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What Is Anhydrous Glucose?

What Is Dextrose?

What Is Dextrose?

Dextrose is the name of a simple sugar that is made from corn and is chemically identical to glucose, or blood sugar. Dextrose is often used in baking products as a sweetener, and can be commonly found in items such as processed foods and corn syrup. Dextrose also has medical purposes. It is dissolved in solutions that are given intravenously, which can be combined with other drugs, or used to increase a person’s blood sugar. Because dextrose is a “simple” sugar, the body can quickly use it for energy. Simple sugars can raise blood sugar levels very quickly, and they often lack nutritional value. Examples of other simple sugars include glucose, fructose, and galactose. Products that are typically made of simple sugars include refined sugar, white pasta, and honey. Dextrose is used to make several intravenous (IV) preparations or mixtures, which are available only at a hospital or medical facility. Dextrose is also available as an oral gel or in oral tablet form over the counter from pharmacies. Each dextrose concentration has its own unique uses. Higher concentrations are typically used as “rescue” doses when someone has a very low blood sugar reading. Dextrose is used in various concentrations for different purposes. For example, a doctor may prescribe dextrose in an IV solution when someone is dehydrated and has low blood sugar. Dextrose IV solutions can also be combined with many drugs, for IV administration. Dextrose is a carbohydrate, which is one part of nutrition in a normal diet. Solutions containing dextrose provide calories and may be given intravenously in combination with amino acids and fats. This is called total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and is used to provide nutrition to those who cannot absorb or get carbohydrates, amino acids, and fats throu Continue reading >>

Anhydrous Dextrose By Paulaur

Anhydrous Dextrose By Paulaur

Anhydrous dextrose, a special high purity product with moisture below 0.5%, is another of Paulaurs unique products. It is used in the making of special food preparations and is the best sweetener for water-sensitive systems such as chocolate. Anhydrous dextrose is not your common table sugar. It is crystallized D-glucose compounds. It has no water molecule in its chemical structure and is a monosaccharide, a simpler sugar than the fructose cane sugar. This means that it is a dry sugar. It is also referred to as powdered dextrose. Paulaur Corporation is a leading manufacturer and supplier of anhydrous dextrose Anhydrous dextrose is a simple carbohydrate that is directly absorbed into the blood. It has a glycemic index of 100%. It is a kind of dextrose that has no crystallised water molecules. It is a colorless, odorless white powder that is less sweeter than cane sugar; soluble in water and partially soluble in alcohol. Anhydrous dextrose has a wide spectrum of uses, in three major sectors: food, medical and industrial settings. Below is a break down of some of its uses: Anhydrous dextrose It is used in the production of cakes and cold drinks to improve their taste, flavor and luster. It is also used in the making of liquor additives, bakery, soft drinks, pudding, tins, dairy additives, coffee, coco products, ice cream, meat products, sausage, fish products, noodles, convenient food, chewing gum, and more. It is a very vital component of processed food. In the medical arena, anhydrous dextrose has a wide array of uses as well. It is used as a raw material in the manufacture of antibiotics, preparations of glucose injections, rehydration drip lines, and is even formulated with vitamins and minerals for use during convalescent periods of physical stress by patients, athle Continue reading >>

What Is Powdered Dextrose?

What Is Powdered Dextrose?

Jessica Jacobs is a registered dietitian and professional writer, contributing to "Fitness Magazine" since 2003. She received a B.A. in journalism from Arizona State University and an M.S. in nutrition and food sciences from the University of Texas at Austin. Spoon full of sugarPhoto Credit: Svetl/iStock/Getty Images Powdered dextrose, also known as icing dextrose, is a fine powder made from dextrose anhydrous, dextrose monohydrate or both. In most cases, manufacturers of powdered dextrose also add an anti-caking agent to the powder such as starch, silicates of calcium or magnesium. Powdered dextrose has several medical applications. Speak with a medical professional prior to consuming an powdered dextrose supplement. Dextrose Anhydrous and Dextrose Monohydrate Dextrose anhydrous and dextrose monohydrate are both purified and crystallized D-glucose compounds. The primary difference between these compounds is that the anhydrous form does not contain water and the monohydrate form contains one molecule of crystallized water. According to the book, A Manual of Sugar Analysis, Including the Applications in General of Analytical Methods to the Sugar Industry, both of these compounds contain approximately 99.5 percent D-glucose. Dextrose, like fructose and glucose, is a monosaccharide known as simple sugar. You can also combine these sugars to produce complex sugars such as sucrose, also known as table sugar. One of the primary differences between these simple sugars is the way your body metabolizes each of the sugars. Dextrose is a form of glucose manufacturers widely use in food products and athletes use to replenish the muscle glycogen levels. Manufacturers derive dextrose from corn. According to the book Dictionary of Food Ingredients, dextrose is approximately 20 percen Continue reading >>

