diabetestalk.net

What Does It Mean To Have Glucose In Your Urine?

Urine Glucose Test

Urine Glucose Test

What Is a Urine Glucose Test? A urine glucose test is a quick and simple way to check for abnormally high levels of glucose in the urine. Glucose is a type of sugar that your body requires and uses for energy. Your body converts the carbohydrates you eat into glucose. Having too much glucose in your body can be a sign of a health problem. If you don’t receive treatment and your glucose levels remain high, you can develop serious complications. The test involves taking a sample of urine. Once you provide your sample, a small cardboard device known as a dipstick will measure your glucose levels. The dipstick will change color depending on the amount of glucose in your urine. If you have a moderate or high amount of glucose in your urine, your doctor will perform further testing to determine the underlying cause. The most common cause of elevated glucose levels is diabetes, a condition that affects the body’s ability to manage glucose levels. It’s important to monitor your glucose levels if you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, or if you show symptoms of prediabetes. These symptoms include excessive thirst, blurred vision, and fatigue. When left untreated, diabetes can lead to long-term complications, including kidney failure and nerve damage. A urine glucose test is often performed to check for diabetes. In addition, known diabetics can use the urine glucose test as a way of monitoring the degree of sugar control, or efficacy of treatments. Urine tests were once the main type of testing used to measure glucose levels in people who may have diabetes. However, they are far less common now that blood tests have become more accurate and easier to use. In some cases, a urine glucose test may also be done to check for kidney problems or a urinary tract infection. Continue reading >>

Glycosuria (glucose In Urine) Symptoms, Causes, And Potential Complications

Glycosuria (glucose In Urine) Symptoms, Causes, And Potential Complications

Glycosuria, or glucose in the urine, is the presence of higher than normal levels of sugar in the urine and may be due to complications with your kidneys or diabetes. To learn more about this condition, including symptoms, causes, and prevention strategies, as well as what normal and abnormal levels of glucose in the urine are, continue reading. Glycosuria symptoms Glycosuria may occur with a host of other symptoms, including excessive hunger, fatigue, infections, frequent urination, irritability, increased thirst, issues with vision, slower healing of wounds, tingling sensation in hands and feet, unexplained weight loss, abdominal pain, and in some cases, high blood sugar levels. Difference between blood glucose and glucose in urine Blood glucose is regulated by insulin produced by the pancreas, though in patients with diabetes, the insulin is not produced or processed properly meaning they may need insulin injections to regulate their blood sugar. If left unmanaged, diabetes can cause blood glucose levels to rise and some may enter into the urine. Urine glucose may not always be due to diabetes, and can be a benign symptom that sometimes accompanies pregnancy. Glucose in urine causes Some of the most common causes of glucose in the urine include: Diabetes mellitus: The excess blood glucose levels of people with unmanaged diabetes make it difficult for your kidneys to properly reabsorb the glucose and can cause it to leak into the urine. Hyperthyroidism: Excessive thyroid hormones can cause decreased absorption of glucose that is then passed out of the body through the urine. High sugar diet: Consuming excessive sugar can raise your blood glucose past the level that your kidneys can properly reabsorb, which causes some glucose to be passed into the urine. Benign glycos Continue reading >>

Glucose In Urine Test

Glucose In Urine Test

What is a Glucose in Urine Test? A glucose in urine test measures the amount of glucose in your urine. Glucose is a type of sugar. It is your body's main source of energy. A hormone called insulin helps move glucose from your bloodstream into your cells. If too much glucose gets into the blood, the extra glucose will be eliminated through your urine. A urine glucose test can be used to help determine if blood glucose levels are too high, which may be a sign of diabetes. Other names: urine sugar test; urine glucose test; glucosuria test What is it used for? A glucose in urine test may be part of a urinalysis, a test that measures different cells, chemicals, and other substances in your urine. Urinalysis is often included as part of a routine exam. A glucose in urine test may also be used to screen for diabetes. However, a urine glucose test is not as accurate as a blood glucose test. It may be ordered if blood glucose testing is difficult or not possible. Some people can't get blood drawn because their veins are too small or too scarred from repeated punctures. Other people avoid blood tests due to extreme anxiety or fear of needles. Why do I need a glucose in urine test? You may get a glucose in urine test as part of your regular checkup or if you have symptoms of diabetes and cannot take a blood glucose test. Symptoms of diabetes include: You may also need a urinalysis, which includes a glucose in urine test, if you are pregnant. If high levels of glucose in urine are found, it may indicate gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is form of diabetes that happens only during pregnancy. Blood glucose testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Most pregnant women are tested for gestational diabetes with a blood glucose test, between their 24th Continue reading >>

Urine Sugar Levels Chart, What Does Sugar In Urine Mean?

