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What Is Atomized Glucose?

Underbelly: Sugars In Ice Cream

Underbelly: Sugars In Ice Cream

Theyre sweet, and they keep the ice cream soft. If youve had homemade ice cream with the consistency of concrete, its because the level of solidsespecially sugarswas too low. Some bloggers and cookbook authors tell you to soften the ice cream by adding alcohol. This works, but you can do better. While alcohol depresses the freezing point, it does so at the expense of smoothness. By increasing the unfrozen portion of water in the ice cream, while doing nothing to help control that water, it will encourage ice crystals to grow larger. Youll end up with a softer but grainier texture. The quick fix would be to add more sugar, but most ice creams are too sweet already. A typical home recipe is 17% or more table sugar by weight: kid stuff. You cannot taste any subtlety through cloying sweetnessyou cant taste the dairy, and you cant taste any of the more delicate, aromatic flavors were going to work so hard to put in there. Its not just home recipes. Haagen Dazs is too sweet. Ben and Jerrys is too sweet. Talenti is too sweet. Cold Stone is too sweet. Every small town homemade ice cream shop Ive ever wandered into: too fricking sweet. I once managed an ice cream shop in Colorado, making ice cream that the owners and I were proud of. It was too goddam sweet, of course, but I had no reasonable frame of reference, until after Id quit and taken a trip to Paris, where I was lucky enough to be invited to dinner at Tailleventa restaurant which at the time had three Michelin stars and which had once been considered the finest in the city. After uncountable savory courses, we were put in the hands of pastry chef Gilles Bajolle , who would soon become the first chef that Id shamelessly steal or reverse-engineer recipes from. He was most famous for his marquise au chocolat with pistachio Continue reading >>

Dextrose Vs. Atomized Glucose: The Same?

Dextrose Vs. Atomized Glucose: The Same?

Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account . I recently bought Atomized glucose from L'epicerie in New York. They sent me Dextrose (labeled D-Glucose Pure) instead. When I called, they said it was the same thing, except one was from wheat and one from something else. Is this correct? Do they have the same sweetening power? I am a little annoyed that they didn't email me to tell me at least. Dextrose is a type of glucose but is sweeter. Atomized glucose has what is called a sweetness coefficent of 50 while dextrose has one of 75. In working with both for ice cream, I prefer atomized glucose. Kind of weird for L'epiceri to just shove some dextrose on you. Dextrose is a type of glucose but is sweeter. Atomized glucose has what is called a sweetness coefficent of 50 while dextrose has one of 75. In working with both for ice cream, I prefer atomized glucose. Kind of weird for L'epiceri to just shove some dextrose on you. Thanks for the info. Well that kind of pisses me off. I emailed them on Sunday about the switcheroo, and they didn't get back to me at all. It was only after I called them that they answered my question. They substituted gel glace for cremodan last time (maybe they are the same I don't know) but now this is twice. Ugh. Anybody have a different vendor that they like? Gel glace is a stabilizer but not the same as Cremodan, which has emulsifiers, etc. If they've done this before, just sent you a different product w/o consulting you, they need to be rep Continue reading >>

