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What Is A Good Snack For A Diabetic To Eat Before Bed?

Before Bed Snack Ideas?

Before Bed Snack Ideas?

Like so many of us I am struggling with my fasting numbers. I'm curious what snacks you all eat before bed. Also, what time do you eat to have the best numbers? My favorite go to snack is a string cheese and a slice of whole wheat toast with pb, also have done a greek yogurt with almods..i eat between 9-10pm and test between 530-630 am I do a bowl of full fat vanilla ice cream with walnuts or peanut butter. I had read the fat helps slow the sugar processing. I don't know if that's true but my fasting has been in the 70's when I eat this snack. My dr said its okay to do the flavored kinds of greek as long as it fits into my snack allowances for carbs and protien..i buy the light and fit brand (the coconut and peach flavors are amazing) or the yoplait greek light..read a few different lables i am sure you will find one that works! I've seen other women recommend ice cream but have been nervous to try it. It sounds fabulous to have at night but worried what the extra sugar will do to me. Do you ever have high fasting numbers or are you well controlled with diet? I was getting high fasting numbers when I was eating other things like graham crackers or a protein bar. Since I do the ice cream with protein, I usually have numbers between 75 and 89. I have also checked at the hour mark to see if it spiked and it was 110. So I figure it's not doing anything too drastic. I am ten days from my c section and am strictly diet controlled, so I'm hoping it's working. Baby is measuring normal to small not large at all and Drs r not worried either. U can always try it, eat the ice cream-check your one hour level and see how the fasting goes. If it doesn't work, one high number is ok and u would know to stay away. I eat any full fat vanilla...no low carb or light. I'm allowed 30 carbs a Continue reading >>

The Downside Of Late-night Eating

The Downside Of Late-night Eating

If you’re a night owl, you might be interested to know that your late-night eating habits could impact your health — and not in a good way. Pretty much everyone at one point or another has had a late dinner or indulged in some snacking while watching television or catching up on the day’s work. Some people don’t sleep well at night and may turn to food to try to help them catch some shut-eye. While staying up until the wee hours and noshing may be a routine for you, it might be time to take a second look at these habits that perhaps aren’t so healthy. Eating late at night: Can affect your weight. Contrary to popular belief, eating late at night doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll gain weight. What dictates weight gain is how many calories you consume over the course of the entire day, not necessarily when you consume those calories. However, you could end up gaining weight based on the types of foods you may be reaching for as you catch up on Game of Thrones. Potato chips, cheese and crackers, ice cream, cookies… all of these are calorie-laden treats that are surefire ways to pack on the pounds compared to snacks that you might choose during the day: fruit, yogurt, nuts, etc. In addition, it’s easy to go overboard with food portions at night, especially when you get caught up in television or work. Mindless eating kicks in and before you know it, you’ve polished off that bag of Doritos. Can impact your blood sugars. What and how much you eat can directly affect your blood sugars both overnight and the next morning, especially if your snack choices are mostly carbohydrate foods, like crackers, chips, or fruit. Your diabetes medicine may not completely “cover” excessive eating at night and you may be unpleasantly surprised the next morning when yo Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Snack Before Bed