Urine Sugar Levels Chart, What Does Sugar In Urine Mean?

what does it mean to have glucose in your urine if you are child, man, or woman? Should the one concerned about sugar in his/her urine? Does maple colored urine indicate sugar in urine? Please be patient and read carefully, comment with your question if you cannot find answer. What does glucosuria means? Medical term for sugar in the urine is Glycosuria or glucosuria, it is the excretion of excessive blood glucose into the urine filtrate. Is it normal to have sugar in your urine Ordinarily, urine contains no glucose because the kidneys are able to reclaim all of the filtered glucose back into the bloodstream. When you find a positive urine test for glucose, it means you have high level of sugar in your blood. What does too much glucose in urine mean? You can see glucose in your urine after the glucose in your blood exceeds 162 – 180 mg/dl which is the normal glucose threshold of the kidney. excess glucose in urine is usually not a healthy concern, and of course there is nothing to call it the normal glucose levels in urinalysis. sugar in the urine in diabetes mellitus type 2: the kidney cannot deal with great amount of sugar which increased above the normal threshold of glucose, and excrete it in the urinary fluid. In case of type 1 diabetes mellitus, the sugar drop in the urine as well as ketone bodies or “Acetone” in urine, the reasons behind acetone in urine is the consumption of fatty acids in the body to produce energy when the glucose is not available, remember that glucose in case of DM voided regularly through the urination while the body organs need the sugar for energy. Blood Sugar levels chart. 1+ glucose in urine test, is it normal? Even trace sugar in the urine is not clinically normal, 1+ means that the serum glucose is above 180 mg/dl and the urine Continue reading >>

Sugar In Urine

Sugar In Urine

What is sugar in urine? Sugar (glucose) is usually present in the urine at very low levels or not at all. Abnormally high amounts of sugar in the urine, known as glycosuria, are usually the result of high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar usually occurs in diabetes, especially when untreated. Normally, when blood is filtered in the kidneys, some sugar remains in the fluid that will later become urine. If the level of blood sugar is low, as is normally the case, the body can reabsorb the sugar from this fluid before it leaves the kidney to be excreted as urine. When the blood sugar is high, there is too much sugar in the fluid leaving the kidney to be reabsorbed, so some sugar passes into the urine. Sugar in the urine can be detected in the laboratory or is easy to detect at home with a urine dipstick test. Because sugar in the urine is associated with high blood sugar and diabetes, it is important to consult a physician if you suspect you have sugar in your urine. Sugar in the urine is often accompanied by other symptoms of diabetes, including fatigue, unexplained weight loss, excessive thirst or hunger, and frequent urination. Seek immediate medical care (call 911) if you have sugar in the urine along with more serious symptoms, including the inability to think clearly. Seek prompt medical care if your sugar in the urine is persistent or causes you concern. Continue reading >>

Sugar In Urine But Not In Blood

Sugar In Urine But Not In Blood

You can have your blood sugar and urine sugar levels checked when going to the doctor for a regular blood work and urine sample test or check these levels yourself at home using a blood glucose meter and urine glucose strips. If you have diabetes, regularly monitoring your sugar levels can help you determine whether your treatment plan is adequate or require adjustments. If you find that you have sugar in your urine, it is a sign that your sugar levels are excessively high. Consult with your physician promptly. Video of the Day Under normal circumstances, you do not have sugar in your urine. Historically, physicians diagnosed diabetes by tasting the patient's urine to determine its sweetness, documented by Thomas Willis in the 17th century. Sugar in your urine, or glycosuria, only occurs if your blood sugar levels exceed a certain threshold. It is a sign that your body is struggling to keep your blood sugar levels under control by trying to get rid of the sugar in your urine. If your diabetes is well controlled, you should not have sugar in your urine. Sugar in Blood It is impossible not to have sugar in your blood. The body tightly regulates the amount of sugar, or glucose, you have in your blood to have energy available at all times to your body cells. A healthy person has fasting blood sugar levels of below 100 mg/dL, while levels up to 125 mg/dL indicate prediabetes and 126 mg/dL indicate full-blown diabetes. If your blood sugar levels drop below 70 mg/dL, you can experience symptoms of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, and may even have seizures, pass out or die if nothing is done to correct your low blood sugar. However, although your blood sugar levels may get low, your blood sugar levels will never reach zero. Sugar in Urine but not in Blood If your urine sugar Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Urine Test For Sugar - Topic Overview

