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What Is A Glucose Tablet Used For?

Hypoglycemia Treatment

Hypoglycemia Treatment

Your treatment plan for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) depends on what is causing your blood sugar level to drop too low. As you can learn in the causes article, hypoglycemia causes fall into two categories: low blood glucose caused by diabetes and low blood glucose not caused by diabetes. Diabetes-related Hypoglycemia If your hypoglycemia is caused by certain medications used for diabetes (people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes can become hypoglycemic), your healthcare professional may suggest several things to help you treat hypoglycemia when it happens. He or she may also suggest adjustments in your diabetes treatment plan to help you prevent hypoglycemia. The doctor may suggest: Medication (e.g., insulin certain oral medications) dose adjustment: This may also include changing when you take your medication. Working with a dietitian to develop or adjust your meal plan: A dietitian can help you figure out a good meal plan—for example, one that maintains consistency in carbohydrates at meals. A dietitian can also help you learn how to count grams of carbohydrates so that you can better plan your medication and/or insulin. Increase (or more closely follow) self-monitoring of blood glucose levels: Knowing your blood glucose level throughout the day—when you get up, before meals, after meals, etc.—can help you avoid going low. Limit consumption of alcoholic beverages: Alcohol can affect the way your body metabolizes glucose, so if you're already prone to hypoglycemia, you should cut back on how much alcohol you drink. Carry glucose tablets (dextrose) or hard candy: With your healthcare professional's recommendation, make sure you always have glucose tablets or hard candy with you. You can stick them in your briefcase, purse, car, at your desk, school locker, e Continue reading >>

Using Glucose Tablets

Using Glucose Tablets

If you experience any of the symptoms of hypoglycemia detailed earlier—especially hunger—measure blood sugar. If blood sugar is 10 mg/dl or more below target, chew enough glucose tablets to bring blood sugar back to your target. If you have no symptoms but discover a low blood sugar upon routine testing, again, take enough glucose or nizagara tablets to bring blood sugar back to your target. Having no symptoms is not a valid reason for not taking tablets. A low blood sugar without symptoms carries more risk than one with symptoms. If you weigh about 140 pounds and your blood sugar is 60 mg/dl but your target is 90 mg/dl, then you might eat 4 Dextrotabs. This would raise your blood sugar, according to Table 20-2, by 32 mg/dl, bringing you to 92 mg/dl. If you are using Dextro-Energen, you’d take 1. tablets.With B-D tablets, you’d take 1. Simple. If your low blood sugar resulted from taking too much insulin or OHA, it may continue to drop after taking glucose if the insulin or OHA hasn’t finished working. You should therefore recheck your blood sugar about 45 minutes after taking the tablets, to rule out this possibility and to see if you’re back where you belong. If blood sugar is still low, take additional tablets. If you have delayed stomach-emptying, you may have to wait as much as 2 or more hours for full effect.* What if you’re out of your home or workplace and don’t have your blood sugar meter? (A major crime, as noted earlier.) If you think you’re hypoglycemic, play it safe and take enough tablets to raise your blood sugar about 60 mg/dl (7 Dextrotabs, for example, or 2 B-D tablets) You may worry that this will bring you too high. If you take insulin, this poses no problem. Simply check your blood sugar when you get back to your meter. If it ’s Continue reading >>

What Is Dextrose?

What Is Dextrose?

Dextrose is the name of a simple sugar that is made from corn and is chemically identical to glucose, or blood sugar. Dextrose is often used in baking products as a sweetener, and can be commonly found in items such as processed foods and corn syrup. Dextrose also has medical purposes. It is dissolved in solutions that are given intravenously, which can be combined with other drugs, or used to increase a person’s blood sugar. Because dextrose is a “simple” sugar, the body can quickly use it for energy. Simple sugars can raise blood sugar levels very quickly, and they often lack nutritional value. Examples of other simple sugars include glucose, fructose, and galactose. Products that are typically made of simple sugars include refined sugar, white pasta, and honey. Dextrose is used to make several intravenous (IV) preparations or mixtures, which are available only at a hospital or medical facility. Dextrose is also available as an oral gel or in oral tablet form over the counter from pharmacies. Each dextrose concentration has its own unique uses. Higher concentrations are typically used as “rescue” doses when someone has a very low blood sugar reading. Dextrose is used in various concentrations for different purposes. For example, a doctor may prescribe dextrose in an IV solution when someone is dehydrated and has low blood sugar. Dextrose IV solutions can also be combined with many drugs, for IV administration. Dextrose is a carbohydrate, which is one part of nutrition in a normal diet. Solutions containing dextrose provide calories and may be given intravenously in combination with amino acids and fats. This is called total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and is used to provide nutrition to those who cannot absorb or get carbohydrates, amino acids, and fats throu Continue reading >>

