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What Is Glucose Fructose Syrup Made From?

What Is The Difference Between Glucose-fructose And Fructose-glucose Syrups?

What Is The Difference Between Glucose-fructose And Fructose-glucose Syrups?

What is the difference between glucose-fructose and fructose-glucose syrups? What is the difference between glucose-fructose and fructose-glucose syrups? Just like table sugar (sucrose), glucose fructose and fructose-glucose syrups are also made up of glucose and fructose. While table sugar has a fixed proportion of 50% glucose and 50% fructose, the percentage of these molecules in syrups may vary. If a syrup contains more than 50% of fructose, it is called fructose-glucose syrup on the packaging. If there is less than 50% fructose in it, it is called glucose-fructose syrup. The typical fructose content of such syrups produced in Europe is 20, 30, and 42%. In the US, the most frequently used fructose content is 55% and these syrups are referred to as High Fructose Corn Syrups (HFCS). The syrups with the fructose content between 42% and 55% have a similar sweetness to table sugar, so this is why they are often used as alternatives to table sugar. The advantage of these syrups is that they come in a liquid form, unlike table sugar which is crystallised. Thus, they are easier to blend with other ingredients in creams, ice creams and drinks. Continue reading >>

Updated Factsheet On Glucose Fructose Syrups, Isoglucose And High Fructose Corn Syrup 2016

Updated Factsheet On Glucose Fructose Syrups, Isoglucose And High Fructose Corn Syrup 2016

Home / All our issues , Homepage-news , News , Nutrition and Health /UPDATED FACTSHEET ON GLUCOSE FRUCTOSE SYRUPS, ISOGLUCOSE AND HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP 2016 UPDATED FACTSHEET ON GLUCOSE FRUCTOSE SYRUPS, ISOGLUCOSE AND HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP 2016 admin 2018-01-08T20:04:41+00:00 September 13th, 2016| Terms like glucose fructose syrups, isoglucose and High Fructose Corn Syrups (HFCS) are often confused and used interchangeably. This section aims to clarify the differences. (read more) Glucose is a simple sugar found naturally in many foods. Glucose performs a unique and vital role as an energy source for the brain which cannot use other types of energy [i] . Fructose is also a simple sugar found in many foods. It is the sweetest of all naturally occurring sugars. High levels of fructose are, for example, typically found in fruits notably tree fruits (oranges, apples etc.), berries, melons and some root vegetables such as sweet potatoes, parsnips and onions Sucrose, or table sugar, is made up of glucose and fructose linked together in a 1:1 ratio (i.e., 50% glucose, 50% fructose). Glucose Fructose Syrup (GFS) is a liquid sweetener used in the manufacturing of foods and beverages. It is composed of different sugars, mainly glucose and fructose, with varying compositions, with a fructose content ranging from 5 to 50%. If the fructose content exceeds 50%, the product becomes a Fructose-Glucose Syrup. Isoglucose is glucose fructose syrups with more than 10% of fructose, as defined in EU legislation [1] . In the United States, this type of product is produced from maize starch most commonly either with a 42% or a 55% fructose content and is called High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS). [1] For a definition of isoglucose please see COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 1234/2007 of 22 Octob Continue reading >>