Diabetes: Urine Test For Sugar - Topic Overview

Sugar (glucose) normally is not found in urine. But when blood sugar levels rise well above a target range-which can occur in type 1 and type 2 diabetes-the kidneys often release some of the excess sugar from the blood into the urine. In pregnant women, the kidneys sometimes release sugar into the urine even when blood sugar levels are within a safe range. You can test urine for sugar by using plastic strips you can buy at a pharmacy. You dip a strip into a urine sample. The strip changes color to show how much sugar is in the sample. You compare the resulting color to a chart of colors. Each color indicates a level of glucose. Urine testing for sugar is not an accurate way to measure how much sugar is in your blood. So most doctors no longer recommend it for people who have diabetes. A sample of urine often is stored in your bladder for several hours before you test it. Also, because sugar does not show up in urine until it is much higher than normal in the bloodstream (180 mg/dL), urine cannot be used to check for slightly high or low blood sugar levels. Continue reading >>

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Urine tests provide your doctor or midwife with important information about diseases or conditions that could potentially affect you or your growing baby. That's why at each prenatal visit, you'll be asked to give a urine sample as part of your regular exam. This sample is used to help determine if you have diabetes, kidney disease, or a bladder infection by measuring the levels of sugar, protein, bacteria, or other substances in your urine. The test is routine and painless and could prevent a lot of trouble down the road. What does a urine test involve? Urine can be collected any time of day. You will most likely be given a sterile cup to collect a sample before your exam. Before urinating, use a sterile towelette to wipe your genitals from front to back, and then release a small amount of urine into the toilet -- this prevents the sample from being contaminated with bacteria or other secretions that may invalidate the results. Put the container in your urine stream, and collect at least one to two ounces. This sample is then checked with chemically treated testing strips or sticks, and the results are usually available right away. If more analysis is necessary, your urine may be sent to a lab for additional assessment. What can a urine test detect? Sugar Typically, there is very little or no sugar (glucose) in urine during pregnancy. But when blood sugar levels in the body are too high, excess sugar can end up in the urine. This can be seen with gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that only develops during pregnancy. It occurs when pregnancy hormones disrupt the body's ability to use insulin, a chemical that turns blood sugar into energy. A doctor often orders a blood test for diabetes early in your pregnancy if he or she knows you have other risk factors, like a Continue reading >>

Does Sugar In My Urine Mean I Have Diabetes?

Does Sugar In My Urine Mean I Have Diabetes?

Question: I went to my Doctor for general check up, and mentioned frequent urination, and a feeling that my bladder was full. I thought I may have urinary tract infection. Urine sample revealed sugar in urine although my blood was only 7.5 mmo/L nearly two hours after a breakfast of Special K. I am scheduled for a fasting blood sugar. I would be very grateful if you could advise me whether sugar can be present in urine for reasons other than diabetes and also if there is a link between having underactive thyroid and developing diabetes? Thank you, Answer: Hello Kate! You ask good questions and have astute observation! The most common cause of sugar in the urine, by far, is the presence of diabetes mellitus. There is other potential cause for sugar in the urine which includes the use of certain drugs that may increase urine glucose measurements; and renal glycosuria which is a rare condition in which glucose is excreted in the urine, even when blood glucose levels are normal or low, due to improper functioning of the renal tubules in the kidneys. Fasting blood glucose levels in the 5.5 to 7 mmol/L range (100 to126 mg/dl), and blood glucose levels two hours following an oral glucose tolerance test in the 7.7 to 11.11 mmol/L range (140 to 200 mg/dl) are considered Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) and are indicative of Pre-Diabetes. Your blood glucose reading of 7.5 mmol/L two hours following a light meal of Special-K (most likely a lesser glucose load than a glucose tolerance test involves) would therefore raise concern that you may have Pre-Diabetes or Diabetes. And sugar in the urine is not indicative of the actual blood glucose level at time of a urine test, but rather of blood glucose levels prior to the time of sampling . . . perhaps in the early AM hours when blood g Continue reading >>