D-glucose - Drugbank

D-glucose - Drugbank

Glucose is a simple sugar (monosaccharide) generated during phosynthesis involving water, carbon and sunlight in plants. It is produced in humans via hepatic gluconeogenesis and breakdown of polymeric glucose forms (glycogenolysis). It circulates in human circulation as blood glucose and acts as an essential energy source for many organisms through aerobic or anaerobic respiration and fermentation.[ 2 ] It is primarily stored as starch in plants and glycogen in animals to be used in various metabolic processes in the cellular level. Its aldohexose stereoisomer, dextrose or D-glucose, is the most commonly occurring isomer of glucose in nature. L-glucose is a synthesized enantiomer that is used as a low-calorie sweetener and laxative.[ 10 ] The unspecified form of glucose is commonly supplied as an injection for nutritional supplementation or metabolic disorders where glucose levels are improperly regulated.[ 12 ] Glucose is listed on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system. D-glucose (1.33 g) + Calcium Chloride (0.343 g) + Magnesium chloride (0.136 g) + Potassium Chloride (0.199 g) + Sodium Chloride (7.66 g) + Sodium bicarbonate (12.9 g) D-glucose (1.33 g) + Calcium Chloride (0.343 g) + Magnesium chloride (0.136 g) + Potassium Chloride (0.398 g) + Sodium Chloride (7.66 g) + Sodium bicarbonate (12.9 g) Dextrose monohydrate (1.65 g/67.5mL) + Citric Acid (493 mg/67.5mL) + Trisodium citrate dihydrate (1.48 g/67.5mL) Dextrose monohydrate (24.5 g/1000mL) + Citric Acid (7.3 g/1000mL) + Sodium Citrate (22 g/1000mL) Dextrose monohydrate (2.45 g/100mL) + Citric Acid (730 mg/100mL) + Sodium Citrate (2.2 g/100mL) ADSOL Red Cell Preservation Solution System in Plastic Container (PL 146 Plastic) Dextr Continue reading >>

Anhydrous Glucose - Finnish Translation Linguee

Anhydrous Glucose - Finnish Translation Linguee

Not more than 0,1 % (expressed as glucose on an anhydrous basis) Chlorides Enintn 0,1 % (laskettuna glukoosina vedettmst aineesta) Kloridit For products defined in Parts I.1, I.2, I.3, I.4 and I.5, in order to regulate acidic taste, the addition of lemon and/or lime juice and/or concentrated lemon and/or lime juice, up to 3 g per litre of juice, expressed as anhydrous citric acid is authorised. Edell I osan 1, 2, 3, 4 ja 5 kohdassa mriteltyihin tuotteisiin saa happoisuuden korjaamiseksi list sitruuna- ja/tai limettitysmehua ja/tai sitruuna- ja/tai limettitysmehutiivistett enintn 3 grammaa mehulitraa kohden vedettmn sitruunahappona ilmaistuna. Customs duties and charges having equivalent effect (including their agricultural component), which are applicable on the import into the European Union of products originating in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip and listed in chapters 1 to 24 of the Combined Nomenclature (CN) and of the customs tariff of the Palestinian Authority, and those listed in Annex 1(1)(ii) of the Agreement on Agriculture of the GATT, with exception of chemically pure lactose of CN code 1702 11 00 and of glucose and glucose syrup, containing in the dry state, 99% or more by weight of glucose of CN codes ex 1702 30 50 and ex 1702 30 90 covered by Chapter 1, shall be temporarily eliminated in accordance with the provisions of point B.5(a) of the Agreement in the form of Exchange of Letters. Euroopan unioniin tuotavilta Lnsirannalta ja Gazan alueelta perisin olevilta tuotteilta, jotka luetellaan yhdistetyn nimikkeistn (CN) ja palestiinalaishallinnon tullitariffin 124 ryhmss, ja tuotteilta, jotka luetellaan maataloutta koskevan GATT-sopimuksen liitteess 1 olevan 1 kohdan ii alakohdassa, lukuun ottamatta CNkoodiin 1702 11 00 kuuluvaa kemiallisesti puhdasta lak Continue reading >>

