Of Glucose

The glucose produced in photosynthesis may be used in various ways by plants and algae. Storage Glucose is needed by cells for respiration. However, it is not produced at night when it is too dark for photosynthesis to happen. Plants and algae store glucose as insoluble products. These include: Use Some glucose is used for respiration to release energy. Some is used to produce: Plants also need nitrates to make proteins. These are absorbed from the soil as nitrate ions. Three factors can limit the speed of photosynthesis: light intensity, carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. Without enough light, a plant cannot photosynthesise very quickly, even if there is plenty of water and carbon dioxide. Increasing the light intensity will boost the speed of photosynthesis. Sometimes photosynthesis is limited by the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air. Even if there is plenty of light, a plant cannot photosynthesise if there is insufficient carbon dioxide. If it gets too cold, the rate of photosynthesis will decrease. Plants cannot photosynthesise if it gets too hot. If you plot the rate of photosynthesis against the levels of these three limiting factors, you get graphs like the ones above. In practice, any one of these factors could limit the rate of photosynthesis. Farmers can use their knowledge of factors limiting the rate of photosynthesis to increase crop yields. This is particularly true in greenhouses, where the conditions are more easily controlled than in the open air outside: The use of artificial light allows photosynthesis to continue beyond daylight hours. Bright lights also provide a higher-than-normal light intensity. The use of artificial heating allows photosynthesis to continue at an increased rate. The use of additional carbon dioxide released i Continue reading >>

Bbc - Gcse Bitesize: Photosynthesis

Bbc - Gcse Bitesize: Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis captures energy for life on Earth. Many chemicals are made to allow life processes to occur in plants. These chemicals can move in and out of cells by the process of diffusion. Osmosis is a specific type of diffusion. Photosynthesis is a process used by plants in which energy from sunlight is used to convert carbon dioxide and water into molecules needed for growth. These molecules include sugars, enzymes and chlorophyll. Light energy is absorbed by the green chemical chlorophyll. This energy allows the production of glucose by the reaction between carbon dioxide and water. Oxygen is also produced as a waste product. This reaction can be summarised in the word equation: The chemical equation for photosynthesis is: Glucose is made up of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms. Glucose made by the process of photosynthesis may be used in three ways: It can be converted into chemicals required for growth of plant cells such as cellulose It can be converted into starch, a storage molecule, that can be converted back to glucose when the plant requires it It can be broken down during the process of respiration, releasing energy stored in the glucose molecules Plants cells contain a number of structures that are involved in the process of photosynthesis: Diagram of a plant cell involved in production of glucose from photosynthesis Chloroplasts - containing chlorophyll and enzymes needed for reactions in photosynthesis. Nucleus - containing DNA carrying the genetic code for enzymes and other proteins used in photosynthesis Cell membrane - allowing gas and water to pass in and out of the cell while controlling the passage of other molecules Vacuole - containing cell sap to keep the cell turgid Cytoplasm - enzymes and other proteins used in photosynthesis made here Continue reading >>

Background On Carbohydrates & Sugars

Background On Carbohydrates & Sugars

Carbohydrates and Sugars Carbohydrates are one of three basic macronutrients needed to sustain life (the other two are proteins and fats). They are found in a wide range of foods that bring a variety of other important nutrients to the diet, such as vitamins and minerals, phytochemicals, antioxidants, and dietary fiber. Fruits, vegetables, grain foods, and many dairy products naturally contain carbohydrates in varying amounts, including sugars, which are a type of carbohydrate that can add taste appeal to a nutritious diet. Carbohydrate Classification Carbohydrates encompass a broad range of sugars, starches, and fiber. The basic building block of a carbohydrate is a simple union of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The chemical definition of a carbohydrate is any compound containing these three elements and having twice as many hydrogen atoms as oxygen and carbon. Sugars in Foods When people hear the word “sugar” they often think of the familiar sweetener in the sugar bowl. That sugar is sucrose and is the most familiar form of sugar to home bakers. But there are many types of sugars, which scientists classify according to their chemical structure. Sugars occur naturally in a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and dairy foods. They can also be produced commercially and added to foods to heighten sweetness and for the many technical functions they perform, including: contributing to foods’ structure and texture, sweetening and flavor enhancement, controlling crystallization, providing a medium for the growth of yeast in baked goods, and preventing spoilage. The sweetening ability of sugar can promote the consumption of nutrient-rich foods that might not be otherwise be consumed. Some examples are a sprinkle of sugar added to oatmeal or adding sugar to cranberries in Continue reading >>

What Is Glucose-fructose Syrup? (q&a)

What Is Glucose-fructose Syrup? (q&a)

Carbohydrates | Sugars | 05 April 2018 Glucose is a simple sugar, a so-called monosaccharide, because it is made up of just one sugar unit. It is found naturally in many foods, and it is used by our bodies as a source of energy to carry out daily activities. Fructose is also a simple sugar, often referred to as a fruit sugar. Fructose, as the name suggest, is found in fruits (such as oranges and apples), berries, some root vegetables(such as beets, sweet potatoes, parsnips, and onions) and honey. Fructose is the sweetest of all naturally occurring sugars. Glucose and fructose bound together in equal amounts create another type of sugar sucrose a disaccharide commonly known as table sugar. GFS is a sweet liquid made of glucose and fructose. Unlike sucrose, where 50% of glucose and 50% of fructose are linked together, GFS can have a varying ratio of the two simple sugars, meaning that some extra, unbound glucose or fructose molecules are present. The fructose content in GFS can range from 5% to over 50%. GFS is typically made from starch. The source of starch depends on the local availability of the raw product used for extraction. Historically, maize was a preferred choice, while in recent years wheat became a popular source for the GFS production. Starch is a chain of glucose molecules, and the first step in GFS production involves freeing those glucose units. The linked glucose molecules in starch are cut down (hydrolysed) into free glucose molecules. Then, with the use of enzymes, some of the glucose is changed into fructose in a process called isomerisation. Check our infographic on how GFS is produced The main reasons for using GFS in foods and drinks are its sweetness and the ability to blend nicely with other ingredients. Interestingly, it can be also used in pla Continue reading >>

What Is Glucose?