Type 2 Diabetes Snack Before Bed

If you have type-2 diabetes, eating right is very important to help manage the disease. But this doesnt mean that you also need to stop eating snacks. Even snacking between meals or before bed is often recommended when you take insulin treatment. Just make sure that your choice is healthy and has least effect on blood sugar. Its very important for diabetics to manage their blood sugar as well. As long as they can keep it normal, there is nothing to worry. On the other hand, poorly-controlled high blood sugar is to blame for the diabetic complications to occur! Diabetes can be dangerous when it has caused its complications which some are life-threatening. The complications include cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, neuropathy (nerve damage), eye problems (blindness in worst scenario), kidney disease, and diabetic ketoacidosis. If you have diabetes, your diet is the core of treatment plan to cope with the disease. What you eat can affect your blood sugar. Therefore, eating right is important step for managing the disease. How about snacks? When it comes to snacking, what most people think are usually foods high in fats, carbohydrates, calories, or even sugars. But there lots of other options which some are healthy and safe for your blood sugar. Eating snack is not off-limits if youre a diabetic. Even there a number of benefits from eating snack for diabetics. If it is healthy or part of your meal plan made by your dietitian, it does help manage your blood sugar as well as avoid binge at mealtime. For many people with diabetes, snacks do help manage the disease and curb their hunger. There are lots of healthy snacks to choose from. But for diabetes, just remember the following key points: First, you need to know which a good and safe snack for your diabetes! The kind Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, you’ll find many healthy ideas below. What is a healthy snack? Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canada’s Food Guide. The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Here’s a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate-rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats, barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Mid-day snacks Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL (¾ cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL (½ cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus On-the-go snacks These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 2 whole grain rye crispbread crackers 1 single-s Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

20 Diabetes-Friendly Snack Ideas Whether you want to lose weight or simply eat healthier, enjoying a couple of snacks each day is a smart habit for many people. Eating a planned snack between meals can help curb your hunger (and therefore prevent overeating at mealtime) and also increase your energy levels when you need a boost. Snacks offer an additional benefit for people with type 2 diabetes: They can help optimize your blood glucose control. So if you haven't incorporated snacks into your diabetes meal plan yet, now may be the time to start. Here's what you need to know to snack smart, along with some carbohydrate-controlled snack ideas you can try today! 3 Considerations When Planning Snacks The number of snacks a person with diabetes should eat during the day depends largely on your eating preferences, your weight-management goals, and the timing of your major meals. People with diabetes can eat snacks throughout the day for a number of reasons—simply enjoying a mid-morning snack or planning them into their day for better blood glucose control. Exactly how many snacks you should eat—and when you eat them—is very individualized. Meeting with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator is the best way to make sure your diabetes meal plan meets your needs. However, here are a few basic guidelines that can be helpful when planning snacks. How many hours pass between your meals? In general, people with diabetes who want to optimize blood glucose control should not go longer than five hours without eating. If you consistently eat your main meals every 4 to 5 hours, then you may not need any snacks between meals. However, if your main meals are generally spaced out at longer intervals, snacking between meals can help you achieve your best blood glucose co Continue reading >>

5 Foods You Should Never Eat Just Before Going To Bed

5 Foods You Should Never Eat Just Before Going To Bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed. “Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating. “Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.” But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed. “I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.” If eating befo Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Snacking Options

Diabetes-friendly Snacking Options

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 12 No. 9 P. 12 Grabbing a quick bite between meals isn’t off-limits for people with diabetes. “Snacking can really contribute to a healthy diet. It ensures that our body gets the fuel that it needs regularly throughout the day—and that’s true for everybody, diabetes or not,” says Beverley Manganelli, RD, BS, CDE, manager of community nutrition services at Hunterdon Medical Center in Flemington, N.J. “What’s different for someone with diabetes is, obviously, what kind of medications they’re on and their blood sugar control. Snacking can definitely impact that, so you need to pay a little more attention to the things that you choose. Although there are no ‘never’ foods, you do want to get a nutritious bang for your buck.” Because carbohydrate is the nutrient that impacts blood sugar the most, monitoring intake is crucial. “Generally, snacks can be between 15 and 30 g [of carbohydrate], but that’s based on individual needs and what that patient works out with their registered dietitian,” says Manganelli. Caloric intake needs to be addressed as well, especially since many people with type 2 diabetes need to lose weight. However, a patient already at a good weight who works at an active job may need more carbohydrates. Older patients with long-standing diabetes often struggle with the idea that they can work sugar into their food plan. “They’re used to the old way of thinking,” says Lindsay Fortman, RD, CDE, of Memorial Healthcare’s Diabetes & Outpatient Nutrition Counseling Center in Owosso, Mich. “But with being allowed to eat anything—it’s portion size that matters—we are seeing better compliance.” Time It Right Grazing throughout the day, however, may negatively impact blood sugar. Constantly taking i Continue reading >>