Types Of Sugar - Dextrose Glucose And High Fructose Corn Syrup Types Of Sugar

Types Of Sugar - Dextrose Glucose And High Fructose Corn Syrup Types Of Sugar

Thanks to alert reader Glen for pointing out that the FDA already has a regulation for Corn Sugar in the Code of Federal Regulations , under food substances Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS). CFR Section 184.1857 reads: (a) corn sugar (C6H12O6, CAS Reg. No. 50-99-7), commonly called D-glucose or dextrose, is the chemical [alpha]-D-glucopyranose. It occurs as the anhydrous or the monohydrate form and is produced by the complete hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids or enzymes, followed by refinement and crystallization from the resulting hydrolysate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 97-98 under the heading "Dextrose." (c) In accordance with 184.1(b)(1), the ingredient is used in food with no limitation other than current good manufacturing practice. The Corn Refiners have just petitioned the FDA to be allowed to use the name Corn Sugar to apply to both glucose/dextrose and High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) . But the existing definition seems to exclude HFCS. While HFCS is about half glucose, it is also about half fructose, and its manufacture from corn starch requires one more enzyme. Glucose is the sugar in blood, and dextrose is the name given to glucose produced from corn. Biochemically they are identical. Fructose is the principal sugar in fruit. In fruit, it raises no issues because it is accompanied by nutrients and fiber. Sucrose is table sugar. It is a double sugar, containing one part each of glucose (50%) and fructose (50%), chemically bound together. Enzymes in the intestine quickly and efficiently split sucrose into glucose and fructose, which are absorbed into the body as single sugars. HFCS is made from corn starch. It contains roughly equivalent amounts of glucose (45 to 58%) and Continue reading >>

Us4059460a - Solid Anhydrous Dextrose - Google Patents

Us4059460a - Solid Anhydrous Dextrose - Google Patents

US4059460A - Solid anhydrous dextrose - Google Patents US4059460A US05629739 US62973975A US4059460A US 4059460 A US4059460 A US 4059460A US 05629739 US05629739 US 05629739 US 62973975 A US62973975 A US 62973975A US 4059460 A US4059460 A US 4059460A Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.) Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.) Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.) C13KSACCHARIDES, OTHER THAN SUCROSE, OBTAINED FROM NATURAL SOURCES OR BY HYDROLYSIS OF NATURALLY OCCURRING DI-, OLIGO- OR POLYSACCHARIDES C13K1/00Glucose; Glucose-containing syrups Non-compacting, anhydrous dextrose conversion syrup product in particle form prepared by shearing and cooling a molten dextrose conversion syrup (preferably at 90-92% dry solids) to a temperature less than 200 F., depositing and solidifying the fluid mass upon a supporting member to an anhydrous dextrose product, granulating the solidified product and drying the particles to less than 2% moisture. The anhydrous dextrose particles have unique properties and, if desired, may be used as a sugar or dextrose monohydrate replacement. Solid dextrose is conventionally manufactured by crystallizing supersaturated, high dextrose syrups and recovering the crystals therefrom in -D-dextrose monohydrate crystal form (e.g., see U.S. Pat. No. 3,039,935). Yields depend upon carefully controlled cooling temperatures and

