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What Does It Mean When Your Blood Sugar Meter Says Hi?

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

If you've just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need some supplies to help you manage your blood sugar. These include: Blood Sugar Meter This device, also called a glucose meter or monitor, measures how much sugar (or glucose) is in a drop of your blood. It can tell you when your sugar is too low or too high. Talk to your doctor about what to do in those situations. Glucose meters can also show you how diet, exercise, stress, sickness, and your medications affect blood sugar. “Get the [one] that you feel comfortable and confident using,” says Jane Seley, a diabetes nurse practitioner at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Make sure the screen is large enough to read. And choose a meter that requires less than a microliter blood sample. “It’s much more comfortable,” Seley says. “You don’t have to stick yourself as deep. It’s much easier to be successful, and you won’t waste as many test strips.” Consider a meter that can download your readings to your smartphone, tablet, or computer. “You can see charts of how your blood sugars differ throughout the day,” Seley says. “It helps you make better decisions about things like when to exercise and what to have for breakfast.” Test Strips, Lancets, and Lancet Device Each small plastic strip contains chemicals that convert the sugar in your blood into an electric current that your meter can read. Wash your hands first, then put a test strip into your meter. Prick the side of your fingertip with a small needle called a lancet. The lancet fits inside a lancet device. About the shape and size of a pen, it’s spring-loaded to help you prick your finger easily with just the right amount of pressure. You then squeeze a single drop of blood onto the strip, and your meter measures the sugar. If you’r Continue reading >>

Ketones...what Are They? And What Do They Mean?

Ketones...what Are They? And What Do They Mean?

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a very dangerous condition in which consistently high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) cause toxic compounds (called ketones) to build up in your blood and urine. You should test your urine or blood for ketones in any of the following situations: Your blood sugar is higher than 15 mmol/L You have symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) such as frequent urination, extreme thirst, nausea/vomiting, confusion, and fruit-smelling breath You are sick and are not eating or drinking well and/or nauseated and vomiting One can test for ketones in the urine or the blood. Urine ketone strips can be bought without a prescription and turn a dark colour after 15 seconds once dipped into urine. The amount of ketones is indicated by how dark the strip turns. This is usually the way a woman with gestational diabetes tests her urine. Another method which is more accurate in distinguishing the type of ketones, that is, either lack of insulin or starvation, is to test the blood. There are some meters that have strips, very similar to blood glucose testing strips, that will indicate the level of ketones. People with type 1 diabetes and particularly children and their families, are often taught this type of ketone testing. Early treatment can help you avoid hospitalization or developing DKA. Speak to your healthcare team to come up with a plan to manage high ketones. If you cannot manage high ketones on your own, it is important to seek medical treatment which can include: Intravenous (IV) fluid replacement: it is important to rehydrate with fluids to help dilute extra sugar in your blood. Electrolyte replacement: when a person has high ketones or DKA, their electrolyte levels (such as potassium, and sodium) tend to be low. It is important to replenish electrolytes Continue reading >>

Accu Check Says Hi | Diabetic Connect

Accu Check Says Hi | Diabetic Connect

You are correct on most meters it is a reading over 600 on some it is 650. If you have your owners manual it will tell you what the high reading is. If you don't, you can call the 800 number on the back of the meter and they will help you. Type1Lou is correct abount carb couning. I started counting carbs 30 yrs ago to lose weight. Recently I was prediagnosed in Sept 2011 with high blood sugar of 250. In Dec. 2011 my doctor gave me a test kit. My tests varried from 110 to 185. These tests continued for about 5 weeks.Oh, I only test once a day ant 4am. I kept a record of what I ate and discovered the less carbs the lower the sugar. Also, I talked to other people with D and was told to lower my carbs. As of now, I keep my carbs down to 60 grms a day and for the last three days my b/s has been at 116. I also lost a lot of weight, and I do exercise about 10 to 15 min a day riding a stationary bike. I thought I was having faulty readings but didn,t know how to find out. How do you know if your meter is correct? I use the Bayer Contour. I also keep tract of the sugar and sodium in foods Talked to the nurse yesterday and got bumped up to 30 units. Last night was 327 before dinner, morning reading was 241. Tried to eat a healthy dinner Wife boiled a chicken, stirred in some hot sauce and seasonings, and added some lettuce & lime. Had a Sprite Zero instead of sweet tea or a regular soda, and felt pretty good when I finally went to bed. I appreciate everyone's comments and concern. It means a lot to know that if I have a question, there are plenty of helping voices on here to lend their knowledge. You may also wish to begin counting your carbs since it is the carbs that you eat that convert to sugar in your blood. I weigh around 120 lbs and allow myself 120 grams of carb per day. Continue reading >>