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

1 / 7 Midnight Snacking Isn't Off Limits If You Have Diabetes Midnight snacking doesn’t typically have the healthiest connotations. But being hungry late at night doesn’t mean you have to derail your diabetes diet by standing in front of the refrigerator spooning ice cream out of the tub, as delicious as that may sound. In fact, satisfying a late-night craving with a healthy snack may be good for diabetes. That’s because fasting for too long can, in some cases, make the liver overproduce glucose, which can raise blood sugar — an effect that can be harmful for people with type 2 diabetes, says Lori Chong, RDN, CDE, at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. Next time you have a hankering for something salty, savory, or sweet, get your hands on one of these diabetes-friendly snacks to ward off hunger and help you get back to sleep. Continue reading >>

Nighttime Snack- A Blood Sugar Must

Nighttime Snack- A Blood Sugar Must

Over and over again, I have heard people say “Don’t eat after 8pm, its bad for your health” with no evidence to back up this supposed claim. Your body will not magically turn all calories into fat if you eat a piece of fruit, a cracker or even your dinner the second the clock strikes 8pm, but for those with type 2 diabetes, not eating a nighttime snack may actually be contributing to high blood sugars in the morning. Medications for diabetes-especially insulin – work by helping glucose enter the cells and lowering blood sugar values. This medication is adjusted specifically for each individual in order to make sure that blood sugars don’t stay too high or drop too low. However, insulin may act in your body for an extended period of time, depending on the type. During the day, we are constantly providing our body with sources of carbohydrates either by eating three distinct meals every several hours or grazing throughout the day. For those who choose not to eat anything between dinner and breakfast the next morning, this provides a window of potentially twelve hours with no carbohydrates entering the bloodstream. As mentioned before, insulin often works over an extended period of time, and may still be helping lower your blood sugar at night when you are sleeping and will cause a low blood sugar at night. You might be wondering how this will lead to high blood sugars in the morning right about now. Our bodies have a unique system of storing some extra glucose in our liver, and these stores are called glycogen. When we eat foods that are turned into glucose as they are digested, a limited amount of this glucose is stored in the liver for emergency purposes in case we need a boost of energy to run away from a bear that is about to eat us. For the average American Continue reading >>

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Low blood sugar during the night can be a concern for people with diabetes, especially those on insulin. A 2003 study published in "Diabetes Care" investigated the impact of snack composition on nightly blood sugars in adults with Type 1 diabetes. The researchers concluded that bedtime snacks consisting of a carbohydrate and protein worked best in preventing low blood sugars when the bedtime blood sugar was less than 126 mg/dL. Video of the Day Most bedtime snacks contain about 15 to 30 g of carbohydrate, or two servings of a carbohydrate-containing food, and a serving of protein. It is not quite understood why protein helps to prevent nightly hypoglycemia, according to the authors of the "Diabetes Care" study, but it is believed to be related to the way protein is metabolized. Cereal and milk provides both carbohydrate and protein. A good bedtime snack consists of 3/4-cup serving of whole-grain cereal and 1-cup of low-fat milk. During cold months, you can try 1/2 cup of hot cereal with 2 tbsp. of raisins and 1 cup of skim milk as a cereal bedtime snack. Crackers and Peanut Butter Crackers provide the carbohydrate and peanut butter provides the protein. Spread 12 whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter or you can also try six whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter and 1-cup of skim milk. Each of these snacks contain 30 g of carbohydrate. Sandwiches also make a good bedtime snack for diabetics. Choose lean sources of meat to decrease your intake of saturated fat. Too much saturated fat in the diet increases blood cholesterol levels, another risk factor for heart disease. Bedtime sandwich ideas include two slices of whole wheat bread with 1 oz. of turkey, 1 oz. of lean ham, 1oz. of low-fat cheese or 1 oz. of canned tuna packed in water mixed with 1 ts Continue reading >>