Roquette Anhydrous Dextrose

Roquette Anhydrous Dextrose

Roquette Anhydrous Dextrose is a natural sugar, when in its crystalline form, can be used as a sweetener and texturizer. Dextrose is the monomer of the starch chain (polymers), and is the sugar naturally present in the human body. This product is often used in chocolate, biscuits, pastries, ice cream, etc. Roquette is a leading producer of starch ingredients used in the Food, Beverage, and Nutrition industry. With an array of wheat, corn, potato, and pea starches and starch derivatives, its lineup of high quality ingredients deliver solutions for various product needs such as acidity regulation, anticrystallisation, binding, calorie and fat reduction, colouring, emulsification, and fibre enrichment. Roquette America, Inc. makes their documentation available in the regions indicated below: The information presented here was acquired by UL from the producer of the product or material or original information provider. However, UL assumes no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of the information contained on this website and strongly encourages that upon final product or material selection information is validated with the manufacturer. This website provides links to other websites owned by third parties. The content of such third party sites is not within our control, and we cannot and will not take responsibility for the information or content. Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test For Primary Care

Glucose Tolerance Test For Primary Care

Uncontrolled when printed CHISCP49: Glucose Tolerance Test for Primary Care, Revision No 1 Expiry Date: 30 th November 2018 Authors: Biochemistry Standard Clinical Guideline Group Authorised by Julia Forsyth Page 1 of 4 Southern Derbyshire Shared Care Pathology Guidelines The diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus should not be made on the basis of a single raised plasma glucose in the absence of symptoms. In 2011 WHO recommended the use of HbA1c as a test to diagnose (rather than just monitor) diabetes. This offers an alternative to the oral glucose tolerance test (GTT) that eliminates the need for patients to fast and wait for 2 hours for the test to be completed. However, HbA1c is contraindicated for diagnosis of diabetes in some situations – please see the Southern Derbyshire Shared Care Pathology guideline ‘Diagnosis of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus using HbA1c’ at All glucose values in this document refer to venous plasma glucose levels. Glucose results obtained from “near patient†testing strips should not be used in the diagnosis of DM. INDICATIONS A GTT is indicated if HbA1c is contraindicated and: a) there is impaired fasting glycaemia, (fasting plasma glucose >6.0 mmol/L, but <7.0 mmol/L) b) previous history of gestational diabetes c) there is a possible low renal threshold for glucose i.e. glycosuria and random glucose <11.1 mmol/L. CONTRAINDICATIONS None SIDE EFFECTS Occasionally nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea as the glucose drink is hyperosmolar. PREPARATION The procedure can be carried out in the Phlebotomy Department at the LRCH or RDH. No appointment is necessary but the patient should come between 08:45 and 09:30. The test can also be carried out by appointment only at the phlebotomy clinics at Ripley Hospital and Babington Hospital. So Continue reading >>

What Are Maltodextrin & Dextrose & Are They Safe?

What Are Maltodextrin & Dextrose & Are They Safe?

What Are Maltodextrin & Dextrose & Are They Safe? Andrea Cespedes is a professionally trained chef who has focused studies in nutrition. With more than 20 years of experience in the fitness industry, she coaches cycling and running and teaches Pilates and yoga. She is an American Council on Exercise-certified personal trainer, RYT-200 and has degrees from Princeton and Columbia University. Processed cereal bars on a table.Photo Credit: draganadutina/iStock/Getty Images Food labels often offer up a sea of unpronouncable words. Maltodextrin and dextrose are two that may give you pause, but both are ingredients derived from natural sources, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration categorizes them as "generally recognized as safe," or GRAS. These additives are present in numerous processed foods to provide texture and sweetness. You might find the ingredient maltodextrin on the labels of cereal bars, granola, chips and other snack foods. It's a simple starch that's easily digested and acts as a filler or texture enhancer. Manufacturers usually create it from corn, rice or potato starch and add enzymes to break it down until it forms a white powder. In countries other than the United States and Canada, wheat or barley starch may be used to create maltodextrin. Dextrose is the simple sugar that gives fruit and honey a sweet taste. It's a primary ingredient in corn syrup and is often added to processed baked goods as well as cake mixes, frostings, sweet and savory snack foods, and custard and sherbet desserts. Manufacturers also use it as a filler in artificial sweeteners. Dextrose browns well, so it improves the appearance of baked goods' crusts. It's usually derived from cornstarch. You may see it as "dextrose anhydrous or anhydrous dextrose on a food label. Dextrose is a Continue reading >>