Wild Strawberries And Raspberries

Wild Strawberries And Raspberries

In a sundae trifle with fromage blanc sherbet glazed pastry sticks Get the full recipe and enjoy unlimited access to thousands of recipes and videos from the greatest chefs by subscribing to the All My Chefs premium access. Step 1: Making the sherbet, sorbet, and granita Cook water, sugar, and glucose to make sugar syrup. Heat the syrup to 149F (65C). Let cool to 39F (4C) (this step is important), then add the lemon juice and the whipped fromage blanc. Let sit, then freeze in the Pacojet . Prepare the syrup for the strawberry sorbet. Heat water and sugar to 183F (84C), let cool to 39F (4C). Once cold, add the raspberry pulp. Let sit, process in the ice cream maker, and set aside. Macerate strawberries in sugar for 90 minutes in a double boiler on low heat until juices are released. Strain without mashing the berries to make a clear juice. Freeze the juice into a granita. Use a fork to flake the ice. Set aside. Step 2: Preparing the glazed pastry sticks Combine confectioners sugar, egg white, and lemon juice. Use a sheeter to roll the puff pastry dough into a sheet 1/10 inch (2mm) thick, glaze lightly, cut into 3/45 inch (212cm) rectangles with a sharp knife, making precise cuts to avoid pinched edges. Place the sticks on a 1624inch (4060cm) baking sheet topped with a rack supported by 11/4 inch (3cm) pieces of cork. Bake in a traditional oven at 410F (210C). As soon as the sticks rise to touch the rack, remove the baking sheet from the oven, and bake at 340F (170C) in a fan-forced oven. Remove the wire rack to avoid marking the glaze. Finish baking. The glaze should be very shiny. Open the glazed pastry sticks and spread pastry cream inside. Re-assemble the pastry sticks. This recipe was originally published in "Alain Ducasses Desserts and Pastries" (ditions Alain Duca Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose/powder Glucose

Liquid Glucose/powder Glucose

I need to know ASAP the following please. I have a recipe that says 65mils liquid glucose BUT I can only buy the powder glucose. How much powder should I use. Also can some one tell me where to buy the liquid in the Katikati area Although I dont understand why, Ive been told that you cant substitute powder for syrup.However, Im not convinced so I'd try about 3- 1 part very hot water. i use powder for making glace peel etc without a hitch. Cake decorating shops/specialists usually carry liquid glucose. I use it in some icings to keep them shiny. Try your nearest New World - they seem to stock more gourmet products than the other supermarkets. That's where I've been buying it anyway, in the sugar aisle on the top shelf. Agree that you will be able to get from specialist cake decorating shops - and they'll probably post too. I buy mine a the local chemist shop it keeps for years in the fridge, I use it for the choclate bars in the AAW cook book You can also use corn syrup or sometimes golden syrup will work but that will depend very much on what it is you are making. Can you get to Tauranga to the New World there? Look where you buy the powdered glucose and there should be a jar of liquid glucose, the brand is called Queen, the lid is red and the label is blue... they should stock it.. The little 4 square shop in Katikati used to stock a liquid rice syrup made by Ceres. It is very sweet and is a wheat/gluten free alternative to glucose syrup which is often made from wheat.. You may be able to use that as a replacement. I haven't looked recently, but they used to stock it. The Woolworths in Katikati doesn't stock it or liquid glucose. Continue reading >>

Sosa Powdered Glucose (600g)

Sosa Powdered Glucose (600g)

Register for a Trade Account and save 20% - minimum order value applies - bona fide trade customers only. If you already have a Trade Account - log in before shopping to get your trade discount. Dehydrated glucose syrup. Unlike Sucrose, Powdered Glucose prevents crystalisation of sugars and prevents products & preparations from drying out. It also provides elasticity & keeps products soft. 75g of Powdered Glucose is equivalent to 100g Liqud Glucose. Use in sorbet, ganache, mousse, pastries, icing & candies. Q: Hi, just a question about your glucose pols. It is a 75gr of dry glucose equal 100gr of liquid one , but do I need to put mix it with water before using it ? 75gr is dry glucose without any water ?Thanks a lot Jc A: The proportion you mention is correct but you don't need to premix with water, you can add it as powder to your recipe. Delivery on UK orders just 3.65 including VAT (UK mainland orders shipped by First Class Post Recorded Delivery or DPD/Interlink) Telephone: From with the UK: 020 8450 1523 Continue reading >>