How To Snack In The Right Way If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

How To Snack In The Right Way If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

If it fits your meal plan, yogurt with fruit can be a good snack.Getty Images If you have type 2 diabetes, you don't need to include snacks in your daily diet, unless you're on a type of medication, such as insulin or sulfonylureas, that can cause hypoglycemia. However, snacksif they are healthy and part of the meal plan developed by your diabetes educator or dietitiancan help prevent blood glucose peaks and valleys, as well as overeating at mealtime. The trick is knowing which foods make a "good" snack, the right portion size, and how often you should eat between meals. Calculate snack carbohydrates and calories A good snack consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on the individual's meal plan and medication), according to Rosalia Doyle, RD, a nutritionist at the Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. Just like meals, snacks should aim for a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates (read the food label to get all the details). "At our clinic, every type 2 diabetic gets an individual meal plan when they see one of the registered dietitians. And snacking is important for some people because it helps to prevent the blood sugar from fluctuating," says Doyle. Doyle likes to incorporate snacks her clients enjoy, like yogurt with fruit, popcorn without butter, and berries. Despite the nutritional value of such snacks, this eating must also be monitored. Inappropriate snacking can contribute to obesity. One way to avoid harmful snacking is to understand portion sizes for both your snacks and meals, and to stick to the parameters. "Three cups of popcorn is the same serving as one slice of bread, and a great snack," says Doyle. Other snack ideas include high fiber cereal with soy milk, a Continue reading >>

6 Smart Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics

6 Smart Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics

Many people with diabetes deliberately nosh at night to keep glucose levels from plummeting while they sleep. A snack before bed isn’t a bad impulse, says Fran Cogen, M.D., director of the childhood and adolescent diabetes program at Children’s National Health System. But the wrong kind of snack can actually make things worse. Instead of high-carb fare like chips, “aim for a bedtime snack of protein plus carbohydrate,” she says. Also keep in mind that blood sugar levels are highly individual and will vary based on how active you are each day. So before you hit the kitchen, it’s best to test your glucose level. The Best Bedtime Snacks 10 Goldfish crackers + 1/2 cup skim milk String cheese + whole-grain crackers Apple slices + peanut butter 1 slice whole wheat bread + 2 oz turkey Hummus + raw veggies 1/4 cup cottage cheese + 1/2 cup berries Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

Does Everyone With Diabetes Need A Bedtime Snack?

Does Everyone With Diabetes Need A Bedtime Snack?

Are you one of those people who get a craving for ice cream right around 10 pm? Or maybe you like to munch on potato chips when watching late night TV? Snacking before bedtime can be a guilty pleasure, but people with diabetes are often told to include it in their meal plans. Is this something that every person with diabetes really needs? Diabetes Meal Planning has Changed In the past, people who were diagnosed with diabetes were often given vague directions about meal planning, with little attention paid to their personal goals. Most people were told to have 3 meals and 3 snacks per day, without much guidance on exactly what and when to eat. Times have changed, and thankfully so have diabetes meal-planning guidelines. Nowadays, meal plans are much more flexible and individualized. Similarly, the decision to include a bedtime snack in your diet depends on many things – blood sugar levels, weight management goals, and your eating schedule. Blood sugar levels at bedtime are particularly important to look at. A study in the Journal of Diabetes Care recommends having a snack if your blood sugar is less than 126 mg/dl, but to avoid snacking if your blood sugar is higher than 180 mg/dl. Why is Snacking Important for People with Diabetes? Some people with diabetes may develop what’s called nocturnal hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) while they sleep. If your blood sugar at bedtime is low – i.e., less than 126 mg/dl ? then a snack can help to prevent this nighttime dip. But be wise about your snack selection: this isn’t a green light to eat just anything. It’s important to choose a snack that is low in calories, as well as a healthy source of carbohydrate and protein. Best Bedtime Snacks A general rule of thumb is 15-30 grams of carbs and about an ounce (7 grams) of prot Continue reading >>

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