6 Reasons Why High-fructose Corn Syrup Is Bad For You

6 Reasons Why High-fructose Corn Syrup Is Bad For You

6 Reasons Why High-Fructose Corn Syrup Is Bad for You Written by Rudy Mawer, MSc, CISSN on October 5, 2016 High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a type of artificial sugar made from corn syrup. Many experts state that sugar and HFCS are key factors in today's obesity epidemic ( 1 , 2 ). HFCS and sugar are also linked to many other serious health issues, including diabetes and heart disease ( 3 , 4 ). Here are 6 reasons why high-fructose corn syrup is bad for your health. 1. High-Fructose Corn Syrup Adds an Unnatural Amount of Fructose to Your Diet The fructose in HFCS can cause health issues if eaten in excessive amounts. Most starchy carbs, such as rice, are broken down into glucose, the basic form of carbs. However, table sugar and HFCS are 50% glucose and 50% fructose ( 5 ). Glucose is easily transported and utilized by every cell in your body. It's also the predominant fuel source for high-intensity exercise and various processes. In contrast, the fructose from high fructose corn syrup or table sugar needs to be converted to fat or glycogen (stored carbs) by the liver before it can be used as fuel. HFCS adds unnatural amounts of fructose to your diet, which the human body has not evolved to handle properly. In fact, up until the last few decades, your diet would have contained only a very small amount of fructose from natural sources such as fruits and vegetables ( 6 ). In addition to lower concentrations of fructose, fruits contain fiber, water , micronutrients and antioxidants. None of the info in this article applies to whole fruit, which is very healthy ( 6 ). The adverse effects listed below are mostly caused by excess fructose, and these apply to both high-fructose corn syrup (55% fructose) and plain sugar (50% fructose). Bottom Line: HFCS and sugar contain both Continue reading >>

Straight Talk About High-fructose Corn Syrup: What It Is And What It Ain't

Straight Talk About High-fructose Corn Syrup: What It Is And What It Ain't

Straight talk about high-fructose corn syrup: what it is and what it ain't From White Technical Research, Argenta, IL Address reprint requests to JS White, White Technical Research, 8895 Hickory Hills Drive, Argenta, IL 62501. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 88, Issue 6, 1 December 2008, Pages 1716S1721S, John S White; Straight talk about high-fructose corn syrup: what it is and what it ain't, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 88, Issue 6, 1 December 2008, Pages 1716S1721S, High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a fructose-glucose liquid sweetener alternative to sucrose (common table sugar) first introduced to the food and beverage industry in the 1970s. It is not meaningfully different in composition or metabolism from other fructose-glucose sweeteners like sucrose, honey, and fruit juice concentrates. HFCS was widely embraced by food formulators, and its use grew between the mid-1970s and mid-1990s, principally as a replacement for sucrose. This was primarily because of its sweetness comparable with that of sucrose, improved stability and functionality, and ease of use. Although HFCS use today is nearly equivalent to sucrose use in the United States, we live in a decidedly sucrose-sweetened world: >90% of the nutritive sweetener used worldwide is sucrose. Here I review the history, composition, availability, and characteristics of HFCS in a factual manner to clarify common misunderstandings that have been a source of confusion to health professionals and the general public alike. In particular, I evaluate the strength of the popular hypothesis that HFCS is uniquely responsible for obesity. Although examples of pure fructose causing metabolic upset at high conc Continue reading >>

What's So Bad About High Fructose Corn Syrup?

What's So Bad About High Fructose Corn Syrup?

“It’s natural, nutritionally the same as table sugar and has the same number of calories,” say ads for high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Others call the sweetener “a growing health hazard,” “naturally evil,” and worse. For now, the naysayers seem to be winning: the number of foods flaunting “No HFCS” labels is rising steadily. Even Snapple and Pepsi recently launched new beverages sans HFCS. But what’s the truth about HFCS? Is HFCS the main culprit in the obesity epidemic? The theory sounded logical in 2004, when an article in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition proposed it. The study’s authors—including Barry Popkin, Ph.D., director of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill’s Interdisciplinary Obesity Center—pointed out that from 1970 to 1990 Americans’ intake of HFCS increased by more than 1,000 percent. The researchers also noted that, during that same time, the proportion of Americans who were overweight or obese increased from about half to two-thirds. Singling out HFCS turned out to be unjustified, Popkin now admits. “Dozens of human studies on HFCS and energy intake and weight change show that our hypothesis was wrong.” The American Medical Association came to a similar conclusion last June, when it announced: “High-fructose corn syrup does not appear to contribute more to obesity than other caloric sweeteners.” So why are so many more Americans overweight? For one, we’re eating more, period: the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates show that, since 1970, our daily calorie intake has grown by a whopping 24 percent. Sweetened beverages have added a huge quantity of calories to our diets. “More than 450 of a person’s daily calories come from beverages, 40 percent from soft drinks or fruit juices, Continue reading >>