Urine Glucose Test

Urine Glucose Test

Test for glycosuria, the excretion of glucose in the urine. The test for urine glucose uses a small dipstick that changes color after it has been dipped in urine. Matching the color on the dipstick against a chart on the test package reveals whether there is glucose in the urine. Before people with diabetes started measuring blood glucose levels, urine glucose testing was the best way to monitor diabetes control. Some people still use urine glucose tests, but these tests are of dubious value in monitoring diabetes control for two reasons. First, the renal threshold — the blood glucose level at which the kidneys begin to excrete glucose in the urine — is relatively high. In healthy, nondiabetic individuals, the average renal threshold is at a blood glucose level of 160–180 mg/dl. In other words, only when the blood glucose level reaches 160–180 mg/dl will some glucose appear in the urine. Many people with diabetes have an even higher renal threshold, so glucose will not appear in their urine until blood glucose levels are very high — well above the normal range. Thus, a positive urine glucose test would indicate that the blood glucose level is very high, and a negative urine glucose test could mean that the level is low, normal, or slightly elevated. The second factor that limits the value of this test is that urine can remain in the bladder for several hours, which means that a positive urine glucose test may actually reflect a high blood glucose level from several hours ago, even if the current blood glucose level is actually normal. Continue reading >>

Glycosuria

Glycosuria

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. Glycosuria is the term for glucose present in urine, in amounts that can be detected by the usual techniques. Pathogenesis Virtually all the glucose that is filtered through the glomeruli is reabsorbed by the proximal renal tubule and so glycosuria represents an abnormal state. The amount of glucose not reabsorbed by the kidneys is usually less than 0.1%. Adults excrete about 65 mg of glucose per day and standard techniques do not detect this level. There are two basic causes of glycosuria. One is that the level of blood glucose is so high that the renal tubules are unable to reabsorb all that is presented. The other is a failure of the tubules to reabsorb all glucose at a level where this should be possible. The latter is called renal glycosuria. The level of blood glucose at which it spills into the urine is called the renal threshold. Under normal circumstances this is around 10 mmol/L. Diastix®, Medi-Test® and Mission Glucose® are plastic strips carrying glucose oxidase and a colour indicator, usually o-toluidine. They are specific and unlikely to give positive results for substances other than glucose. Glucose oxidase strips have superseded older reagents for reducing substances. Elevated blood glucose If glycosuria occurs because a normal renal threshold has been exceeded, this is usually indicative of impaired glucose tolerance or frank diabetes. It can occur in a person who doesn't have diabetes if a substantial amount of food high in sugar is Continue reading >>

Glucose — Urine

Glucose — Urine

Definition The glucose urine test measures the amount of sugar (glucose) in a urine sample. The presence of glucose in the urine is called glycosuria or glucosuria. Glucose level can also be measured using a blood test or a cerebrospinal fluid test. Alternative Names Urine sugar test; Urine glucose test; Glucosuria test; Glycosuria test How the Test is Performed After you provide a urine sample, it is tested right away. The health care provider uses a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The color the dipstick changes to tells the provider the level of glucose in your urine. If needed, your provider may ask you to collect your urine at home over 24 hours. Your provider will tell you how to do this. Follow instructions exactly so that the results are accurate. How to Prepare for the Test Certain medicines can change the result of this test. Before the test, tell your provider which medicines you are taking. Do not stop taking any medicine before talking to your provider. How the Test will Feel The test involves only normal urination. There is no discomfort. Why the Test is Performed This test was commonly used to test for and monitor diabetes in the past. Now, blood tests to measure glucose level in the blood are easy to do and are used instead of the glucose urine test. The glucose urine test may be ordered when the doctor suspects renal glycosuria. This is a rare condition in which glucose is released from the kidneys into the urine, even when the blood glucose level is normal. Normal Results Glucose is not usually found in urine. If it is, further testing is needed. Normal glucose range in urine: 0 to 0.8 mmol/l (0 to 15 mg/dL) The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories Continue reading >>