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

One of the challenges of managing diabetes is maintaining consistent blood sugar (glucose) levels. Even with diligence, some situations can cause high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, while others can bring on low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. So it’s important to know the signs of both high and low levels, and what actions to take to bring them back within a desired range. Monitoring your blood sugar levels with a glucose meter will do a lot to help you keep those levels steady and avoid the complications that can come with diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, how often you check your blood sugar level depends on many factors, including your age, the type and severity of your diabetes, the length of time that you've had the condition, and the presence of any diabetes-related complications. About High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Common signs of high blood sugar include frequent urination, fatigue, dry or itchy skin, feeling thirsty, more frequent infections, and eating more food but not gaining as much weight as usual, says Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute in San Diego, California. A blood sugar reading above 180 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered above normal and can bring on these symptoms, although it’s possible to have high blood sugar without any symptoms, Dr. Philis-Tsimikas says. A reading above 300 mg/dL is considered severe. If your blood sugar is above 250 mg/dL for two days, Philis-Tsimikas advises informing your doctor and asking for specific treatment recommendations. Blood sugar levels above 300 mg/dL can cause nausea, drowsiness, blurred vision, confusion, and dizziness, especially when standing up from a sitting or lying position. Ways to treat high blood sugar include: Taking your prescribed medicati Continue reading >>

Meter Reading Of High

Meter Reading Of High

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What does it mean when your meter reading simply says high? I am worried to death about my husband. Please help. For the One Touch meters, a reading of "High" means a blood glucose level of over 600 which is considered a medical emergency. Did he test more than once? Did he also perform a control test (with the control solution) to make sure the meter is functioning correctly? Double check to make sure the code on the strip container matches the code on the meter (if the meter requires one)? There are quite a few things you can do to ensure that the reading is accurate before panicking. If it does turn out that he's consistently getting the "High" as a reading after doing the above and re-testing a couple of times, you should insist he contact his doctor immediately. if he's still reading 'high' then you need to take him to hospital to get those bg levels down I ate a banana today and had a reading of 505. That didn't quite compute so I washed my hands. I was 250. I didn't think I bolused enough for the banana, which was why I was testing. But even so, 250 is a lot better than 505! So, yes. wash his hands. If he's getting HI numbers a lot, or a HI is not going down even after treatment (which means insulin, if he doesn't have insulin you need to get to a doctor who does have it). It's time for an emergency visit. I've had the odd HI as I've learned about this D thing, and it's not fun. Feels yucky and you simply can't drink enough water! But mine always were attributed to something obvious. Too much to drink, forgetting insulin, crazy food. things like that. And they always came down within a Continue reading >>

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Grapefruit also has a low glycemic index (GI), around 25, which means it doesn't raise blood sugar as quickly or as much as high-GI foods like white bagel (72) or even a banana (48) or watermelon (72). (The highest GI score is 100.) A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, found that people who ate grapefruit (juice or half a fruit) before a meal had a lower spike in insulin two hours later than those taking a placebo, and fresh grapefruit was associated with less insulin resistance. All 91 patients in the 12-week study were obese, but they did not necessarily have type 2 diabetes. While the results are promising in those without diabetes, blood-sugar reactions to food can vary widely, so if you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, test your blood sugar after eating grapefruit to make sure it can be part of your healthy eating plan. Getty Images Blood sugar is a tricky little beast. Yes, you can get a high reading if you throw caution to the wind and eat several slices of cake at a wedding. The problem is that you can also have a high blood sugar reading if you follow every rule in the type 2 diabetes handbook. That's because it's not just food that affects blood sugar. You could have a cold coming on, or stress may have temporarily boosted your blood sugar. The reading could be wrong, and you need to repeat it. Or it could mean that your medicine is no longer working, and it's time to try a new one. The point is, it's the pattern that matters, not a single reading. Whatever you do, don't feel bad or guilty if you have a high blood sugar reading. A 2004 study found that blood sugar monitoring often amplifies feelings of being a "success" or "failure" at diabetes, and when readings are consistently high, it can trigger feelings of anxiety or self-bla Continue reading >>

