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What Is Blood Sugar Spike

How To Prevent Blood Sugar & Triglyceride Spikes After Meals

How To Prevent Blood Sugar & Triglyceride Spikes After Meals

Previously, I’ve covered the effect adding berries to a meal has on blood sugar responses in If Fructose is Bad, What About Fruit? That raises the question: How Much Fruit is Too Much? In addition to the all-fruit jam question, in my next video I’ll cover The Effects of Avocados and Red Wine on Postprandial Inflammation. Vinegar may also help: Can Vinegar Help with Blood Sugar Control? Maybe this explains part of the longevity benefit of nut consumption. See Nuts May Help Prevent Death. I also talked about that immediate inflammatory reaction to unhealthy food choices in my recent video, Best Foods to Improve Sexual Function. Surprised by the chicken and butter reaction? Same thing happens with tuna fish, and other meat. Check out Paleo Diets May Negate Benefits of Exercise. If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here. Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight By Balancing Your Blood Sugar (5 Easy Ways)

How To Lose Weight By Balancing Your Blood Sugar (5 Easy Ways)

All of these years, you’ve been told that counting calories, following point systems, and choking down fat-burning pills are the ultimate solutions for weight loss. And as one of America’s most profitable industries, fad-diet quick-fixes make tall promises, which only yield short-term (and often disappointing) results. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 The truth is, there’s an easier way to lose the weight—and it has nothing to do with miracle nutrients, detox teas, or dieting. Instead, sustainable weight loss can be achieved by learning how to balance your blood-sugar levels. What is Blood Sugar, and How Does it Work? You may want to hit the snooze button when it comes to blood sugar 101. But having imbalanced blood-sugar levels could be the exact reason why you’re not losing weight—especially if you feel like you’ve tried everything else to no avail. Blood sugar simply refers to the amount of sugar (or glucose) in your blood, which comes from carbohydrates. Whenever you eat, your body receives an influx of nutrients, including carbohydrates. During digestion, carbohydrates are broken down into sugar molecules and sent to your bloodstream, which naturally raises your blood-sugar levels. The hormone insulin is then released to bring the sugar out of your blood—and into your cells to be converted into energy. That sounds simple enough, right? Just a regular biological process… No big deal. But here’s where the connection between blood sugar and weight gain comes in. How Imbalanced Blood-Sugar Levels Can Make You Fat You see, your body only needs so much energy at once. So if your energy stores are already full at the time of digesting the carbohydrates, any excess sugar from Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Diabetes is a disease that causes a person's blood sugar to become too high. This can lead to various complications. A person with diabetes must be careful to keep their blood sugar levels under control. Glucose comes from the food we eat. It is the main source of energy for the body. The pancreas secretes substances, including the hormone insulin, and enzymes. Enzymes break down food. Insulin makes it possible for body cells to absorb the glucose we consume. With diabetes, either the pancreas is unable to produce insulin to help the glucose get into the body cells, or the body becomes resistant to the insulin. The glucose stays in the blood instead. This is what raises blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is known as hyperglycemia. Contents of this article: Causes of blood sugar spikes People with diabetes have to be especially careful about keeping their blood sugar levels under control. There are several reasons why blood glucose levels may spike. These are: Sleep: A lack of sleep can be especially bad for people with diabetes, because it can also raise blood sugar levels. One study performed on Japanese men found that getting under 6.5 hours of sleep each night increases a person's risk for high blood glucose levels. Prioritizing healthy sleep and promoting sleep hygiene are good habits for everyone, but especially for people with diabetes. Stress: When under a lot of stress, the body produces hormones that make it difficult for insulin to do its job, so more glucose stays in the bloodstream. Finding a way to keep stress levels down, such as yoga or meditation, is essential for people with diabetes. Exercise: Having a sedentary lifestyle can cause blood sugar levels to go up. In addition, exercise that is too difficult can cause stress and blood glucose levels to ri Continue reading >>