Recipe: Vanilla Ice Cream

Recipe: Vanilla Ice Cream

This is an all-time favourite of mine! My ice cream machine was definitely a good investment since it allows me to make a great dessert any time I want for a very cheap price! Home-made ice cream is so good I cant stop making it, especially in summer! This is my first ice cream recipe on this blog and I couldnt go more classic: vanilla ice cream. Making ice cream is not so different from making a flavoured custard sauce, but there are a few important ingredients and steps to remember: Powdered milk is fundamental to addcreaminess Glucose or dextrose is needed to prevent crystallisation (otherwise the ice cream will be good the same day, but will become too hard and icy in the following days) An ice cream stabiliser is recommendable to keep the final product creamy and soft The custard must be chilled quickly after cooking and needs to rest 24 hours in the fridge before churning. (Of course, without these special ingredients, you might achieve a pretty decent result anyway, but it will probably be waydifferentfrom artisan ice cream.) This recipe, inspired byPierre Herm,is very rich and creamy. If you want to follow hisdirections, let twovanilla beans steepin the milk for one day: as a result the ice cream has a fantastic and strong vanilla flavour (but for mere mortals like me, steeping the vanilla for 10 minutes gives an amazing result anyway). This is a basic recipe which is good for virtually any kind of ice cream: so unleash your creativity and add some chocolate, pistachio paste, praline paste, tea bags or any other flavour you want! And why not serving it with chocolate chips, cookie crumbs or meringues? Slurp! Continue reading >>

Pastry Chef Kriss Harvey On Perfecting Your Pacojet Technique

Pastry Chef Kriss Harvey On Perfecting Your Pacojet Technique

Technique: Making Perfect Ice Cream in a Pacojet Pastry Chef Kriss Harvey of Butter Chicago, IL The Pacojet is found in an increasing number of restaurant kitchens each year its versatile, powerful, and chefs tend to agree that it is unsurpassed in convenience. But all too often, chefs who use the Pacojet serve ice cream that doesnt hold in fact, this is the biggest complaint that we hear from those who dont like the machine: that something is lost in translation from convenience to plate, resulting in ice creams that melt significantly before they reach the table. As with everything in the kitchen, there are subtle tricks and nuances that can elevate a good product to the sublime and all it takes is a bit of knowledge to do so. Our palates tell us that Kriss Harvey is a master of ice cream, and so we listen when he credits the impeccable weight, texture, mouthfeel and hold of his product to first, the base, and second, his perfected Pacojet technique. Elementally speaking, ice cream is water and sugar wet and dry and you need a balance of ingredients for balanced results. For the dry components of a simple base, Harvey uses sugar, atomized glucose (glucose powder) and nonfat milk solids. For a base with added saturated fats (chocolate, nuts, etc), he uses sugar and Trimoline, which is more hygroscopic than sugar, less prone to crystallization, and has a high freeze-suppressant quality that softens the fats. Where the base is about quality, the machine is about quantity the trick to coaxing creamy ice cream from a Pacojet that doesnt melt too fast is simply filling the canister with exactly 1 pint of base (Harveys tip: freeze in a 1-pint deli cup), and running the ice cream 1 hours before service. 1 pint allows for the correct proportion of base to air, and running the Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose - The Answer To Perfect Ice-cream And More | Azelia's Kitchen

Liquid Glucose - The Answer To Perfect Ice-cream And More | Azelia's Kitchen

Liquid Glucose The Answer to Perfect Ice-Cream and More I think it was reading about Heston Blumenthal opening up a restaurant in London where his famous liquid nitrogen ice-cream will be served that jolted this quest of mine; how to make ice-cream at home that stays soft. After reading Kavey spost about an ice-cream shop in Camden Town, London, serving liquid nitrogen ice-cream, it seems theres a desire for supersoft textured ice-cream. Yes, liquid nitrogen makes super-duper soft ice-cream but whats the answer for the home cook? What about the rest of us? Go and purchase yourself a little bottle of liquid glucose, its adult and child-safeurmunless small child gets their little fingers into the sticky icky jar and runs fingers on your furniture! This post on liquid glucose is a follow up from Ice-Cream or Sorbet Too Firm in the Freezer? post where I searched into the problem of home ice-cream freezing too solid in the freezer and discovering the answer was liquid glucose, but I wanted to know more about the effect this inverted sugar has in ice-cream, why it helps to maintain it soft. Its sugar that has been boiled down with some water and a little acid until its thick and syrup like, it can take as little as 15 mins, at that point it becomes inverted sugar. What makes inverted sugar special is that once it gets to the broken-molecule down stage it cant go back to its former self, its molecules have been broken down to the extent they cant re-form and crystallise, it stays runny, thick and in syrup state. Think of any syrup like golden syrup by Tate & Lyle, molasses or corn syrup and thats what they are. It can be made from cane as golden syrup is, or potato, rice or wheat starch. In the US cornstarch seems the most popular choice. The other interesting thing about inv Continue reading >>