A Sweetener With A Bad Rap

A Sweetener With A Bad Rap

EVERY time Marie Cabrera goes shopping, she brings along her mental checklist of things to avoid. It includes products with artery-clogging trans fats, cholesterol -inducing saturated fats, MSG and the bogeyman du jour, high-fructose corn syrup. That last one, she says, is the hardest to avoid unless she happens to be shopping in the small natural-foods section of her supermarket. As she pushed her shopping cart down an aisle of the Super Stop & Shop near her hometown of Warren, R.I., recently, Ms. Cabrera, a retired schoolteacher, offered her thoughts on why she steers clear of high-fructose corn syrup: "It's been linked to obesity , and it's just not something that's natural or good for you." This is the perception that many consumers have of the syrup, a synthetic sweetener that has replaced plain old sugar and become a ubiquitous ingredient in American processed foods. High-fructose corn syrup provides the sweet zing in everything from Coke, Pepsi and Snapple iced tea to Dannon yogurt and Chips Ahoy cookies. It also lurks in unexpected places, like Ritz crackers, Wonder bread, Wishbone ranch dressing and Campbell's tomato soup. In the news media and on myriad Web sites, high-fructose corn syrup has been labeled "the Devil's candy," a "sinister invention," "the crack of sweeteners" and "crud." Many scientific articles and news reports have noted that since 1980, obesity rates have climbed at a rate remarkably similar to that of high-fructose corn syrup consumption. A distant derivative of corn, the highly processed syrup was created in the late 1960's and has become a hard-to-avoid staple of the American diet over the last 25 years. It spooks foodies, parents and nutritionists alike. But is it really that bad? "There's no substantial evidence to support the idea tha Continue reading >>

Why You Should Never Eat High Fructose Corn Syrup

Why You Should Never Eat High Fructose Corn Syrup

Renaissance physician Paracelsus famously said, “The dose makes the poison,” meaning that even harmless substances can become toxic if you eat enough of them. Many people ask me, “Is high fructose syrup really that bad for you?” And my answer to this question is “Yes,” mainly for this very reason. In America today, we are eating huge doses of sugar, especially high fructose corn syrup. It is sweeter and cheaper than regular sugar and is in every processed food and sugar-sweetened drink. Purging it from your diet is the single best thing you can do for your health! In recent history, we’ve gone from 20 teaspoons of sugar per person per year to about 150 pounds of sugar per person per year. That’s a half pound a day for every man, woman, and child in America. The average 20-ounce soda contains 15 teaspoons of sugar, all of it high fructose corn syrup. And when you eat sugar in those doses, it becomes a toxin. As part of the chemical process used to make high fructose corn syrup, the glucose and fructose — which are naturally bound together — become separated. This allows the fructose to mainline directly into your liver, which turns on a factory of fat production in your liver called lipogenesis. This leads to fatty liver, the most common disease in America today, affecting 90 million Americans. This, in turn, leads to diabesity — pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. So, high fructose corn syrup is the real driver of the current epidemic of heart attacks, strokes, cancer, dementia, and of course, Type 2 diabetes. HFCS contains dangerous chemicals and contaminants Beside the ginormous load of pure fructose and sugar found in HCFS, as an added bonus, it contains other chemical toxins. Chemical contaminants used during manufacturing end up in the HFCS and Continue reading >>

Is High-fructose Corn Syrup Worse Than Regular Sugar?

Is High-fructose Corn Syrup Worse Than Regular Sugar?