Healthy Foods That Do Not Spike Blood Sugar

Healthy Foods That Do Not Spike Blood Sugar

Your blood sugar levels rise when you consume foods with easily accessible carbohydrates, potentially increasing your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity or other health problems. Selecting foods based on their glycemic index, a system that ranks foods based on their potential effect on your blood sugar levels, helps you to find foods that keep your blood sugar levels low; the lower the GI ranking, the less of an impact on your blood sugar levels. Glycemic Index of 20 or Lower Foods without carbohydrates, including meats, eggs and fish, do not have a GI index ranking and do not have a notable impact on your blood sugar levels. Ranked foods with a score of less than 20 also have minimal impact. Such foods include carrots, eggplant, cauliflower, green beans, broccoli, peppers, onions, lettuce, zucchini, tomatoes, peanuts and walnuts. These foods are generally safe for you to eat at each meal without spiking your blood sugar. Cooking raw vegetables makes their carbohydrates more bioavailable and increases their GI ranking -- eat vegetables raw for the smallest impact on your blood sugar. Glycemic Index of 21 to 40 A GI ranking of 21 to 40 represents a small impact on your blood sugar levels. Many vegetables with an otherwise low GI ranking, such as carrots, jump into the 21 to 40 category when cooked. Examples of foods in this small-to-moderate category include peas, beans, lentils, whole wheat pasta, egg noodles, wheat tortillas, pearled barley, rye, cherries, plums, grapefruit, apples, apricots, milk, yogurt and soy milk. Enjoy these foods in moderation to keep your blood sugar in check. Glycemic Index of 41 to 60 Foods with a GI rank of 41 to 60 have a moderate impact on your blood sugar. Examples include rolled oats, kidney beans, chickpeas, popcorn, sweet potatoe Continue reading >>

8 Fruit Smoothie Ingredients That Won't Spike Your Blood Sugar

8 Fruit Smoothie Ingredients That Won't Spike Your Blood Sugar

They pack tons of nutrition into a small transportable cup, and often, they taste more like a dessert than a healthy snack or meal, but smoothies aren’t without their faults. If you concoct or order the wrong blend, your refreshing drink can spike your blood sugar, leaving you queasy and feeling overall blah, rather than satisfied. Unfortunately, I discovered this the hard way. I’ve tried numerous times to hop on the smoothie bandwagon. They seem like the perfect post-workout snack when I can’t go home to eat, or an easy option when I need to have breakfast on the run. But no matter what I order, smoothies always seem to leave me feeling nauseous—like I’ve just taken a very bumpy ride in the back of a car while reading a book. (You know the feeling.) And being that I’m a full-time health editor, I was determined to find out what could be going on. So I turned to the pros: According to Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, the creator of the Free 7 Day Diabetes Meal Plan, even if a smoothie is overflowing with healthy foods, it can cause blood sugar levels to spike if it isn’t made with the right blend or ratios of ingredients. This, of course, leaves you feeling not-so-awesome. “When blood sugar levels rise and fall quickly, the body's metabolism may get interrupted which can lead to feelings of nausea,” Zanini says. What’s more, the insulin that rushes to get excess sugar out of your blood and into your cells can cause a blood sugar crash. This can leave you feeling fatigued and hungry, explains Alissa Rumsey MS, RD, CSCS, owner of Alissa Rumsey Nutrition and Wellness in New York City. Those with diabetes will have different, but just as uncomfortable side effects. “If you have diabetes and spike your blood sugar with a smoothie, or any other food or drink for th Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

back to Overview Markus, one of our great German-language authors, wrote about struggling with high blood sugar after exercise. I know it's a common problem, and one I've struggled with personally, so I want to make sure you get to see it, too. From Markus Berndt: It’s one of the first recommendations you get after being diagnosed with diabetes. “Get active, do more exercise, it’s good for you!” And since we’ve been a child we’ve heard that exercise is healthy. If we do it consistently we’re rewarded, literally, with an awesome beach body. Adding exercise into our day is also good for our diabetes. We’re taught that exercise lowers blood sugar, right? But can the opposite also be true? Can you have high blood sugar after exercise? Up close We now know that physical activity usually lowers blood sugar because it reduces how much insulin is needed to move sugar into the cells. While, in the past, most experts advised frequent training intervals at moderate intensity, but recent studies have shown that even short, intense workouts are very effective. For example, a 15-minute intense weight training lowered blood sugar even more than what’s seen in some endurance training. So activity lowers blood sugar – but not always! Personally, I experienced this very early on and was extremely irritated! I just learned that exercise lowers blood sugar, but an intense 45-minute run consistently resulted in higher blood sugars than when I started! What in the world? At first, I was confused and felt like I didn’t understand the world anymore. Then it was more of a “would you look at this?” kind of thing. And finally, I was determined to figure out what was happening. I knew there had to be an explanation. Why does exercise sometimes raise blood sugar? Exercise Continue reading >>

The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster

The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster

Controlling your blood sugar levels is absolutely critical to controlling your mood, energy, and motivation. If you’ve ever known someone that is very “Jekyll and Hyde”, there is a very good chance that they are constantly riding what is commonly referred to as the “Blood Sugar Rollercoaster.” Signs that a person is riding the Blood Sugar Rollercoaster They: Fly off the handle for no reason Take things very personally “Don’t wanna hear it” If they are not hyper, they are weepy or depressed Can’t control their actions and emotions What Makes Up Our Blood Sugar? Your blood sugar level is determined by the carbs that you eat. Eating the wrong type of carbs will send you for a ride on the rollercoaster. Eating the right type of carb will keep you safely off the rollercoaster, allowing you to have happy, energetic, and fun moods. So which carbs are the wrong carbs to eat? Let’s first break down carbs into groups. For our purposes, carbohydrates can be separated into 3 groups: Sugar Refined Grains Whole Grains Sugar includes any and all sweets. Candy, milk chocolate, soda pop, flavored coffee drinks, etc. Refined Grains include white flour, white bread, white rice, and other things commonly used to make baked goods, prepackaged foods, and sweets. Whole Grains include 100% whole wheat flour, 100% whole wheat bread, 100% whole wheat pasta, brown rice, quinoa, kasha, farro, and other whole grains. For our purposes, fruit can also be put into the complex category because fruit come packed with fiber, which slows digestion of carbs. Now let’s look at what your body does when you eat carbs: Any time you eat a carbohydrate, your body digests it, converts it into “glucose”, and sends this glucose into your blood. Glucose is what sugar is called once it is in Continue reading >>

Why Blood Sugar Levels Rise Overnight

Why Blood Sugar Levels Rise Overnight

get the scoop When you go to bed, your blood sugar reading is 110, but when you wake up in the morning, it has shot up to 150. Why does this happen? To understand how blood sugar levels can rise overnight without your eating anything, we have to look at where glucose comes from — and where it goes — while we sleep. During the day, the carbohydrates we eat are digested into glucose and absorbed into the bloodstream. Some of this glucose goes to the liver, where it is stored for later use. At night, while we are asleep, the liver releases glucose into the bloodstream. The liver acts as our glucose warehouse and keeps us supplied until we eat breakfast. The amount of glucose being used is matched by the amount of glucose being released by the liver, so blood sugar levels should remain constant. what is the dawn phenomenon? A rise in blood sugar level between approximately 3 A.M. and the time you wake up is called the “dawn phenomenon.” The liver is supposed to release just enough glucose to replace what is being used, and insulin works as the messenger to tell the liver how much is enough. But if there's not enough insulin (as with type 1 diabetes), or if there's enough insulin but it cannot communicate its message to the liver (as with type 2 diabetes), the liver starts to release glucose much too quickly. In addition, levels of hormones such as cortisol begin to increase in the early morning hours, which can contribute to altered insulin sensitivity. The result? Blood sugar levels rise. This is why blood sugar levels can go up between the time you go to bed and the time you wake up. what can you do about it? You might be able to make changes in the timing of your meals, medications, or insulin injections to help prevent dawn phenomenon. First, keep a detailed rec Continue reading >>

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

If you have type 2 diabetes and your blood sugar levels are racing up and down like a roller coaster, it's time to get off the ride. Big swings in your blood sugar can make you feel lousy. But even if you aren't aware of them, they can still increase your risk for a number of serious health problems. By making simple but specific adjustments to your lifestyle and diet, you can gain better blood-sugar control. Your body uses the sugar, also known as glucose, in the foods you eat for energy. Think of it as a fuel that keeps your body moving throughout the day. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Type 2 diabetes decreases the body’s production of insulin, which is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in the blood and can damage nerves and blood vessels. This increase of blood sugar also increases your risk for heart disease and stroke. Over time, high blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, can lead to more health problems, including kidney failure and blindness. "Keeping blood sugar stable can help prevent the long-term consequences of fluctuations," says Melissa Li-Ng, MD, an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Dr. Li-Ng explains that high blood sugar can cause a number of symptoms that include: Fatigue Increased thirst Blurry vision Frequent urination It's also important to know that you can have high blood sugar and still feel fine, but your body can still suffer damage, Li-Ng says. Symptoms of high blood sugar typically develop at levels above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). "You can have high blood sugar that's between 150 and 199 and feel perfectly fine," Li-Ng says. Over time, your body can also get used to chronically high blood sugar levels, so you don’t feel the symptoms, she says. On the flip side, if you Continue reading >>

50 Foods That Won’t Spike Blood Sugar

50 Foods That Won’t Spike Blood Sugar

Blood sugar (or blood glucose) is most dependent on carbohydrate sources. But since carbohydrates embraces a wide variety of foods (whole grains, produce, milk, pastries, etc.), controlling blood sugars may be confusing and complex to manage. And with the effects of high blood sugar being harmful to health, regulating them takes high precedence. Effects of High Blood Sugar Though blood sugar spikes are oftentimes inevitable, they should not be a consistent phenomenon. Initial signs of high blood sugar (also known as hyperglycemia) consist of increased thirst and frequent urination. But constant and long-term spikes can create much bigger consequences and include cardiovascular (heart) disease, nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney damage (diabetic nephropathy) or failure, damage to the retina's blood vessels (diabetic retinopathy), poor blood circulation to the feet (potentially leading to infections or amputations), mouth and skin infections and non-healing wounds, along with bone and joint complications. More severe complications require emergency attention and include diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. How to Control Blood Sugar Spikes As mentioned above, constant high blood sugar and spikes can startle and damage the body and its systems. The glycemic index (GI) measures how foods affect blood sugars, based on a one to 100 number scale. Low GI foods have a mild effect on blood sugars while high GI foods have a much greater impact. So to keep blood sugars unshaken, stray away from highly sweetened items and go for non-carbohydrate or lower GI foods. Non-Carbohydrate Foods Meats, fats and oils are essentially absent of carbohydrates. Importantly, be mindful of the preparation method as breaded and battered meats will mostly contain some sort of Continue reading >>

10 Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

10 Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

When you first found out you had diabetes, you tested your blood sugar often to understand how food, activity, stress and illness could affect your blood sugar levels. By now, you’ve got it figured out for the most part, right? But suddenly — BAM! Something makes your blood sugar zoom up. You try to adjust it with food or activity or insulin, and it dips low. You’re on that rollercoaster no one with diabetes wants to ride. Knowledge is power! Look out for these surprising triggers that can send your blood sugar soaring: 1 – Heat Extreme heat (in baths or hot tubs) can cause blood vessels to dilate, which makes insulin absorb more quickly and could lead to low blood sugar. 2 – Artificial sweeteners More research needs to be done, but some studies show that they can raise blood sugar. 3 – Coffee Even without sweetener, coffee can raise blood sugar, due to the caffeine. Some people are extra-sensitive to caffeine. 4 – Losing sleep Just one night of poor sleep can make your body use insulin less efficiently. 5 – Skipping breakfast Going without that morning meal can increase blood sugar after both lunch and dinner. 6 – Time of day The later it gets, the harder blood sugar can be to control. 7 – The “Dawn Phenomenon” People have a surge in hormones early in the morning, whether they have diabetes or not. For people with diabetes, this means blood sugar can spike. 8 – Dehydration Less water in your body means a higher blood sugar concentration. 9 – Nasal sprays Some sprays have chemicals that trigger your liver to release more sugar into your bloodstream. 10 – Gum disease It’s both a complication of diabetes and a cause for blood sugar spiking. Watch out for other triggers that can make your blood sugar spike. If an activity, food or situation Continue reading >>