Glucose - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Glucose - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Glucose is a form of natural sugar that is normally produced by the liver. Glucose is a source of energy, and all the cells and organs in your body need glucose to function properly. Glucose as a medication is given either by mouth (orally) or by injection. Glucose is used to treat very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), most often in people with diabetes mellitus. Glucose is given by injection to treat insulin shock (low blood sugar caused by using insulin and then not eating a meal or eating enough food afterward). This medicine works by quickly increasing the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucose is also used to provide carbohydrate calories to a person who cannot eat because of illness, trauma, or other medical condition. Glucose is sometimes given to people who are sick from drinking too much alcohol. Glucose may also be used to treat hyperkalemia (high levels of potassium in your blood). Glucose may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use. You should not take glucose tablets, liquid, or gel if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in these forms of the medicine. If possible before you receive a glucose injection, tell your doctor if you have: diabetes (unless you are using this medicine to treat insulin-induced hypoglycemia); heart disease, coronary artery disease, or history of a stroke; Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Tell your caregivers or call your doctor right away if you have: redness, swelling, warmth, or skin changes where an injection was given; a Continue reading >>

What Are Glucose Tablets?

What Are Glucose Tablets?

ANSWER Glucose tablets are chewable sugar used by people with diabetes to raise their blood sugar quickly when it drops dangerously low, a condition known as hypoglycemia. These products also come in a variety of flavors and forms such as gels, liquids, and powders. If you take a medication that makes you prone to this problem, your doctor may tell you to carry glucose tablets with you -- especially during exercise. Continue reading >>

Why Carry Glucose Tablets: An Overview Of Hypoglycemia

Why Carry Glucose Tablets: An Overview Of Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is also known as low blood sugar. People with diabetes monitor their blood sugar levels to avoid this condition. From diabetic testing to using glucose tablets, there are ways to avoid hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is when your blood sugar is too low. Symptoms of low blood glucose include blurred vision, rapid heartbeat, nervousness, aggression, crankiness, hunger, headaches, trouble sleeping, confusion, shakiness, numbness, tingling, tiredness and weakness. Very low blood sugar may cause fainting, seizure or possibly a coma. Have diabetic testing supplies on hand to check your blood sugar. Symptoms can mimic high or low sugar so always use diabetic testing strips to verify levels. Certain oral medications commonly used to treat diabetes may cause hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas include glipizide, glimepiride and glyburide. These pills stimulate the pancreas to make more insulin and may put you at risk for hypoglycemia. All types of insulin shots can cause hypoglycemia as well. Low blood sugar is caused by skipping or delaying meals or eating meals that are too small. Drinking alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Increased physical activity may also cause hypoglycemia. Driving with hypoglycemia is dangerous because you may have trouble seeing clearly, difficulty concentrating and might not be able to react quickly. Always check your blood sugar before driving when driving for an hour or more and on insulin. During long trips, check blood sugar levels frequently and eat snacks. If your blood sugar level drops, stop for treatment. Your blood sugar should stabilize before driving again. Reactive hypoglycemia happens to people who do not have diabetes. Blood sugar levels drop within four hours after eating. In most instances, the meal has a high level of carbohydrates Continue reading >>

Glucose Tabs For Non-diabetics

Glucose Tabs For Non-diabetics

D.D. Family T1 since July 2010 Pumping since July 2011 Thought you all might find this interesting. Dextrose tabs (basically the same as glucose tabs) are marketed here in Germany to the general population as energy/performance boosters, or an alternative to coffee: D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Thanks Beau that is very interesting to see, something like the power drinks they have in the USA. A little bottle is full of glucose and who knows what else. My son played High School Soccer and Tennis. They would use those packets of somekind of glucose gel to give them an energy boost. But they were running constantly for 90 minutes. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. Thought you all might find this interesting. Dextrose tabs (basically the same as glucose tabs) are marketed here in Germany to the general population as energy/performance boosters, or an alternative to coffee: I think it's crazy. Some people believe it's healthy. Not being a German-speaker (or understander) I got the general gist of the advert. Glucose tablets are exactly what they say on the tin, tablets high in glucose. I wouldn't call them a 'healthy' option, but they will work for a non D person in providing a boost to the blood system, resulting in an energy lift. I don't see anything wrong in a non D person taking them for that reason if they wish. As diabetics, most of us would only take them if needed to increase bg levels when low. They're not th Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Unless you are eating a meal right away, the best treatment for lows is a combination of simple and complex carbohydrates plus some protein. Quickly treating lows lessens stress hormone release and lowers the chance of the blood sugar going high after a reaction. You'll feel better if the body is quickly resupplied with the fuel it needs.Your brain, muscles and other cells will thank you for not prolonging their misery. Eat 15 to 20 grams of fast acting carbohydrates immediately. Consider how much unused bolus insulin may still be active. Decide whether complex carbohydrates and/or protein are needed to keep you stable until you eat your next meal. Test your blood sugar 30 minutes later to make sure it has risen. Repeat step 1 if necessary. After a moderate or severe low blood sugar, wait 30 to 45 minutes before driving or operating machinery. A return to normal coordination and thinking is slower than the return to a normal blood sugar. You may need to eat more than 20 grams for a low: when you took a carb bolus for a meal but never ate it. when it has been only an hour or two since your last injection of rapid insulin. when you have been more physically active. Glucose is the "sugar" in blood sugar and may also be referred to as dextrose on labels. It comes in tablets, such as Dex4 or BD Glucose tablets, and in certain candies like Sweet Tarts. Glucose breaks down quickly and reaches the blood as 100 percent glucose, which makes it the best choice for raising the blood sugar quickly. Another good product for raising your glucose is Glucolift Glucose Tablets . Table sugar consists of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule, so when it breaks down in the stomach, only half is immediately available as glucose. Fruit juices, like orange juice, contain mostly fruct Continue reading >>

Use Of Dietary Sugars Or Glucose Tablets In Correcting Hypoglycemia

Use Of Dietary Sugars Or Glucose Tablets In Correcting Hypoglycemia

Proponents may suggest an advantage of one over the other, but the data is not so clear. With tighter control of blood glucose and lower recommended blood levels, the risk of development of hypoglycemia in the face of diabetes is on the rise, necessitating the use of self-administered treatments by diabetes patients who are experiencing mild to moderate symptomatic hypoglycemia. To date, in the conscious hypoglycemic patient, the accepted method of correction has been administration of oral glucose, either in the form of commercially available tablets or dietary sugars. Until recently, the comparative benefits between these two treatment options has not been clearly determined, giving rise to the question, is there a clear advantage of one over the other? To date, most studies investigating this issue have been quite small, and of questionable design. In a recent issue of the British publication Emergency Medicine Journal, investigators conducted a systematic review of the literature and identified 1,774 unique papers focused on effects of the treatment options on relief of symptomatic hypoglycemia, time to resolution, blood glucose levels, development of complications, and hospital lengths of stay (if admission were required as a result of the hypoglycemic episode). Following a defined screening process, four total articles were selected for data pooling and meta-analysis. Three of the articles were randomized controlled trials, with the fourth being an observational study. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mantel-Haenszel random-effects model to calculate heterogeneity (I2), pooled plots and treatment effect using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences (MDs) for continuous outcomes with 95% CIs. The pooling of outcomes data was per Continue reading >>

What Are Glucose Tablets Used For?

What Are Glucose Tablets Used For?

Glucose tablets are composed of glucose sugar and other ingredients such as flavoring, preservatives and binding agents. Used mainly by people with diabetes, glucose tablets help to treat low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia. You can purchase different brands of glucose tablets from most drugstores. Keep them on hand in case of hypoglycemia, especially if you take insulin or oral diabetes medication. Video of the Day Low Blood Pressure Signs If you have diabetes, you may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia if your blood sugar falls below 70 milligrams per deciliter of blood, although you should speak with your health care provider about your individual blood sugar goals. The symptoms of hypoglycemia include feeling shaky, dizzy, sleepy, confused, angry, anxious, sad or hungry -- or having a rapid heartbeat, lack of coordination and tingling or numbness of your lips or tongue. Hypoglycemia is dangerous because it can lead to seizure, unconsciousness and even death if blood glucose continues to fall and is untreated. Fast-Acting Carbs If you have hypoglycemia symptoms, check your blood sugar if you can. The American Diabetes Association recommends taking 15 to 20 grams of carbohydrates if your blood sugar is indeed below 70 milligrams per deciliter. The amount of carbohydrate grams in one glucose tablet varies depending on the brand, so you should read the nutrition facts label. The Joslin Diabetes Center says that about three glucose tablets is 15 grams of carbohydrates. After consuming 15 to 20 grams of carbohydrates -- roughly three to four glucose tablets -- rest for 15 minutes while waiting for your blood glucose to rise. After 15 minutes, recheck your blood sugar. If it is still low -- less than 70 milligrams per deciliter, according to the Joslin Diabetes Ce Continue reading >>

Publix Glucose Sour Apple

Publix Glucose Sour Apple

Glucose is a form of natural sugar that is normally produced by the liver. Glucose is a source of energy, and all the cells and organs in your body need glucose to function properly. Glucose as a medication is given either by mouth (orally) or by injection. Glucose is used to treat very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), most often in people with diabetes mellitus. Glucose is given by injection to treat insulin shock (low blood sugar caused by using insulin and then not eating a meal or eating enough food afterward). This medicine works by quickly increasing the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucose is also used to provide carbohydrate calories to a person who cannot eat because of illness, trauma, or other medical condition. Glucose is sometimes given to people who are sick from drinking too much alcohol. Glucose may also be used to treat hyperkalemia (high levels of potassium in your blood). Glucose may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use. You should not take glucose tablets, liquid, or gel if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in these forms of the medicine. If possible before you receive a glucose injection, tell your doctor if you have: diabetes (unless you are using this medicine to treat insulin-induced hypoglycemia); heart disease, coronary artery disease, or history of a stroke; Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Tell your caregivers or call your doctor right away if you have: redness, swelling, warmth, or skin changes where an injection was given; a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Tablets For Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes: Tablets For Type 2 Diabetes

Tablets that are used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus are known as oral hypoglycaemics or antihyperglycaemics. There are a number of different types of oral hypoglycaemics available for treating type 2 diabetes, and they work in different ways. They may be used on their own and some can be used in conjunction with each other, or with insulin. Biguanides Metformin (e.g. Diabex, Glucophage) is the only biguanide currently available in Australia. Metformin is generally the first choice hypoglycaemic medication prescribed for people with type 2 diabetes. There are several combination medicines that contain metformin plus another type of oral hypoglycaemic medicine in one tablet. These include: metformin plus a sulfonylurea — glibenclamide (brand name Glucovance); metformin plus a glitazone — rosiglitazone (brand name Avandamet); and metformin plus incretin enhancers — DPP-4 inhibitors, including sitagliptin (brand name Janumet), vildagliptin (brand name Galvumet), saxagliptin (brand name Kombiglyze), alogliptin (Nesina Met) and linagliptin (brand name Trajentamet). How do they work? Biguanides work by reducing the amount of glucose produced by the liver, increasing the uptake of glucose by muscle and fat cells, and slowing the absorption of glucose by the intestine. This in turn reduces the level of glucose in the bloodstream. Side effects Lactic acidosis The most serious complication associated with metformin is lactic acidosis. This happens when lactic acid builds up in the body faster than it can be metabolised. It is a potentially fatal condition but is very rare. When lactic acidosis occurs in people treated with metformin it is generally associated with old age, or people with kidney, liver or heart problems, those taking more than 2 grams of metformin per day Continue reading >>

Chemist Direct | What Are Glucose Tablets Used For?

Chemist Direct | What Are Glucose Tablets Used For?

To immediately increase the blood glucose levels after hypoglycaemia sets in, use glucose tablets in the correct strength to reduce symptoms. Diabetic people who suffer from the condition known as hypoglycaemia, or sudden low blood sugar levels that fall below 70 mg/dl, often need to immediately consume some form of glucose to boost blood sugar back to a safe reading. Using glucose tablets , which contain glucose sugar, flavouring agents, preservatives and binding agents, can give immediate aid and help you avoid serious complications. If this is a common occurrence you should seek the advice of your healthcare provider about how to set safe blood sugar level goals and how to best achieve them. If you are diabetic and taking some form of insulin or other medication such as chromium and you start feeling dizzy, sleepy, or confused and experience a faster heartbeat you need to immediately check your blood sugar levels. If the insulin dose was too much, the energy is burned faster and you then experience hypoglycaemic symptoms. In addition to this, you could feel a prickling or a lack of feeling in your lips or tongue, and a lack of physical coordination or feel confused emotions such as anger, sadness, hunger or anxiousness. If left untreated and blood glucose continues to fall, it can cause seizures, unconsciousness and in extreme cases, death. If you feel that you may be experiencing hypoglycaemia you can quickly eat or drink food items with 15-20 grams of carbohydrates to try to get your levels back to normal. If food is not easily available you may want to use glucose tablets for your hypoglycaemia condition. Be sure to ask your doctor for a prescription and purchase them at your local pharmacy. Glucose tablets are convenient and portable but check the label to see h Continue reading >>

Why Glucose Tablets Really Are Best For Hypoglycemia

Why Glucose Tablets Really Are Best For Hypoglycemia

It often comes as a surprise to people without diabetes when I inform them that the biggest immediate risk for anyone with Type 1 diabetes is not high blood sugar, but low blood sugar. Me: I need some sugar, I’m running low. My well-intentioned but misinformed companion: You can’t have sugar, you’re diabetic! “Can’t have sugar” is the CliffsNotes version of diabetes that most of the world understands, but we know it’s a far more complicated and nuanced condition than a simple prohibition on eating cookies. We have to be masters of physiology. We have to understand how ALL the foods we eat interact internally and how those interactions affect the rise in our blood sugar. And nowhere is that more important than when we are dealing with hypoglycemia. Now, I have committed the sin of treating a low with a brownie or a candy bar before. We all have. It’s just so tempting! I mean, when else can you say, with ANY truth at all, that you have a medical need for dessert?!? “I’m low, give me another slice of pie!” “Looks like I need some ice cream!” Our health-care providers, educators, and all the literature in the world tells us we should treat a low with glucose tablets, juice, or another source of straight, fast-acting glucose rather than these other indulgent (and generally high-fat) treats. But why? Why can’t I have a cookie when I’m low? What’s so great about those chalky, OK-tasting-but-not-at-all-exciting glucose tablets? The answer is in the fat! We’ve all heard of the “pizza effect,” right? It’s that highly annoying phenomenon where we have to split our insulin dose because food that contains a high percentage of fat messes with the absorption of carbohydrates. Specifically, it delays that absorption. When I have pizza, I will see Continue reading >>

Glucose Tablets Likely Better For Easing Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Glucose Tablets Likely Better For Easing Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

(Reuters Health) - When people with diabetes experience a dangerous drop in blood sugar, glucose tablets might be a better option than a sugary food or drink, a study suggests. People with diabetes can develop hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, if they skip a meal, exercise harder than usual or take too much insulin or other diabetes medications. Low blood sugar can cause fatigue, anxiety, rapid heartbeat, sweating, mental confusion or even coma or seizures if not treated quickly. For a new study, researchers pooled data from four papers in the medical literature that compared the effect of dietary sugars and glucose tablets on relieving low blood sugar symptoms, including three randomized trials, which are generally the most reliable kind of medical study. As reported in the Emergency Medicine Journal, the adults and children in the studies had type 1 or type 2 diabetes. All of them were awake throughout their episodes of low blood sugar. Altogether, 515 low blood sugar episodes were treated with dietary sugar and 232 were treated with glucose tablets. Across the four studies, different forms of dietary sugars were used, including Skittles candies, orange juice, Mentos candies, jelly beans, cornstarch, milk and glucose gels. In general, the individual substances were about as effective as the glucose tablets for getting blood sugar levels to rise. When results from all four studies were combined, neither dietary sugars nor glucose tablets reliably returned blood sugar levels to normal within 10 to 15 minutes, according to the research team. “Regardless of the oral (method) used to treat hypoglycemia, time is required for absorption before the measured blood returns to the normal range and the patient’s symptoms improve,” the authors wrote. However, people who used Continue reading >>

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