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What If My Blood Sugar Is Over 300

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Exercise is an important part of any diabetes treatment plan. To avoid potential problems, check your blood sugar before, during and after exercise. Diabetes and exercise go hand in hand, at least when it comes to managing your diabetes. Exercise can help you improve your blood sugar control, boost your overall fitness, and reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. But diabetes and exercise pose unique challenges, too. To exercise safely, it's crucial to track your blood sugar before, during and after physical activity. You'll learn how your body responds to exercise, which can help you prevent potentially dangerous blood sugar fluctuations. Before exercise: Check your blood sugar before your workout Before jumping into a fitness program, get your doctor's OK to exercise — especially if you've been inactive. Talk to your doctor about any activities you're contemplating, the best time to exercise and the potential impact of medications on your blood sugar as you become more active. For the best health benefits, experts recommend at least 150 minutes a week of moderately intense physical activities such as: Fast walking Lap swimming Bicycling If you're taking insulin or medications that can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), test your blood sugar 30 minutes before exercising. Consider these general guidelines relative to your blood sugar level — measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Lower than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Your blood sugar may be too low to exercise safely. Eat a small snack containing 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates, such as fruit juice, fruit, crackers or even glucose tablets before you begin your workout. 100 to 250 mg/dL (5.6 to 13.9 mmol/L). You're good to go. For most people, this is a safe pre-exercise Continue reading >>

My Blood Sugar Is Over 300 What To Do?

My Blood Sugar Is Over 300 What To Do?

Diabetes is that abnormality when the blood sugar level in blood does not get utilized and reflects. Naturally, it’s a state of decreased immunity, and the patient needs to reduce his intake of carbohydrate. When the blood sugar level rises above normalcy, it’s a matter of concern. How do you feel when diabetes level rises above 300? When the diabetes level rises above 300, it’s an abnormal condition. In fact, you may feel dizzy and dehydrated. You will feel nausea and might faint in that case. Unusual sugar level might be fatal and result in death even. You may diagnose the symptoms like- feeling thirsty, drying of mouth, blurry vision and feeling fatigue might occur. The bloodstream begins to flow in the cortisol which is in a continuous state of emergency in the body. When the final breakdown starts in the body, the downward spiral series of events stops. The adrenal system may be swollen, the immune system could be depressed, and there could be shrinkage of the thymus, shrinkage in spleen and lymph nodes. Thereby there could be a series of problems and recovery could be delayed. How must you act when your blood sugar level rises above 300? Postprandial blood sugar level should not be more than 140 mg/dl. In case if it’s more than 300 mg/dl than you are at high risk. There can be some immediate measures to be taken when you observe that the sugar level is not coming down. Immediately drink water. It will dilute your blood level and soot down the blood sugar level. Exercise on a regular basis. It will help you to control sugar level. In fact, you may take the steps and perform an up-down basis activity. It will lower your abnormal level of blood sugar. You must keep a check on what you eat. In fact, hyperglycemia level will prompt you to have a full test on th Continue reading >>

When Your Blood Sugar Is Too High Or Too Low

When Your Blood Sugar Is Too High Or Too Low

Sometimes, no matter how hard you try to keep your blood sugar in the range your doctor has advised, it can be too high or too low. Blood sugar that is too high or too low can make you very sick. Here's how to handle these emergencies. What You Need to Know about High Blood Sugar If your blood sugar stays over 240, it is too high. High blood sugar usually comes on slowly. It happens when you don't have enough insulin in your body. High blood sugar can happen if you miss taking your diabetes medicine, eat too much, or don't get enough exercise. Sometimes, medicines you take for other problems may cause high blood sugar. Be sure to tell your doctor about other medicines you take. This chart shows the ranges of blood sugar. Having an infection or being sick or under stress can also make your blood sugar too high. That is why it is very important to test your blood and keep taking your medicine (insulin or diabetes pills) when you have an infection or are sick. Your blood sugar may be too high if you are very thirsty and tired, have blurry vision, are losing weight fast, and have to go to the bathroom often. Very high blood sugar may make you feel sick to your stomach, faint, or throw up. It can cause you to lose too much fluid from your body. Testing your blood sugar often, especially when you are sick, will warn you that your blood sugar may be rising too high. If your blood sugar stays over 300 when you check it two times in a row, call your doctor. You may need a change in your insulin shots or diabetes pills, or a change in your meal plan. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and sa Continue reading >>