The claim: High-fructose corn syrup is worse for you than regular table sugar (sucrose). The facts: High-fructose corn syrup has been blamed for everything from obesity and dementia to heart attacks and strokes. But the truth is far more complicated, so some background is in order: Table sugar (sucrose, from sugar cane or sugar beets) is made up of fructose (also found in fruit and honey) and glucose (the simplest sugar, used for energy by the body). High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), on the other hand, is derived from cornstarch, which consists of a chain of only glucose molecules. To create HFCS, enzymes are added to cornstarch to convert much of the glucose to fructose. Food manufacturers favor HFCS because its cheaper than sucrose. The most common forms contain either 42 percent fructose (mainly used in processed foods) or 55 percent fructose (mainly used in soft drinks). So, sucrosewhich is about 50 percent fructoseis actually higher in fructose than some HFCS. While both glucose and fructose are simple sugars that provide 4 calories per gram, the body processes them differently . Glucose is metabolized by several organs (including the brain, liver, muscles, and fat tissue) and has a direct effect on blood sugar and insulin levels. Fructose is metabolized primarily by the liver, and though it does not have a significant effect on blood sugar or insulin levels, it can have a more immediate effect on triglycerides (fats in the blood). Both human and animal studies show that when fructose is consumed in excess it can lead not only to higher triglycerides but also to a fatty liver, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased levels of uric acid (which causes gout ). The difference in how the body handles the two sugars has led to the belief that HFCS is much worse for Continue reading >>

How Bad For You Is High-fructose Corn Syrup?

How Bad For You Is High-fructose Corn Syrup?

How bad for you is high-fructose corn syrup? If you want to cut down drastically the amount of processed food you eat, don't buy anything that has high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in it. Unfortunately, you'll have to have a strong liking for the taste of lettuce and notebook paper, because HFCS is in nearly everything: jelly, juice, sodas, whole-grain breads, cereals, ketchup, crackers, yogurt, sweet pickles, applesauce, salad dressing, ice cream, cough syrup and lots more. So what is it? First, let's take a look at fructose. Fructose is a naturally occurring simple sugar that's produced by many plants. It's very sweet, and it's more soluble in water than glucose, another simple sugar that's also made readily available by nature and is the body's main source of energy. Fructose and glucose have the same type of atoms but are put together differently. When you combine fructose with glucose, you wind up with sucrose, which is your basic table sugar. Corn syrup is a glucose-heavy syrup made from corn starch. There's no fructose in corn syrup -- not naturally, at least. In 1957, researchers discovered an enzyme that could turn the glucose in corn syrup into fructose. This process was modified and improved upon in the 1970s, making it possible to mass-produce HFCS. The entire process involves several steps and three different enzymes , but eventually a syrup with around 90 percent fructose content is created, and this is blended down with untreated syrup (containing only glucose) into a mix of either 42 percent or 55 percent fructose. The rest is glucose. Knowing that it tastes delicious, should we go ahead and assume high-fructose corn syrup is also incredibly bad for us? Many people think it is, pointing to the rise in obesity and diabetes that seems to have mirrored the r Continue reading >>

Glucose-fructose Syrup

Glucose-fructose Syrup

You wanted to snack a single cookie, but then you have realized you have eaten a whole box? Are you quenching your thirst with fizzy drinks, but still want to drink more? The reason is not the lack of self-discipline, but a type of sugar that is found in most processed products. Glucose-fructose syrup (high-fructose corn syrup, HFCS) is a type of corn syrup. It is produced in such a way that glucose is converted to fructose with the help of enzymes in order to achieve the desired sweetness. That creates a mixture of glucose and fructose, which is called glucose-fructose syrup. Manufacturers often use glucose-fructose syrup as it is significantly cheaper than sugar. In addition, HFCS extends the shelf life of the product. Of course, this additive is very "desirable" in the world of fast food. Glucose-fructose syrup is widely used as a substitute for sugar in many fizzy drinks, juices, yogurts, cereals, pastries and ready-made soups. Unfortunately, like many other additives, glucose-fructose syrup has a devastating effect on our health. Glucose-fructose syrup is a danger not only to our weight. Fructose is generally a poison for our body because it is not seen as food by our brain. Fructose, like glucose, is a simple sugar. The only difference is that the fructose matures more slowly in our intestines than glucose, and then enters the bloodstream more slowly that is why its absorption is limited. Fructose enters the liver where via bloodstream and then it is either converted to glucose and stored as glycogen or converted into fat and stored in the vicinity of vital organs. Research performed on two groups of children has shown that fructose slows metabolism and causes obesity. In addition, it was found that the glucose-fructose syrup contains significant amounts of mercu Continue reading >>