Glucose Anhydrous - Uses, Benefits, And Working

Glucose Anhydrous - Uses, Benefits, And Working

Glucose Anhydrous - Uses, Benefits, and Working Glucose Anhydrous is a medicine that is used for the treatment of Hypoglycemia , Increases production of urine and other conditions. The complete list of uses and indications for Glucose Anhydrous is as follows: The following are the results of on-going survey on TabletWise.com for Glucose Anhydrous. These results only indicate the perceptions of the website users. Please base your medical decisions only on the advice of a doctor or a registered medical professional. No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey No data has been collected for this survey Glucose Anhydrous Working, Mechanism of Action and Pharmacology Glucose Anhydrous improves the patient's condition by performing the following functions: DailyMed DEXTROSE MONOHYDRATE - dextrose monohydrate injection - Accessed: October 12, 2016. This page provides information for Glucose Anhydrous Uses, Benefits, and Working in English. Copyright 2018 TabletTree. Trademarks & Tradenames used herein are the property of their respective holders. The content provided on this is for educational purposes only. It is not to be used for medical diagnosis, medical advice or treatment. While every effort is made to maintain correctness of content, no guarantee is made to that Continue reading >>

Dextrose Anhydrous | Natural Sugar | Sweetener And Texturizer | Roquette

Dextrose Anhydrous | Natural Sugar | Sweetener And Texturizer | Roquette

Dextrose Anhydrous | Natural sugar | Sweetener and texturizer Dextrose anhydrousis a natural sugar. This glucose is used as a sweetener for chocolate powder drink, a texturizer, a bulking agent and an energy source. Glucose or dextrose is the monomer of the starch chain (polymers). Glucose is also the sugar naturally present in the human body. In its crystalline form this natural sugar has long been used as a sweetener and texturizer. The Roquette dextrose range is large enough to satisfy every manufacturer request. Dextrose anhydrous is a purified D-Glucose not containing crystallization water. Dextrose anhydrous is a white crystalline powder with a neutral odour and sweet taste. Directive 2001/111/EC (JOCE L-10 of January 12 2002) US Code of federal regulations - 21 CFR 168.110 Registrations vary depending on local regulations. Dextrose anhydrous CG - coarse crytalline grade Dextrose anhydrous CF - fine crystalline grade Sweetener (chocolate spreads, biscuits, pastries, powdered drinks, etc.) Energy source (beverages, confectionery, etc.) Bulking agent (chocolate, drinks, powder mixes, etc.) Some examples of recipes developed by Roquette around this ingredient which have inspired fruitful developments on the market: Continue reading >>

Applications And Uses Of Dextrose Anhydrous

Applications And Uses Of Dextrose Anhydrous

Hot Search: Aspartame, Acesulfame K, Sucralose, Sodium Saccharin Xylitol, Nisin, Natamycin, D Biotin, Potassium Sorbate, CMC, Xanthan Gum Applications and Uses of Dextrose Anhydrous Dextrose Anhydrouscan be used in Food,Beverage,Pharmaceutical,Health & Personal care products,Agriculture/Animal Feed/Poultry. Dextrose Anhydrous is used as sweetener inBaked GoodsCandy and GumCreams and Frozen, DairyJarred/Canned Foods.Dextrose Anhydrous is a common form of glucose. Dextrose Anhydrous can be used as nutritional supplement and sweetener in food production such as in baked goods, candy and gum, creams and frozen dairy products (like some ice-creams and frozen yogurts), jarred and canned foods, cured meats. The sweet taste of Dextrose Anhydrouse is 60% 70% of sucroses. It it same as Dextrose Monohydrate, can be used in confection, cakes, beverages, biscuits, jam, jelly, and honey products for better taste, quality; it can widely used in beverages and cold food into the solution, it can keep soft and taste and extend shelf life.It is widely used in high quality products in market. Dextrose Anhydrous can be used in beverage such as in energy drink,Beer/Alcoholic Beveragesused in low calorie beer products as the fermentable carbohydrate source to reduce calories. Dextrose Anhydrous for oral ingestion may be used in treatment of various diseases and nutrient enhancers. Glucuronic acid may combine with toxic substances such as alcohol and phenol in liver to form non-toxic compounds to discharge them out of human body along with urine, thus achieving detoxification. In veterinary industry, glucose may be directly used as drinking agent or applied in various animal drugs as a carrier. As It is Pyrogens free, it is widely used in human and animals infusion and injection in hospital. Continue reading >>