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

High Sugar Level in Just One Week! How I Lowered My Diabetic High Blood Sugar From 399 mg/dl to 112 mg/dl in Just One Week! UPDATE: In January of 2017 I weighed 215 pounds. Today is June 7th and I weighed 150.2 today!!! Amen! I've lost 65 pounds in just a few months!!! Here's a ukulele video I made last month, showing before and after. My sugar last year was 399 mg/dl, but is now 75 mg/dl. My mmol/L was 9.8 last year, but was 6.7 two months ago when I weighed 185. My doctor said my diabetes is all GONE! I've lost another 35 pounds and am now 150 pounds. I'll get my glucose tested again in a couple weeks, which should be 5 point something. My friend, LOSE WEIGHT if you want to get rid of the type II diabetes. I explain in the video and notes how I lost so much weight. I DIDN'T take any diabetes drugs!!! I DIDN'T take any pills or follow anyone's quack diet plan. I simply limited my daily calories to 1,000 or less, and walked a couple hours a day, here a little and there a little. Drink only water. Eat big salads (with hardly any dressing) and stay away from processed and breaded foods. Eat tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, AND FAST A DAY OR TWO EACH WEEK, eating nothing! Don't let people tell you it's unhealthy to eat under 1,000 calories a day. It depends what you're eating. Losing your feet to diabetes is MUCH WORSE! Americans are plagued with “SITTING DISEASE,” sedentary, gluttons and lazy. If you are type II diabetic, like me, this may perhaps be the most important article you ever read concerning your health. I can help you tremendously! I have nothing to sell. I am a born-again Christian and I want to help as many people as I can. You'll love me after reading this article if you have type II diabetes. But before I begin, please understand that I am not a profession Continue reading >>

What Could Happen If Your Blood Sugar Is Over 300?

What Could Happen If Your Blood Sugar Is Over 300?

Mild high blood sugar is described as a blood sugar level between 200 and 350 milligrams per deciliter, explains WebMD. A blood sugar level higher than 350 milligrams per deciliter is a more serious problem that can lead to more severe symptoms such as blurry vision, drowsiness, lightheadedness, vomiting, rapid breathing and a weak pulse. Patients with high blood sugar that continues to rise may lose consciousness, become confused or act extremely lethargic. Diabetics can avoid high blood sugar levels by taking their insulin or diabetes pills exactly as recommended. When high blood sugar occurs in spite of proper medication use, a patient should contact his doctor immediately. A change in medication or meal plans may be required. Even though diabetics may not show any obvious symptoms, a sustained high blood sugar level has a number of long-lasting effects on the body, explains Mayo Clinic. Blood sugar coats the red blood cells, making them sticky and allowing cholesterol to build up on the insides of blood vessels, increasing the risk of heart attack and stroke. High blood sugar also leads to eye problems, kidney damage, gum disease and nerve damage in many patients. Learn more about Medical Ranges & Levels Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: Treat It Early

Hyperglycemia: Treat It Early

Hyperglycemia is when your blood glucose level goes too high; it is high blood sugar. Part of managing diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) on a daily basis is learning how to avoid hyperglycemia. Being able to recognize the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia early is helpful. If your blood sugar shoots up too high, it can be dangerous—and it can possibly land you in the hospital, especially if it leads to diabetic ketoacidosis. Also, if your blood sugar is continually in the high range, your likelihood of developing long-term diabetes complications such as nerve damage, kidney failure, and heart disease rises dramatically. So it is important to detect when your blood glucose reaches unacceptable levels. Early Signs and Symptoms of Hyperglycemia The best defensive tactic for identifying elevated blood glucose is testing with a glucose meter. Your doctor will advise you how frequently you should test and what levels you should be aiming for. However, your body can also let you know when there is too much glucose circulating in your blood. It may prompt you with: thirst dry mouth blurry vision fatigue If you experience these symptoms, check your blood glucose right away. Hyperglycemia Treatments If your blood glucose is high (based on the target levels your doctor said you should be aiming for), it is time to act. Your physician and diabetes educator have likely taught you how to treat high blood glucose levels—how to bring them back to a target range. Some possible ideas for treating hyperglycemia: Exercise: Exercise can help your body use the extra glucose, whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. But please note, if your blood glucose level is above 250 mg/dL and you have type 1 diabetes, you’ll need to check for ketones before exerci Continue reading >>

Don’t Eat If Your Blood Sugar Is Over 150 Mg/dl

Don’t Eat If Your Blood Sugar Is Over 150 Mg/dl

Q: Recently I read an article in Post Graduate Medicine (“Effective Insulin Use,” Vol. 95, No. 8, June 1994, pgs. 52, 54, 58-60, 63-64, and 67). The article suggests the patient not eat if the blood glucose is greater than 150 mg/dl. I would appreciate you reading this article and giving me your opinion. Donna Doty, RN, BSN, CDE Methodist Hospital Gary, IN [Editor: An excellent question. We encourage all our readers to send us questions to answer. Coincidentally, the article you ask about was written by one of DIABETES IN-TERVEIW’s advisory board members: Nancy Bohannon, MD. We submitted your question to our board member Peter Lodewick, MD, diabetes expert and author of A Doctor Looks at Diabetes: His and Yours. Before we print his answer to your question, we’re presenting an excerpt from Dr. Bohannon’s article.] “My routine advice is as follows: if the blood glucose value is over 150 mg/dl before a meal, insulin should be taken and the meal postponed (not skipped) until the blood glucose is below 150 mg/dl. The glucose level should be checked hourly until it is below 200 mg/dl and then every 1/2 hour until it is below 150 mg/dl. A level that is still high after 1 1/2 to 2 hours without the patient’s eating is an indication that it was a good thing the patient didn’t eat! In the past, most patients would have eaten, saying, ‘my doctor told me never to miss or be late for a meal because I could get hypoglycemia.’ However, if the insulin was taken 3 hours previously and the blood glucose level remained above 150 mg/dl, food obviously was not necessary. “What happens if the blood glucose level is still high after 2 to 3 hours? A few more units of insulin should be taken and the meal again postponed until the glucose level is below 150 mg/dl. Occasiona Continue reading >>

What To Do When Blood Sugar Spikes

What To Do When Blood Sugar Spikes

It can be frustrating trying to keep blood sugar levels under control. Day by day, they can fluctuate widely, and they’re not always predictable. Although the greatest danger to people with diabetes is when blood glucose gets too low, it’s also important to take action when blood glucose is high. Thankfully, there are steps you can take to help prevent and treat these unexpected spikes. High blood sugar, also called hyperglycemia, often develops in response to too little insulin or other glucose-lowering medication, or too much food. It’s important to address hyperglycemia. Not only can it cause problems like impaired thinking in the short term, it can increase the risk for serious problems like heart disease, kidney damage, and blindness over time. Here’s what you can do about hyperglycemia. On top of tracking your diet and blood sugar, regular exercise is a key part of managing your diabetes. And while any exercise is better than none, certain activities have specific benefits for people with diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Know Your Body Estimating how much your blood sugar will rise or fall in response to a specific meal or snack isn’t always easy. But you can better predict these fluctuations by investigating how your body reacts to food. Closely monitor your food intake, including your favorite foods and meals, for a week or two. If possible, check your blood glucose both before and after you eat. Keep a log of your results and review them to learn when your blood sugar is most likely to spike. Recognize the Symptoms Regularly monitoring your blood Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

​This article is written for type 2 diabetics who need help coming down from a very high blood sugar during a single, isolated high blood sugar event. If you want to try an stabilize your baseline, consider signing up for my Baseline Blood Sugar Challenge course. ​THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR REAL MEDICAL ADVICE. If you're a type 2 diabetic and your blood sugar is high right now (greater than 300mg/dL for at least 6 hours), the first thing you should do is call your doctor. So, if you haven't called anyone for help yet, please stop reading this article and call your doctor. If your doctor is able to help, then you need not read on. Also, if you are having symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis, stop reading this article and go to the hospital immediately. Diabetic Ketoacidosis can kill you if left untreated. But. If you're in a situation where your blood sugar has been high for an extended period of time, you could perhaps consider taking the following steps to solve your blood sugar problem. Disclaimer: This is friendly, non-medical advice from a random diabetic person you don't even know, which is a very (very) poor substitute for real, actual medical advice. Use at your own risk. First, you should try and lower your blood sugar without injectable insulin by completing the following steps: 1. Check your blood sugar. Write down the time and your blood sugar level. 2. Drink water (this doesn't actually lower blood sugar, but it helps flush sugar and ketones from your body, if you have them). Continue drinking water, but please don't make yourself sick. 3. Move. As in, walk. Walk around the block or walk in place or haul your ass up and down the stairs for 30-60 minutes. Walking helps your cells become less insulin resistant, which is what you need right now. Do N Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels: Tips To Help Bring It Down