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Checking your blood sugar, also called blood glucose, is an important part of diabetes care. This tip sheet tells you: why it helps you to know your blood sugar numbers how to check your blood sugar levels what are target blood sugar levels what to do if your levels are too low or too high how to pay for these tests Why do I need to know my blood sugar numbers? Your blood sugar numbers show how well your diabetes is managed. And managing your diabetes means that you have less chance of having serious health problems, such as kidney disease and vision loss. As you check your blood sugar, you can see what makes your numbers go up and down. For example, you may see that when you are stressed or eat certain foods, your numbers go up. And, you may see that when you take your medicine and are active, your numbers go down. This information lets you know what is working for you and what needs to change. How is blood sugar measured? There are two ways to measure blood sugar. Blood sugar checks that you do yourself. These tell you what your blood sugar level is at the time you test. The A1C (A-one-C) is a test done in a lab or at your provider’s office. This test tells you your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months. How do I check my blood sugar? You use a blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar. This device uses a small drop of blood from your finger to measure your blood sugar level. You can get the meter and supplies in a drug store or by mail. Read the directions that come with your meter to learn how to check your blood sugar. Your health care team also can show you how to use your meter. Write the date, time, and result of the test in your blood sugar record. Take your blood sugar record and meter to each visit and talk about your results with your h Continue reading >>

Average Glucose, Standard Deviation, Cv, And Blood Sugar Variability | Diatribe

Average Glucose, Standard Deviation, Cv, And Blood Sugar Variability | Diatribe

What do these numbers mean, whats the target, and how can they provide insight into better diabetes management? Example days included! Glucose monitoring is one of the most important tools in diabetes. Just like a speedometer in a car, glucose data helps inform key actions in diabetes take more or less medication, change food choices or timing, exercise, and more. Most of us think of glucose data in an immediate sense for guiding therapy decisions: How much insulin should I take right now? However, it also helps inform longer-term patterns: My blood sugar has been consistently high after breakfast for the past two weeks; why might that be and what can be done about it? If you have access to continuous glucose monitoring and ever downloaded your CGM or blood glucose meter ( BGM ), you might have noticed some of the following statistics: Last December, we covered time-in-range in two articles Kelly Close and Adam interviewed 15 experts and then wrote What do experts think about goals? and Adam took a personal look at all his CGM data and wrote, with lots of advice from many of the same experts, Whats an achievable time-in-range goal with diabetes? This article is about the first three statistics: average (mean) glucose, SD, and CV. The information below on mean glucose, SD, and CV is relevant to all readers who monitor their glucose, though its often not available on the device itself you must usually download your meter or CGM to a paired app or computer software. At the end of this article, weve listed options for some of the most commonly used devices. In this piece, weve turned yet again to the experts! This article integrates feedback from a dozen of the worlds smartest thinkers (endocrinologists, educators, researchers) on glucose monitoring and glucose variability Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

Accu-chek Aviva Meter Error Screens | Accu-chek

Accu-chek Aviva Meter Error Screens | Accu-chek

Extreme temperatures. Move the meter to a more temperate area. If you see 3 dashes or hyphens, the meter is not coded or the code key is not inserted. Turn off the meter and make sure the code key is properly inserted. If this does not fix the problem, please contact Accu-Chek Customer Care . A battery icon means the battery power is low. Change the battery soon. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 7, "Changing the Batteries." A battery icon means the battery power is low. Change the battery soon. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 5, "Changing the Battery." "Set-up" means the meter is in the set-up mode, waiting for you to change or confirm settings. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 5, "Using the Set-Up Mode." "Set" means the meter is in set mode, waiting for you to change or confirm settings. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 4, "Meter Setup." If you see "code exp," the test strips expire at the end of the current month. Make sure the time and date in the meter are correct. If this does not fix the problem, please contact Accu-Chek Customer Care . If a test strip icon is flashing, the meter is ready for you to insert a test strip. If you see a blood drop and test strip, the meter is ready for a drop of blood or control solution. If you see the letters HI, your blood glucose may be higher than the measuring range of the system. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 4, "Unusual Blood Glucose Results." If you see the letters LO, your blood glucose may be lower than the measuring range of the system. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 4, "Unusual Blood Glucose Results." A star or asterisk means a marker was assigned to this test result. A star or asterisk mean Continue reading >>

Checked Glucose And My Meter Says Hi....! What!?... Predisone Trouble??

Checked Glucose And My Meter Says Hi....! What!?... Predisone Trouble??

Checked glucose and my meter says HI....! WHAT!?... Predisone trouble?? I have had a a1c range from 6.1 to 7.3 for about 1--1/2 years....trying to do the natural thing ya know. I check my level off and on and usually only had higher readings in the morning hours. After this past spring and summer vacations I started to check my readings and was finding much higher than normal readings....150 to 250....at varying times. Well....My dr.. gave me metformin to have on hand when I felt ready to start using the meds as I dont like taking meds. Very good patient doctor relationship we have. When the higher numbers started it made me very uncomfortable....so I gave in and started the metoformon at 500mg hcl...and it did slowly start to give me better numbers as I moved up to 2x500 extended release per day with meals. Managing overall....all things considered....very, very well. I still plan on losing weight and hopefully will be able to go off meds and manage things in a healthier state. Currently I run about 285 pounds and even though people say " I carry it well" ....well it isn't staying....lol. SO....this week is prime apple picking....pumkin....time of year.....and I wandered off my mainstay diet a pinch....my favorite glucose control meal is cheese burgers and brussel sprouts....no kidding it works great for me.... SO.....THIS PAST WEEK I WAS PUT ON PREDNISONE....at 60mg....a day for 7days....and then a taper off for 5days.....for a bit of inflamation in my right ear. The effects of the prednisone were brought to my attention....but I persuaded that I didn't feel I would be a candidate for issues due to my lower a1c....so I thought....and so I was given and took the prednisone. I was so busy this past week with some time off...right....that I hadn't checked my numbers.... Continue reading >>

High Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

High Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

What is high blood glucose? People who do not have diabetes typically have fasting plasma blood glucose levels that run under 126 mg/dl. Your physician will define for you what your target blood glucose should be — identifying a blood glucose target that is as close to normal as possible that you can safely achieve given your overall medical health. In general, high blood glucose, also called 'hyperglycemia', is considered "high" when it is 160 mg/dl or above your individual blood glucose target. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider what he or she thinks is a safe target for you for blood glucose before and after meals. If your blood glucose runs high for long periods of time, this can pose significant problems for you long-term — increased risk of complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks and strokes and more. High blood glucose can pose health problems in the short-term as well. Your treatment plan may need adjustment if the blood glucose stays over 180 mg/dl for 3 days in a row. It is important to aim to keep your blood glucose under control, and treat hyperglycemia when it occurs. What are the symptoms of high blood glucose? Increased thirst Increased urination Dry mouth or skin Tiredness or fatigue Blurred vision More frequent infections Slow healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss What causes high blood glucose? Too much food Too little exercise or physical activity Skipped or not enough diabetes pills or insulin Insulin that has spoiled after being exposed to extreme heat or freezing cold Stress, illness, infection, injury or surgery A blood glucose meter that is not reading accurately What should you do for high blood glucose? Be sure to drink plenty of water. It is recommended to drink a minimum of 8 glasses each day. If yo Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Readings: What They Mean

Blood Glucose Readings: What They Mean

Source: Web exclusive: June 2011 When you have diabetes, perhaps the most important thing you need to know is the level of your blood glucose, also known as your blood sugar. Since many factors can raise or lower your blood glucose, you may have to check it several times a day. But once you obtain a blood glucose reading, what exactly does it mean? Crunch those numbers When you test a drop of your blood with a glucose meter, the big number that pops onto the screen refers to the number of millimoles (mmol) of glucose per litre (L) of your blood. A millimole (mmol) is one-thousandth of a mole, which is a standard unit for measuring the mass of molecules. And if that’s not already confusing enough, the United States uses a completely different system than Canadians for measuring blood glucose. South of the border, blood glucose is measured in milligrams per decilitre (mg/dL). This can sometimes be rather bewildering, especially if you’re brand new to diabetes and researching your disease on the Internet. “I tell people to go to a Canadian site first,” says Tabitha Palmer, a certified diabetes educator at the Centre for Clinical Research in Halifax. Know your targets So what numbers should you be looking for? Your target reading before meals should be between 4 and 7. Your blood sugar normally spikes two hours after a meal, so between 5 and 10 is a good range after you eat. Besides food, other factors that can cause your blood sugar to go up or down include exercise, illness, medications and stress. Your blood glucose readings are hands-down the best way to monitor whether or not your diabetes is generally well managed. "They really help the physicians and educators if we’re trying to look at whether you need to have your medication, insulin or mealtime adjusted, Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Most people with diabetes need to check their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. The results help you and your doctor manage those levels, which helps you avoid diabetes complications. There are several ways to test your blood sugar: From Your Fingertip: You prick your finger with a small, sharp needle (called a lancet) and put a drop of blood on a test strip. Then you put the test strip into a meter that shows your blood sugar level. You get results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. Some meters can tell you your average blood sugar level over a period of time and show you charts and graphs of your past test results. You can get blood sugar meters and strips at your local pharmacy. Meters That Test Other Sites: Newer meters let you test sites other than your fingertip, such as your upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. You may get different results than from your fingertip. Blood sugar levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other testing sites. This is especially true when your blood sugar is rapidly changing, like after a meal or after exercise. If you are checking your sugar when you have symptoms of hypoglycemia, you should use your fingertip if possible, because these readings will be more accurate. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System: These devices, also called interstitial glucose measuring devices, are combined with insulin pumps. They are similar to finger-stick glucose results and can show patterns and trends in your results over time. You may need to check your blood sugar several times a day, such as before meals or exercise, at bedtime, before driving, and when you think your blood sugar levels are low. Everyone is different, so ask your doctor when and how often you should chec Continue reading >>

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