Using Dextrose (glucose) In Cooking And Baking

Using Dextrose (glucose) In Cooking And Baking

What is dextrose? Is it the same as glucose? What is it used for in baking? How is it different from regular sugar? How do I substitute dextrose for sugar in a recipe? Is glucose syrup the same as corn syrup? Where do I buy glucose / dextrose? This is your ultimate post on glucose / dextrose, read on to find out the answers to your questions What is dextrose (glucose)? Dextrose is a form of glucose. Dextrose = D-glucose, hence, the terms dextrose and glucose are used interchangeably. It’s also sometimes called corn sugar, grape sugar, crystaline glucose, wheat sugar, rice sugar or rice syrup. The full name is dextrose monohydrate and it is a simple sugar generated from the hydrolysis of starch, most commonly corn. The corn starch is treated with naturally occurring enzymes (they same as in our mouths) or acid. There is no way around the fact that this is a processed product, but at least it simulates natural occurrences (when we eat starch, it’s hydrolyzed by enzymes and broken down further by stomach acids to for example dextrose). Wait, hang on – I thought this was a sugar-free blog? I’m glad you asked. There are so many people, blogs, sites and books out there now with a “sugar-free” label. Despite that label, you may often find the following sugars in the recipes: Agave nectar, honey, brown rice syrup, glucose syrup, dextrose powder. Read about agave nectar here (to be honest, I fail to see this product as being healthy for anyone) and read about honey here (depends if you are overweight, diabetic or neither, but generally avoid it). When it comes to brown rice syrup (also known as rice malt syrup or rice syrup), glucose syrup (also know as liquid glucose) and dextrose powder, these are all broken down to 100% glucose in our bodies. Glucose can processed Continue reading >>

Gianduja Chocolate Fondant With Devonshire Ice Cream

Gianduja Chocolate Fondant With Devonshire Ice Cream

To make Devonshire ice cream. In a small saucepan with a candy thermometer clipped to the side, add the milk, milk powder, sugar, atomized glucose, and butter. Heat until the thermometer reaches 112 degrees F. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg yolks. Before adding the egg yolks to the milk mixture temper it by whisking some of the hot milk into the yolks, then add the yolk and milk mixture back into the milk. Cook on low heat, stirring in figure 8's with a spatula until slightly thickened, at 185 degrees F. Do not over cook, remove immediately from heat. Add the Devonshire cream, mix well and allow to cool before putting in the ice cream machine. Freeze according to manufacturer's instructions, allowing to reach soft to firm consistency. Serve immediately or place in freezer. To make the chocolate fondant. Butter a muffin tin. In a medium bowl, sift together the flour and salt. Over a double boiler on low heat, melt the butter and chocolate. Meanwhile in a standing mixer whip up the eggs, egg yolks and sugar on high until it reaches ribbon stage. Once at ribbon stage turn the mixer to low and add your melted chocolate and butter, combine well. Fold in the flour. Evenly divide the batter into muffin cups. Bake for 12 minutes, it should still be runny in the center. Serve immediately with the Devonshire ice cream on the side. This recipe was provided by a chef, restaurant or culinary professional. It has not been tested for home use. Recipe Courtesy of Pastry Chef Sebastian of the Ritz Carlton, Philadelphia, PA Continue reading >>