High Fructose Corn Syrup (glucose-fructose)

High Fructose Corn Syrup (glucose-fructose)

High Fructose Corn Syrup (Glucose-Fructose) I've touched on this topic before, but I think it is worth the reminder that if we really want to maintain or regain our health, we really MUST avoid high fructose corn syrup like the plague. On food labels as Fructose-Glucose in Canada, high-fructose sweeteners are also deceptively labeled as inulin, iso-glucose, dahlia syrup, tapioca syrup, glucose syrup, corn syrup, crystalline fructose, agave syrup, and even fruit fructose. High-fructose sweeteners whether made from corn or from agave do a really good job of messing up our metabolism, which leads to diseases like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis and cancer. The food-processing industry turned away from sugar from sugar cane and sugar beet when they discovered that a far less expensive, far sweeter sweetener that actually extended shelf life could be made from corn. So, from about 1970 when it was introduced into the food supply, we have been consuming larger and larger quantities of fructose, and interestingly enough, the rise in obesity levels has paralleled this increase. I admit that over that time we have also become less active, so clearly fructose is not entirely to blame, but all the same, it gives pause for thought. Fructose was initially hailed as a boon to diabetics as it does not raise insulin levels like glucose does when it is metabolized.However, over time, high fructose consumption seems to increase insulin resistance by reducing insulin's affinity to its receptor, which causes the body to put out more insulin, further worsening the situation for diabetics. We now know that fructose is metabolized exclusively by the liver, converting into triglycerides (fats) very quickly. Fatty livers, increased triglycerides and uric acid i Continue reading >>

High Fructose Corn Syrup And Fructose, The Differences

High Fructose Corn Syrup And Fructose, The Differences

High Fructose Corn Syrup and Fructose, The Differences There is a great deal of confusion about fructose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). They are not the same. The term high fructose corn syrup (also known as corn sugar) suggests that HFCS is a fructose sweetener but this is only partly true. In fact, corn sugar contains nearly equal amounts of the simple sugars glucose and fructose. A range of formulas of HFCS with varying ratios of fructose to glucose are used in various food applications, such baked good, beverages, processed fruits, condiments, frozen desserts, jams, jellies, and pickles. Fructose, a simple sweetener, naturally occurring in many fruits and vegetables, is also found in the added sugars, sucrose, crystalline fructose and corn sugar. Sucrose is made up of glucose and fructose so is very similar in composition to high fructose corn syrup. Crystalline fructose can be produced from corn starch or sucrose and contains fructose alone. Crystalline fructose is primarily used in dry mix beverages, low-calorie products, flavored water, still and carbonated beverages, sports and energy drinks, chocolate milk, breakfast cereals, baked goods, yogurt, fruit packs and confections. Since pure crystalline fructose and sucrose have their own unique properties, each is uniquely suited for different applications. Fructose is the sweetest of all nutritive sweeteners with approximately 1.2 to 1.8 times the sweetness of sucrose in most food applications. Less fructose can be used to achieve the same sweetness, thereby saving calories. Importantly, fructose also has a low glycemic index and does not cause surges and dips in blood glucose levels relative to glucose and sucrose. Fructose reacts synergistically with other sweeteners and starches in a way that boosts the s Continue reading >>