Sugar (glucose) In Urine Meaning, Causes, Readings

Sugar (glucose) In Urine Meaning, Causes, Readings

Home Kidneys and Urinary Tract Sugar (Glucose) in Urine Meaning, Causes, Readings Sugar (Glucose) in Urine Meaning, Causes, Readings The urine is composed of a number of different substances including nutrients, salts and wastes. It is the bodys way of expelling what it does not need and maintaining a state of balance known as homeostasis. When there is any disease or disorder in the body, it may at times be detectable through changes in the composition of urine. The presence of glucose is one such abnormality. Very small amounts of glucose is present in the urine under normal circumstances. It is usually trace amounts that is unlikely to be detected with tests like urine dipstick. When sugar (glucose) is detected in the urine (glycosuria) it means that sufficient amounts are present in the urine to trigger a positive result on the testing method. This is usually abnormal, especially if it is very high, persistent and not linked to any event, condition or medication. The presence of sugar in the urine is most likely related to one of two mechanisms: The blood sugar levels are very high and the normally small amounts of glucose in the urine are therefore significantly higher. The kidney is diseased or damaged and the normal filtering of blood to form urine is malfunctioning. In this case there may be a number of abnormalities detectable in urine apart from the high glucose level. It is also possible that the urine or testing medium could have been contaminated or tainted. While the result may be accurate, it is not indicative of an abnormality within the body. The normal level of glucose in the urine ranges from 0 to 0.8 mmol/l (0 to 15 mg/dL). Any reading above these upper limits is considered as glycosuria. However, the specific results should be discussed with a doct Continue reading >>

Clinical Significance Of Glucose In The Urine

Clinical Significance Of Glucose In The Urine

In a healthy individual, almost all of the glucose filtered by the renal glomerulus is reabsorbed in the proximal convoluted tubule. The amount of glucose reabsorbed by the proximal tubule is determined by the body's need to maintain a sufficient level of glucose in the blood. If the concentration of blood glucose becomes too high (160-180 mg/dL), the tubules no longer reabsorb glucose, allowing it to pass through into the urine. It is important to note that glucose may appear in the urine of healthy individuals after consuming a meal that is high in glucose. Fasting prior to providing a sample for screening eliminates this problem. Conditions in which glucose levels in the urine are above 100 mg/dL and detectable include: diabetes mellitus and other endocrine disorders impaired tubular reabsorption due to advanced kidney disease pregnancy - glycosuria developing in the 3rd trimester may be due to latent diabetes mellitus central nervous system damage pancreatic disease disturbances of metabolism such as, burns, infection or fractures Continue reading >>

Glycosuria

Glycosuria

Glycosuria or glucosuria is the excretion of glucose into the urine. Ordinarily, urine contains no glucose because the kidneys are able to reabsorb all of the filtered glucose from the tubular fluid back into the bloodstream. Glycosuria is nearly always caused by elevated blood glucose levels, most commonly due to untreated diabetes mellitus. Rarely, glycosuria is due to an intrinsic problem with glucose reabsorption within the kidneys (such as Fanconi syndrome), producing a condition termed renal glycosuria.[1] Glycosuria leads to excessive water loss into the urine with resultant dehydration, a process called osmotic diuresis. Alimentary glycosuria is a temporary condition, when a high amount of carbohydrate is taken, it is rapidly absorbed in some cases where a part of the stomach is surgically removed, the excessive glucose appears in urine producing glucosuria. Pathophysiology[edit] Blood is filtered by millions of nephrons, the functional units that comprise the kidneys. In each nephron, blood flows from the arteriole into the glomerulus, a tuft of leaky capillaries. The Bowman's capsule surrounds each glomerulus, and collects the filtrate that the glomerulus forms. The filtrate contains waste products (e.g. urea), electrolytes (e.g. sodium, potassium, chloride), amino acids, and glucose. The filtrate passes into the renal tubules of the kidney. In the first part of the renal tubule, the proximal tubule, glucose is reabsorbed from the filtrate, across the tubular epithelium and into the bloodstream. The proximal tubule can only reabsorb a limited amount of glucose. When the blood glucose level exceeds about 160 – 180 mg/dl, the proximal tubule becomes overwhelmed and begins to excrete glucose in the urine. Approximate correlation between dipstick designation and Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar