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What Is Blood Sugar Monitoring

How Often Should A Type 2 Diabetic Monitor His Or Her Blood Sugar?

How Often Should A Type 2 Diabetic Monitor His Or Her Blood Sugar?

There’s no general answer to this as patients are on different medications and in different situations. The treating physician needs to make recommendations on glucose monitoring appropriate to the individual patient. For instance, while starting long-acting insulin, it may be appropriate to get a fasting blood sugar every morning until the appropriate dose of insulin is reached, but routine monitoring may not be needed after that and might only be required with symptoms. More broadly, though, I agree with Dr. Clark’s answer. Many, many patients with type 2 diabetes on metformin seem to be told to monitor blood sugars as if they were type 1 diabetics on insulin, even though they are having no symptoms of hypoglycemia and are at extremely low risk for hypoglycemia. And yet nearly all decisions on therapy in such patients will be based on the A1c level and not on those several-times-a-day blood sugar recordings. Some diabetologists argue that frequent monitoring helps patients realize the effects of high glycemic foods on their blood sugar control, but the randomized trial evidence is pretty unconvincing that this is helpful. Continue reading >>

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

Our Process We spent over 80 hours researching the best 30 glucometers on the market. We considered the specifications, features, user reviews, medical studies, availability and cost. After eliminating models that used old technology, like coding, or were too difficult to find in stores, we purchased the best 12 blood glucose meters so we could perform hands-on evaluations of each device. Before diving into our recommendations for the best glucometers, it’s important to note that Top Ten Reviews is not a substitute for your primary care physician. Our recommendations are made based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but they’re not a replacement for advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. $19.99 The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from its main feature – Bluetooth that connects it to a mobile app on your smartphone. This provides excellent data management of your readings so you can spot patterns and better treat your diabetes. In addition, the device's interface is one of the easiest to navigate. It has multiple buttons so you can get to the features you need quickly, and the display is high-contrast with big numbers. Another reason why the Aviva Connect is the best glucometer is the availability of its test strips – they are everywhere. We couldn't find a pharmacy or online store that didn't stock them. Of course, the one significant downside to the test strips is their cost. At $1.39 per strip in a pack of 100 and $1.52 per strip in a pack of 50, they’re more expensive than most test strips on the market. Best Glucometer for Value & Availability $13.95 The CONTOUR NEXT is our pick for the best glucometer if your primary concerns are overall value and the availability o Continue reading >>

Apple Has A Secret Team Working On The Holy Grail For Treating Diabetes

Apple Has A Secret Team Working On The Holy Grail For Treating Diabetes

Apple has hired a small team of biomedical engineers to work at a nondescript office in Palo Alto, California, miles from corporate headquarters. They are part of a super secret initiative, initially envisioned by the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, to develop sensors that can noninvasively and continuously monitor blood sugar levels to better treat diabetes, according to three people familiar with the matter. Such a breakthrough would be a "holy grail" for life sciences. Many life sciences companies have tried and failed, as it's highly challenging to track glucose levels accurately without piercing the skin. The initiative is far enough along that Apple has been conducting feasibility trials at clinical sites across the Bay Area and has hired consultants to help it figure out the regulatory pathways, the people said. The efforts have been going on for at least five years, the people said. Jobs envisioned wearable devices, like smartwatches, being used to monitor important vitals, such as oxygen levels, heart rate and blood glucose. In 2010, Apple quietly acquired a company called Cor, after then-CEO Bob Messerschmidt reportedly sent Jobs a cold email on the topic of sensor technologies for health and wellness. Messerschmidt later joined the Apple Watch team. The glucose team is said to report to Johny Srouji, Apple's senior vice president of hardware technologies. According to one of the sources, it was previously led by Michael D. Hillman, who left Apple in late 2015 and later joined Facebook's Oculus as head of hardware. Hillman's LinkedIn page lists him as having had a "confidential role" in hardware technologies at Apple. One person said about 30 people were working in this group as of a year ago. But speculation has been flying around since the company snapped Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

U.S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn’t need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott’s new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. But most don’t do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. “We’re able to lower blood sugar safely” with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott’s device was approved for adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and should be available in pharmacies within months. The company, based near Chicago, did not disclose the price of the reader or the sensors. Abbott’s system can’t be used with an insulin pump, a device worn a Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Testing

Blood Glucose Testing

Tweet Blood glucose testing, also known as blood glucose monitoring, is one of the main tools involved in controlling diabetes. Not everyone with diabetes will test their blood glucose levels but it is regarded as being very beneficial for helping to make diet and medication dosing decisions. If you are on any medication that can lead to hypoglycemia (most notably insulin), you should test your blood glucose levels. What is blood glucose testing? Blood glucose testing is the process used to measure the concentration of glucose in your blood. Blood glucose testing can be carried out at home using a blood glucose meter. A blood test involves pricking your finger with a small needle called a lancet, drawing a drop of blood from the finger and applying it to a test strip that has been engaged into a blood glucose meter. How does blood glucose testing help to control diabetes? Blood glucose testing can help to control diabetes in a number of ways: Informing food choices and portion quantities Assisting medication dosing decisions Identifying periods of high or low blood glucose levels In turn, this can lead to: A reduction in HbA1c (improved long-term glycemic control) A lower risk of serious diabetic complications Reduced depressive symptoms Improved confidence in self-management of diabetes What are the disadvantages of blood glucose testing? Disadvantages of blood glucose testing may include: Pain when pricking fingers Cost of blood glucose testing supplies - if these need to be self-funded Anxiety if no education has been provided on how to interpret and act on the glucose results Who is blood glucose testing suitable for? Many people with diabetes benefit from blood glucose testing if they are provided with education on how to interpret their results and take appropriat Continue reading >>

The Big Picture: Checking Your Blood Glucose

The Big Picture: Checking Your Blood Glucose

If your deductible reset on January 1, there are new programs to help you afford your insulin prescription| Learn more The Big Picture: Checking your Blood Glucose The Big Picture: Checking Your Blood Glucose Blood glucose (bloodsugar) monitoring is the primary tool you have to find out if your blood glucose levels are within your target range. This tells you yourbloodglucoselevelat any one time. Its important forblood glucoselevels to stay in a healthy range. If glucose levels gettoo low, we can lose the ability to think and function normally. If they gettoo highand stay high, it can cause damage orcomplicationsto the body over the course of many years. The logging of your results is vital. When you bring your log to your healthcare provider, youll have a good picture of your body's response to your diabetes care plan. To help keep track of your levels, we have a printable blood glucose log. We also have a blood glucose logavailable for purchase that is smaller so you can carry it with you. Talk to your doctor about whether you should be checking your blood glucose. People who may benefit from checking blood glucose regularly include those: having a hard time controlling blood glucose levels. having low blood glucose levels without the usual warning signs. have ketones from high blood glucose levels. People with diabetes check their blood glucose levels by poking their fingertips and using ablood glucose meter or acontinuous glucose monitor (CGMs)to measure the blood glucose level at that moment. Read on to find out how to use a blood glucose meter. To find out more about CGMs, start by talking to your doctor. After washing your hands, insert a test strip into your meter. Use your lancing device on the side of your fingertip to get a drop of blood. Touch and hold the Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First-ever Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn't Require A Fingerstick

Fda Approves First-ever Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn't Require A Fingerstick

In a milestone for Americans with diabetes, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the first-ever continuous blood sugar monitoring device that doesn’t require patients to take potentially painful and invasive blood tests that require pricking their fingertips to collect samples. The approval was granted to Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. The device, Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, is approved for adult diabetes patients 18 years of age and older, and the approval sent Abbott stock up 3.5% in Thursday trading. It slashes the need for the so-called fingerstick tests that people with diabetes regularly endure to figure out whether their blood sugar levels are too high or too low, and to monitor general fluctuation in blood glucose so they can adjust their diets or medication. The device itself uses an under-the-skin sensor wire which keeps tabs on sugar levels. In order to get a gauge on where those glucose levels are at, users simply have to wave an accompanying, specialized mobile reader device over the sensor like a wand. “The FDA is always interested in new technologies that can help make the care of people living with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, easier and more manageable,” said the FDA’s Donald St. Pierre in a statement. “This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes—with a wave of the mobile reader.” Medical device and tech companies alike have shown growing interest in diabetes management and monitoring devices. Last year, the FDA approved an artificial pancreas from device giant Medtronic to treat people with type 1 diabetes with a largely automated glucos Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Abbott's Blood Glucose Monitoring Device

Fda Approves Abbott's Blood Glucose Monitoring Device

(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it approved Abbott Laboratories’ glucose monitoring device for adults with diabetes, allowing millions of people to track their blood sugar levels without having to prick their fingers. Abbott's FreeStyle Libre Flash reduces the need for fingerstick testing, which is painful and inconvenient, by inserting a small sensor wire below the skin to continuously measure and monitor glucose levels. The device can be worn for up to 10 days. (bit.ly/2xxbrbt) Chicago-based Abbott’s shares were trading up 3.6 percent at $54 after the bell on Wednesday. Traditionally, diabetes patients measured their glucose levels nearly a dozen times a day by pricking their finger tips for blood samples. Nowadays, advanced continuous glucose monitoring devices, such as DexCom Inc’s G5 Mobile and Medtronic Plc’s iPRO2 Professional, which have sensors to measure glucose readings are used. However, these devices require fingertip testing two to four times a day for optimal accuracy. DexCom’s shares were down 14.3 percent at $57.85, while Medtronic’s stock rose marginally in after-market trading. Most diabetes patients do not measure glucose as often as they should because of the discomfort caused by these kinds of tests, Jared Watkin, senior vice president of Abbott’s Diabetes Care unit, told Reuters. According to studies, the majority of people with diabetes test glucose levels less than three times a day, Abbott said. Abbott’s device, however, is a long-lasting glucose sensor, which does not require fingerstick testing to ensure its accuracy. The company plans to launch the device before the end of this year, Watkin said on Wednesday. Abbott already has a continuous glucose monitoring device called FreeStyle Libre Pro in the Uni Continue reading >>

What Are The Main Challenges For A Diabetic Patient In Monitoring His/her Own Health (e.g., Blood Sugar, Food Intake, Exercise)?

What Are The Main Challenges For A Diabetic Patient In Monitoring His/her Own Health (e.g., Blood Sugar, Food Intake, Exercise)?

A diabetic pateient must 1-eat lots of Vegetables (high fibers) ,fruits (low sugar) and reduce fatty meals 2-take a walk 1/2 an hour every day to lose weight 3-monitor their blood glucose readings 4-if prescribed a medication or injection he/she should stick to the dose regimen to prevent any risk of hypo or hyperglycemia i recommend you use an application which is very helpful where you can add your daily meals and blood glucose readings It measures your physical activity stepwise So u can keep a record to you and your physician Here's the link Continue reading >>

What Are Some Good Blood Sugar Monitors Available In India At Reasonable Prices?

What Are Some Good Blood Sugar Monitors Available In India At Reasonable Prices?