What Is Glucose?

Glucose comes from the Greek word for "sweet." It's a type of sugar you get from foods you eat, and your body uses it for energy. As it travels through your bloodstream to your cells, it's called blood glucose or blood sugar. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose from your blood into the cells for energy and storage. People with diabetes have higher-than-normal levels in their blood. Either they don't have enough insulin to move it through or their cells don't respond to insulin as well as they should. High blood glucose for a long period of time can damage your kidneys, eyes, and other organs. How Your Body Makes Glucose It mainly comes from foods rich in carbohydrates, like bread, potatoes, and fruit. As you eat, food travels down your esophagus to your stomach. There, acids and enzymes break it down into tiny pieces. During that process, glucose is released. It goes into your intestines where it's absorbed. From there, it passes into your bloodstream. Once in the blood, insulin helps glucose get to your cells. Energy and Storage Your body is designed to keep the level of glucose in your blood constant. Beta cells in your pancreas monitor your blood sugar level every few seconds. When your blood glucose rises after you eat, the beta cells release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin acts like a key, unlocking muscle, fat, and liver cells so glucose can get inside them. Most of the cells in your body use glucose along with amino acids (the building blocks of protein) and fats for energy. But it's the main source of fuel for your brain. Nerve cells and chemical messengers there need it to help them process information. Without it, your brain wouldn't be able to work well. After your body has used the energy it needs, the leftover glucose is stored in little bundles Continue reading >>

Sugars: The Difference Between Fructose, Glucose And Sucrose

Sugars: The Difference Between Fructose, Glucose And Sucrose

29/06/2016 7:43 AM AEST | Updated 15/07/2016 12:56 PM AEST Sugars: The Difference Between Fructose, Glucose And Sucrose We're not just confused, we're also misinformed. "Fructose is the worst for you." "No way, sucrose is the devil." "I don't eat any sugar." Sugar is confusing. While some people only use certain types of sugars, others dismiss them completely. But is this necessary, or even grounded? To help settle the confusion, we spoke to Alan Barclay -- accredited practising dietitian, spokesperson for the Dietitians Association of Australia and Chief Scientific Officer at the Glycemic Index Foundation . "All the sugars are used as a source of fuel, but there are subtle differences in the way they are digested and absorbed," Barclay said. "In foods in Australia, the most common sugars are monosaccharides (glucose, fructose and galactose), but mostly these are occurring as disaccharides (which are sucrose, lactose and maltose)." Monosaccharides and disaccharides are two kinds of simple sugars, which are a form of carbohydrate. Oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, on the other hand, contain more sugar combinations and are known as complex carbohydrates -- for example, whole grain breads, brown rice and sweet potatoes. Monosaccharides require the least effort by the body to break down, meaning they are available for energy more quickly than disaccharides. "Monosaccharides don't require any digestion and can be absorbed into the mouth," Barclay said. "The problem there is they can cause dental caries which is one of the primary reasons why we need to be careful of how much added sugar we're consuming." Glucose -- the body's main source of energy and is found in fruit such as pasta, whole grain bread, legumes and a range of vegetables. Fructose -- this 'fruit sugar' fo Continue reading >>

Sugar Explained

Sugar Explained

You've probably heard the terms fructose, glucose, lactose and sucrose before, and you may know that they're all types of sugar. But do you know how they differ from one another, or whether some are better for you than others? Use our handy guide to shed some light on the secrets of sugar... What are complex and simple carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are classified into two basic groups, complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates are composed of multiple simple sugars, joined together by chemical bonds. The more chains and branches of simple sugars, the more complex a carbohydrate is and in turn, the longer it takes to be broken down by the body and the less impact it has on blood sugar levels. Examples of complex carbohydrates include wholegrains such as jumbo oats, brown rice, spelt, rye and barley. Simple carbohydrates are either monosaccharides (one sugar molecule) or disaccharides (two sugar molecules). They are digested quickly and release sugars rapidly into the bloodstream. The two main monosaccharides are glucose and fructose. The two major disaccharides are sucrose (composed of glucose and fructose) and lactose (which is made up of galactose and glucose). Glucose What is glucose? Glucose is the primary source of energy your body uses and every cell relies on it to function. When we talk about blood sugar we are referring to glucose in the blood. When we eat carbohydrates, our body breaks them down into units of glucose. When blood glucose levels rise, cells in the pancreas release insulin, signalling cells to take up glucose from the blood. As the cells absorb sugar from the blood, levels start to drop. The nutritional profile of glucose The glycemic index is a ranking of how quickly foods make your blood sugar levels rise after eating them. High GI foods are very Continue reading >>

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