High Blood Sugar Levels: Tips To Help Bring It Down

Have you suddenly realized that you have high blood sugar levels and not sure how to bring them down? It is important to do something because having high levels for any prolonged length of time is what leads to complications occurring. So let's cover a simple strategy that can help in the short term and talk about lowering levels over the long term. Effective Strategy For Lowering High Blood Sugar Levels 1. Drink water When your blood sugar is high it becomes very thick, like syrup and gets very sluggish. Drinking water helps to dilute your blood and increases your rate of urination, which helps reduce your sugars. Drinking water might sound like a weird thing to do and many doctors would raise their eyebrows at this one but this works very well for the majority of people and is the singular best strategy to help bring your high blood sugar levels down. Simple, yet effective. 2. Exercise Usually water won't be enough to bring down your high levels on it's own. You need to do some gentle exercise to help pump the glucose out of the blood stream and into the muscles. The only way to do that is to MOVE!! Try going for a gentle walk, take the water with you. And if your levels are exceptionally high, it's always a good idea to take someone on the walk with you (just in case). Alternatively just walk around your yard or even just up and down your hallway. It doesn't have to be a fast walk because when blood sugar levels are high you do not want to exert yourself, just get your body moving a bit. Let's emphasize this again: Do not exert yourself when you have high blood sugar levels. If you are unable to walk due to pain or for some other reason, just keep drinking water. 3. Have a high protein snack Eat half an egg, or a tablespoon of natural peanut butter, or a slice of che Continue reading >>

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

One of the challenges of managing diabetes is maintaining consistent blood sugar (glucose) levels. Even with diligence, some situations can cause high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, while others can bring on low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. So it’s important to know the signs of both high and low levels, and what actions to take to bring them back within a desired range. Monitoring your blood sugar levels with a glucose meter will do a lot to help you keep those levels steady and avoid the complications that can come with diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, how often you check your blood sugar level depends on many factors, including your age, the type and severity of your diabetes, the length of time that you've had the condition, and the presence of any diabetes-related complications. About High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Common signs of high blood sugar include frequent urination, fatigue, dry or itchy skin, feeling thirsty, more frequent infections, and eating more food but not gaining as much weight as usual, says Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute in San Diego, California. A blood sugar reading above 180 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered above normal and can bring on these symptoms, although it’s possible to have high blood sugar without any symptoms, Dr. Philis-Tsimikas says. A reading above 300 mg/dL is considered severe. If your blood sugar is above 250 mg/dL for two days, Philis-Tsimikas advises informing your doctor and asking for specific treatment recommendations. Blood sugar levels above 300 mg/dL can cause nausea, drowsiness, blurred vision, confusion, and dizziness, especially when standing up from a sitting or lying position. Ways to treat high blood sugar include: Taking your prescribed medicati Continue reading >>

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From São Paulo, Brazil: Why shouldn't we exercise when the blood sugar level is over 250mg/dl? Why does the blood sugar rise? Answer: First of all I want to thank you for sending this question to the diabetes team. This is a question frequently asked by many individuals, and the answer always deserves repeating. Before you begin an exercise session, be sure you are in good control of your diabetes. The beneficial effect of exercise on an individual's blood glucose is to lower it. The availability of insulin to muscle cells is one factor that will determine the effect exercise has on blood glucose levels. One of insulin's primary roles is to allow muscle cells to use glucose. With exercise, less insulin is needed for this to happen, but don't forget, you do need some insulin. Therefore, if you begin exercise with an insulin deficiency, blood glucose levels and ketones can rise. How can this happen? When blood glucose levels are elevated (generally greater than 250 to 300 mg/dl) (meaning there is not enough insulin in your body), when you exercise, your body starts to break down fat and makes even more glucose to feed the hungry muscle cells. The breakdown of fat to ketones exceeds the ability of muscles to use them. The cells can't get the glucose through, because there is not enough insulin. This is why sometimes when you exercise blood glucose may go up instead of down. Ketones can also increase your blood glucose. The general guidelines for exercise are as follows: If blood glucose is greater than 250 mg/dl, check for ketones. If ketones are present, do not exercise. If blood glucose is over 300 mg/dl, do not exercise, whether ketones are present or not. Lastly, keep your doctor and other diabetes team members aware of your activity level and show them your Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

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