Powdered Glucose | 11 Lbs. Atomized Glucose Powder

Powdered Glucose | 11 Lbs. Atomized Glucose Powder

About Glucose Powder (Atomized) For Confectionary Use Used in ice creams, sorbets, fat fillings, soft biscuits, etc., Powdered Glucose is made of dehydrated glucose syrup. It provides the antifreezing property of sucrose with less sweetness. Atomized glucose powder has good dispensability, low freezing point depression, a neutral taste, and good solubility. Additionally, it has relatively low hygroscopicity, and a bodying effect. Storage: Dry and cool (68-72 F / 20-22 C) Availability: Usually ships within 1 business days. Product is non-perishable and can ship via Ground service. 0 out of 5 stars rating(0.00)# of Ratings: 0 Log in to rate this item. There are currently no ratings for this item. Be the first to rate this item. Q: What is the glucose powder made from, and how is it made? A: This glucose powder is made from dehydrated glucose derived from corn. Unfortunately, we are unable to find information on the manufacturing process. Q: Do you have the DE (Dextrose Equivalent) number for your Glucose Powder? A: Dextrose Equivalent (DE) is between 35-40. Continue reading >>

Substitutions - Is Dextrose The Same As Atomized Glucose Powder? - Seasoned Advice

Substitutions - Is Dextrose The Same As Atomized Glucose Powder? - Seasoned Advice

Is Dextrose the same as Atomized Glucose Powder? I have been making some yummy sorbets and ice creams. Many recipes call for atomized glucose powder. However, 'atomized glucose powder' is not that readily available. 'Dextrose', however, is commonly available at local heath food stores here in Southern California. There is some debate if dextrose is the same as atomized glucose. Specifically, look at this thread on eGullet where it is stated: Dextrose is a type of glucose but is sweeter. Atomized glucose has what is called a sweetness coefficent of 50 while dextrose has one of 75. 1. Wikipedia states: (Glucose (also known as D-glucose, dextrose, or grape sugar) is a simple monosaccharide found in plants. 2. Harold McGee in 'On Food and Cooking' states (p. 653 in the most recent edition): Glucose, also called dextrose, is a simple sugar, and the most common sugar from which living cells directly extract chemical energy. 3. The Culinary Institute of America's 'Mastering the Art of Craft of Baking and Pastry', 2nd edition states in the glossary (p. 914) Glucose: A monosaccaride that occurs naturally in fruits, some vegetables, and honey. Also known as dextrose. 4. Heston Blumenthal's 'The Fat Duck Cookbook' in the Science section (p. 456): Glucose: Arguably, glucose is the most important and widespread sugar molecule in biology. All glucose molecules come in two versions, a left-handed version called L-glucose and a right handed version called D-glucose. D-glucose is the only type produced by nature and the only type used in food. I am persnickety about using just the right ingredient. Is dextrose powder that you find at the health food store exactly the same as the expensive imported atomized glucose powders that need to be ordered from a specialty pastry supplier? Or is Continue reading >>

Glucose Vs. Dextrose

Glucose Vs. Dextrose

Fresh honey with honeycomb and fruitPhoto Credit: Zoonar/j.wnuk/Zoonar/Getty Images Jamie Yacoub is a clinical outpatient Registered Dietitian, expert in nutrition and author of her cookbook "Modern Guide to Food and Eating: Low Glycemic Recipes". She obtained a Bachelor of Science in clinical nutrition from UC Davis and an MPH in nutrition from Loma Linda University. Yacoub then completed her dietetic internship as an intern for a Certified Specialist in sports nutrition and at a top-100 hospital. Glucose and dextrose are both simple sugars or monosaccharides. The words "glucose" and "dextrose" are often used interchangeably. There is a difference between glucose and dextrose, however. Glucose is present in nature in two different molecular arrangements known as isomers. The isomers of glucose contain the same molecules, but they are in two different arrangements that mirror each other -- much like how your hands mirror each other. The two isomers of glucose are named L-glucose and D-glucose. Dextrose is D-glucose and may be referred to as dextrose or glucose because dextrose is actually a form of glucose. Dextrose or D-glucose is the form of glucose found naturally in foods such as fruit and honey. It is also derived from plants, like corn, for use as a sweetener in foods. According to the Sugar Association, dextrose is crystalline glucose, and a majority of dextrose in foods is derived from cornstarch. If dextrose has been added to a food, it may be listed on the ingredients list as "rice sugar," "wheat sugar" or "corn sugar," depending on the plant source. Manufacturers may also list added dextrose or glucose as "glucose," "dextrose" or other terms containing the word "glucose" or "dextrose." Dextrose is added to many foods including desserts like cake mixes, cooki Continue reading >>

Recipes - Acadmie Des Bocuses D'or

Recipes - Acadmie Des Bocuses D'or

Home page > Recipes >Granny Smith apples in vanilla jelly, puffed potatoes rolled in sugar Granny Smith apples in vanilla jelly, puffed potatoes rolled in sugar A recipe from YannickALLENO - Bocuse d'Argent1999 500 g finely diced Granny Smiths (5 apples) 500 g finely diced Golden Delicious (5 apples) Boil one third of the cream with the sugar and the scraped vanilla pods. Incorporate the soaked and squeezed out gelatine and then the rest of the cream. Pour 1.4 kg of this mixture into a 40 x 60 cm frame (lined with cling film to prevent leaks). Leave to set in the refrigerator. Cook the diced Golden Delicious in a vacuum pack with the scraped vanilla and a little ascorbic acid. Leave to cool and then mix with the diced Granny Smith. Sprinkle one kilo of the diced apple onto the sheet of vanilla panna cotta. Core the apples and cut them into quarters; cook them with the sugar, water and lemon grass cut into small sections. Blend in a food processor and then press through a fine sieve. Cut the potatoes into thin slices about 5 mm thick. Use a round cutter to make 4 cm diameter discs and place them in some absorbent kitchen paper for at least one hour. Make puffed potatoes by cooking the slices in oil at 140 C and then at 180 C. Roll in the sugar mixed with the cinnamon. Soak the gelatine, squeeze it out and then melt it in a little of the apple juice. Incorporate the rest of the ingredients. Pour 550 g of the apple jelly onto the sheet of vanilla panna cotta and diced apple. Set in the fridge and then place in the freezer. Gradually whip the whites with the caster sugar and then incorporate the icing sugar with a spatula. Spread a thickness of about one centimetre on several baking sheets, puff up in the oven at 130 C for twenty minutes and then dry out the meringue at 90 Continue reading >>

Sugar In Ice Cream

Sugar In Ice Cream

Ice cream generally contains seven categories of ingredients: fat (dairy or nondairy), milk solids-not-fat (MSNF) (the lactose, proteins, minerals, water-soluble vitamins, enzymes, and some minor constituents), sweeteners, stabilisers, emulsifiers, water, and flavours (Goff & Hartel, 2013). In this post, well be looking at the role of sweeteners in ice cream. 1. Which sweeteners are used in ice cream? Sweeteners used in ice cream include cane and beet sucrose (sugar), invert sugar,Corn Starch Hydrolysate Syrup (CSS), high maltose syrup, fructose or high fructose syrup, maltodextrin, dextrose, maple syrup or maple sugar, honey, brown sugar, and lactose. Because these sweeteners contribute metabolisable energy to the diet, they are callednutritive or caloric sweeteners.The most common choice of nutritive sweetener is a combination of sucrose (10-12%) and CSS (3-5%) (Goff & Hartel, 2013). Below is a table showing suggested mix compositions for ice cream, from Goff & Hartel (2013). The primary purposes for using sweeteners in ice cream are: to provide sweetness and enhance flavour; to develop smooth and creamy texture; to make ice cream softer and easier to scoop; and to contribute total solids. The main function of sweeteners is to increase the acceptance of ice cream by making it sweet and by enhancing the pleasing creamy flavour. Lack of sweetness produces a flat taste; too much tends to mask desirable flavours (Goff & Hartel, 2013). Sweeteners differ in their relative sweetness.Relative sweetness is a means of ranking sweeteners in comparison to one another. Sucrose is used as the standard and has a relative sweetness value of 100.Fructose, which has a relative sweetness value of 173, is the sweetest nutritive sweetener, whilst maltodextrins,having a relative sweetness Continue reading >>

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