Controlling After-meal Blood Sugar Spikes

Controlling After-meal Blood Sugar Spikes

When blood sugar levels spike too high after eating and remain elevated for two hours, this presents a significant mortality risk factor.1 These kinds of surges in after-meal glucose (sugar) surges are associated with prediabetes and diabetes.2,3 Reducing after-meal glucose levels has the potential to help prevent many common aging disorders. Elevated glucose not only promotes vascular disease, but is associated with an increased risk of dementia, cancer, worse outcomes in those stricken with cancer—and even accelerated aging.4-15 Researchers have found that an increased 2-hour postprandial (after-meal) glucose level is an independent risk predictor for cardiovascular and all-cause death.1 During this postprandial period, blood sugar spikes can acutely impair blood flow through vital arteries,16 which can ultimately lead to heart attack or stroke. Fortunately, published studies have identified three natural agents that can safely impede glucose absorption, reduce glucose over-production in the liver, and enhance clearance of excess glucose from the bloodstream.17-21 Glucose Spikes Boost Heart Attack Risk After-meal surges in blood sugar directly impair the arteries’ ability to respond to the heart’s demand for an immediate increase in blood flow.22,23 This is one reason that diabetics have such a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease.24 But even if you don’t have diabetes, a “normal” fasting blood sugar measurement doesn’t protect you against the harmful effects of an after-meal glucose spike.22,23,25,26 People who have normal fasting glucose, but fail a measurement of blood sugar two hours after a meal are diagnosed with “impaired glucose tolerance.” Their risk for cardiovascular disease rises sharply, which correlates with the inability of their Continue reading >>

Stop The Spikes!

Stop The Spikes!

By the dLife Editors You probably know what kinds of things make your blood sugar go skyrocketing — maybe it’s pasta, orange juice, cereal, or banana. But sometimes it’s less clear what pulls your glucose levels in the other direction. When you eat a higher-carb food, what have you found that softens the subsequent spike? What are some natural options for lowering blood sugar? Take this quiz and test your knowledge of the Spike Stoppers! Reviewed by Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN 07/14. Continue reading >>

Can Milk Spike Your Blood Sugar?

Can Milk Spike Your Blood Sugar?

When the afternoon slump strikes and you’re searching for a quick fix to amp up your energy, you’re probably inclined to reach for a candy bar or caffeinated soda. And while those treats can certainly do the trick, they’re much more harmful than helpful -- unless, of course, you don’t mind an extra bit of jiggle around your middle. Rather than relying on these high-calorie habits, swap them for a beverage that’s just as effective at increasing blood sugar, but with a few extra nutritional perks. Carbs and Sugar Carbohydrates are the main culprit in blood sugar spikes. When compared to proteins and fats, carbs have a much more significant impact on your body’s glucose levels -- which is why they’re so important for maintaining energy. One 8-ounce serving of milk has about 12 to 15 grams of carbs, which is right on par with its fellow carb-containing foods. Nearly all starchy foods, vegetables, fruits and yogurt have roughly the same amount of carbohydrates per serving. Watch the Load Although you should count carbs, you can’t always count on them. A carb-filled food or beverage will certainly increase blood sugar -- that's just a scientific fact. But it’s the glycemic load that really determines the impact. Foods and beverages with similar carb counts are compared to determine which ones cause a quicker blood sugar spike; this determines the glycemic index. The GI then takes into consideration how many grams of carbs are found in one serving; this determines the glycemic load. The lower the glycemic load, the less impact on blood sugar and insulin levels. Since milk has a glycemic load of about 4 to 5, it will cause your blood sugar to increase, but it won't cause a rapid spike in glucose levels. A blood sugar spike is more common with apple juice, whic Continue reading >>

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