I have been using the BeatO smartphone connected glucometer. It's a relatively​ new technology. You can attach the glucometer device on your Smartphone. You can watch a demo here: The glucometer came with 3 months of free diabetes specialist advice. This was very useful as I got a diet chart from them and was able to chat with the BeatO educator whenever I had a problem. I like the glucometer because of the following reasons: 1) I am not so tech savvy but still find it easy to use. 2) You can save data of your readings on the app and view your trends. This makes it easy to understand how your body is reacting to the diet you are following or the exercise regime you follow. 3) You can share your reading with two contacts that you select - family, doctor, the BeatO educator etc. This is a really good feature especially for emergencies. 4) The app has other features like setting reminders and alerts. 5) The strips come individually packaged which is super convenient because you can carry as many as you want and they don’t get damaged or contaminated. 6) I have synced my fitness tracker with the app so it keeps counting those calories as well. For all that the glucometer and app offers it is well worth the price. It was for Rs 1350 when I got it and includes: 1) Glucometer device 2) 20 strips 3) 20 lancets 4) Lancing device 5) 3 month free diabetes specialist advice Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

FDA approves first blood sugar monitor without finger pricks The FDA has approved a device from Abbott that continuously monitors diabetics’ blood sugar levels without requiring backup finger prick tests. .S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn’t need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott’s new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System , approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. Sign up for our Morning Rounds newsletter But most don’t do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. “We’re able to lower blood sugar safely” with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott’s device was approved for ad Continue reading >>

How Often To Test Your Blood Glucose

How Often To Test Your Blood Glucose

Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Checking Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes: Checking Your Blood Sugar

Because you have diabetes, you need to know when your blood sugar level is outside the target range for your body. Fortunately, you can see what your blood sugar level is anywhere and anytime by using a home blood sugar meter (blood glucose meter). Using the meter, you can find out what your blood sugar level is quickly. Knowing your blood sugar level helps you treat low or high blood sugar before it becomes an emergency. It also helps you know how exercise and food affect your blood sugar and how much short-acting insulin (if you take insulin) to take. Most importantly, it helps you feel more in control as you manage life with diabetes. How to test your blood sugar Monitoring your blood sugar level at home takes the guesswork out of your daily diabetes care. You will know what your blood sugar level is at the time of testing. Here is a simple way to get started. Get organized Before you start testing your blood sugar : Talk with your doctor about how often and when you should test your blood sugar. Record your blood sugar testing times(What is a PDF document?). Link testing your blood sugar with other daily activities, such as preparing breakfast or before your afternoon walk. This will help you establish the habit of self-testing. Gather the supplies to test your blood sugar. Keep your supplies together so that you can do a test quickly if needed. Check your equipment before you do each test. Check the expiration date on your testing strips. If you use expired test strips, you may not get accurate results. Many meters don't need a code from the test strips, but some will. If your meter does, make sure the code numbers on the testing strips bottle match the numbers on your meter. If the numbers do not match, follow the directions that come with your meter for changing Continue reading >>

Has An Automatic Low Blood Sugar Monitor Been Invented?

Has An Automatic Low Blood Sugar Monitor Been Invented?

Continuous glucose monitors exist. They monitor sugar levels in your tissue fluid, not your capillary blood. Tissue fluid lags behind capillary blood in terms of response to sugar and insulin (eg. Your blood sugar might be 7.0 mmol/L and trending down but your tidsue fluid might only report what it was 30–60 minutes ago). This means that if you're making treatment decisions based on tissue fluid readings, you're working with old data. It's extraordinary difficult to have a CGM that monitors blood because having foreign objects inserted into blood streams comfortably over long periods of time raises the risk of infection significantly and that's dangerous. So in order to have a CGM that makes treatment decisions and actions for you, it would need to: Have accurate readings, meaning taking measurements from blood. Be safe to leave in your bloodstream for prolonged periods of time. Have access to sugar and insulin. Be able to inject into the correct places. Insulin, sugar, and blood testing all involve different ports, so to speak. And of course, the software needs to reliable enough that you would literally trust it with your life. Current CGM and pump technology are not currently integrated precisely because the software isn't proven to be reliable enough. It's reliable enough to faithfully deliver a basal program and to faithfully carry out bolus instructions from the user, but not to do it all by itself. And even if it were, the legal ramifications of doing those calculations and boluses independently instead of under the supervision of the human are scaaaary. So that's a no from me. And also likely why it's either taking so long or people are simply not interested in getting into it. Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

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