Glucose

Glucose

This article is about the naturally occurring D-form of glucose. For the L-form, see L-Glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar with the molecular formula C6H12O6, which means that it is a molecule that is made of six carbon atoms, twelve hydrogen atoms, and six oxygen atoms. Glucose circulates in the blood of animals as blood sugar. It is made during photosynthesis from water and carbon dioxide, using energy from sunlight. It is the most important source of energy for cellular respiration. Glucose is stored as a polymer, in plants as starch and in animals as glycogen. With six carbon atoms, it is classed as a hexose, a subcategory of the monosaccharides. D-Glucose is one of the sixteen aldohexose stereoisomers. The D-isomer, D-glucose, also known as dextrose, occurs widely in nature, but the L-isomer, L-glucose, does not. Glucose can be obtained by hydrolysis of carbohydrates such as milk sugar (lactose), cane sugar (sucrose), maltose, cellulose, glycogen, etc. It is commonly commercially manufactured from cornstarch by hydrolysis via pressurized steaming at controlled pH in a jet followed by further enzymatic depolymerization.[3] In 1747, Andreas Marggraf was the first to isolate glucose.[4] Glucose is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[5] The name glucose derives through the French from the Greek γλυκός, which means "sweet," in reference to must, the sweet, first press of grapes in the making of wine.[6][7] The suffix "-ose" is a chemical classifier, denoting a carbohydrate. Function in biology[edit] Glucose is the most widely used aldohexose in living organisms. One possible explanation for this is that glucose has a lower tendency than other aldohexoses to react nonspecific Continue reading >>

Determining The Physical Stability And Watersolid Interactions Responsible For Caking During Storage Of Alpha-anhydrous Glucose

Determining The Physical Stability And Watersolid Interactions Responsible For Caking During Storage Of Alpha-anhydrous Glucose

, Volume 8, Issue4 , pp 326335 | Cite as Determining the physical stability and watersolid interactions responsible for caking during storage of alpha-anhydrous glucose Typically, a crystalline powder is considered reasonably stable below it deliquescence point (RH0), however, caking has been reported for some materials below their RH0. The critical relative humidity (RH) values for caking and hydrate formation in alpha-anhydrous glucose (-AG) and -AG partitioned into three particle sizes were assessed using saturated salt slurries ranging from 0 to 84% RH at 25C for 20weeks. The degree of caking was determined by a five-point visual physical stability scale, from free flowing with minimal clumping (1) to fully caked (5), and X-ray powder diffraction was used to determine the composition of the samples. Caking was observed in -AG during storage at 68% RH at 25C and the severity of caking increased with increasing RH. Fine particle -AG caked during storage at 64% RH, whereas medium and large particle -AG caked at 68 and 75% RH, respectively, at 25C. Caking was observed in the absence of deliquescence, amorphous content, and hydrate formation; therefore, it is proposed that capillary condensation leads to caking in -AG below its RH0. Capillary condensation caking occurs at a specific RH (termed RHcc) where direct condensation of moisture into confined spaces, such as particle contact points or surface defects, causes the formation of liquid bridges, which may solidify over time without changes in RH or temperature. To avoid caking, -AG should be stored below its RHcc, which is highly dependent on particle size; and to avoid conversion to glucose monohydrate, -AG, regardless of particle size, should be stored below 64% RH at 25C. Hydrate formationAnhydrous glucoseCakingCa Continue reading >>

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