5 Reasons High Fructose Corn Syrup Will Kill You

5 Reasons High Fructose Corn Syrup Will Kill You

IF YOU CAN’T CONVINCE THEM, CONFUSE THEM – Harry Truman The current media debate about the benefits (or lack of harm) of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in our diet misses the obvious. The average American increased their consumption of HFCS (mostly from sugar sweetened drinks and processed food) from zero to over 60 pounds per person per year. During that time period, obesity rates have more than tripled and diabetes incidence has increased more than seven fold. Not perhaps the only cause, but a fact that cannot be ignored. Doubt and confusion are the currency of deception, and they sow the seeds of complacency. These are used skillfully through massive print and television advertising campaigns by the Corn Refiners Association’s attempt to dispel the “myth” that HFCS is harmful and assert through the opinion of “medical and nutrition experts” that it is no different than cane sugar. It is a “natural” product that is a healthy part of our diet when used in moderation. Except for one problem. When used in moderation it is a major cause of heart disease, obesity, cancer, dementia, liver failure, tooth decay, and more. The Lengths the Corn Industry Will Go To The goal of the corn industry is to call into question any claim of harm from consuming high fructose corn syrup, and to confuse and deflect by calling their product natural “corn sugar”. That’s like calling tobacco in cigarettes natural herbal medicine. In the ad, the father tells us: “Like any parent I have questions about the food my daughter eats–-like high fructose corn syrup. So I started looking for answers from medical and nutrition experts, and what I discovered whether it’s corn sugar or cane sugar your body can’t tell the difference. Sugar is sugar. Knowing that makes me fee Continue reading >>

High-fructose Corn Syrup

High-fructose Corn Syrup

"HFCS" redirects here. It is not to be confused with HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons) . Structural formulae of fructose (left) and glucose (right) High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) (also called glucose-fructose, isoglucose and glucose-fructose syrup [1] [2] ) is a sweetener made from corn starch that has been processed by glucose isomerase to convert some of its glucose into fructose . HFCS was first marketed in the early 1970s by the Clinton Corn Processing Company, together with the Japanese Agency of Industrial Science and Technology where the enzyme was discovered in 1965. [3] :5 As a sweetener, HFCS is often compared to granulated sugar , but manufacturing advantages of HFCS over sugar include that it is easier to handle and more cost-effective. [4] The United States Food and Drug Administration has determined that HFCS is a safe ingredient for food and beverage manufacturing. [5] There is debate over whether HFCS presents greater health risks than other sweeteners. [6] Uses and exports of HFCS from American producers have continued to grow during the early 21st century . [7] Apart from comparisons between HFCS and table sugar, there is some evidence that the overconsumption of added sugar in any form, including HFCS, is a major health problem, especially for onset of obesity . [4] [8] [9] Consuming added sugars, particularly as sweetened soft drinks , is strongly linked to weight gain. [4] [10] The World Health Organization has recommended that people limit their consumption of added sugars to 10% of calories, but experts say that typical consumption of empty calories in the United States is nearly twice that level. [10] In the U.S., HFCS is among the sweeteners that mostly replaced sucrose (table sugar) in the food industry. [11] Factors in the rise of HFCS use include p Continue reading >>

What Is A Glucose-fructose Syrup And How Is It Made?

What Is A Glucose-fructose Syrup And How Is It Made?

What is a glucose-fructose syrup and how is it made? It is a sweet syrup made from starch extracted from grains and vegetables. It has a similar composition to table sugar which is made from sugar cane or beet they both consist of glucose and fructose, albeit in different proportions. Table sugar consists of 50% fructose and 50% glucose. Glucose-fructose syrups made in the EU typically contain 20, 30 or 42% of fructose and the rest is glucose. A fascinating thing about the glucose-fructose syrup is that when extracting it from starch, the starch producers can regulate the amount of fructose in it to make the syrup as sweet as table sugar or less sweet, if needed. If the glucose-fructose syrup is made to be as sweet as table sugar, it is often used as an alternative. It is easier to use glucose-fructose syrups than table sugar in some foods because these syrups are liquid unlike table sugar, which is crystallised. Thus, they are easier to blend with other ingredients in creams, ice creams, drinks and other liquid or semi-liquid foods. In the EU glucose-fructose syrups are labelled as such in the ingredients list on a product pack. Continue reading >>

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