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What Does A Blood Sugar Level Of 112 Mean?

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

What Does (u.s. Units). Fasting Blood Sugar 112 And H1a1c 5.3 Mean

What Does (u.s. Units). Fasting Blood Sugar 112 And H1a1c 5.3 Mean

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community What does (u.s. units). fasting blood sugar 112 and H1A1c 5.3 mean yetta2mymom Don't have diabetes Well-Known Member My primary care physician does not know what is the implied average blood sugar for an H1A1c of 5.3 (% I assume) means. I am under the impression that my fasting blood sugar taken at the same time as 112 (U.S. units) is probably nearly as high or higher than the average blood sugar for H1A1c of 5.3. Do you have an approximate conversion for H1A1c to average blood sugar in u.s. units? Any explanation for these strange results. I live on a very low carb diet to control my form of reactive hypoglycemia but these results are puzzling. There should be enough unit converters around the site to work it out but it may take more than one step. Your 112 US (mg/dL) seems to be 6.2 UK (mmol/L) So your fasting BG is in line with your HbA1c of 5.3%. Remember that your fasting BG can be higher than your average BG if your liver has dumped some glucose into your blood during your fasting period. People expect the fasting reading to be the lowest of the day, but it isn't always. The numbers do not seem inconsistent, especially if you spend some of the day running low BG due to your RH. I assume that you are testing some of the time to help manage your RH? yetta2mymom Don't have diabetes Well-Known Member There should be enough unit converters around the site to work it out but it may take more than one step. Your 112 US (mg/dL) seems to be 6.2 UK (mmol/L) So your fasting BG is in line with your HbA1c of 5.3%. Remember that your fasting BG can be higher than your average BG if your liver has dumped some glucose into your blood during your fasting period. Continue reading >>

Glucose: The Silent Killer

Glucose: The Silent Killer

The deadly effects of even slightly elevated glucose are fatally misunderstood. One reason for this calamity is physicians who continue to rely on obsolete blood glucose ranges. These doctors fail to recognize that any excess glucose creates lethal metabolic pathologies that are underlying factors behind multiple age-related diseases. People today thus suffer and die from diabetic-like complications without knowing their blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high! Life Extension® long ago argued that most aging people have elevated blood glucose. Our controversial position has been vindicated as mainstream medicine consistently lowers the upper-level threshold of acceptable (safe) fasting blood glucose. As new evidence accumulates, it has become abundantly clear that maturing individuals need to take aggressive actions to ensure their fasting and after-meal glucose levels are kept in safe ranges. Glucose Is Like Gasoline Our body’s primary source of energy is glucose. All of our cells use it, and when there is not enough glucose available, our body shuts down in a similar way that a car engine stops when the gasoline tank is empty. When glucose is properly utilized, our cells produce energy efficiently. As cellular sensitivity to insulin diminishes, excess glucose accumulates in our bloodstream. Like spilled gasoline, excess blood glucose creates a highly combustible environment from which oxidative and inflammatory fires chronically erupt. Excess glucose not used for energy production converts to triglycerides that are either stored as unwanted body fat or accumulate in the blood where they contribute to the formation of atherosclerotic plaque.1-6 If you were filling your automobile with gasoline and the tank reached full, you would not keep pumping in more gas. Yet Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

Thank you for visiting my website! If you need help lowering your blood sugar level, check out my books at Amazon or Smashwords. If you’re outside of the U.S., Smashwords may be the best source. —Steve Parker, M.D. * * * Physicians focus so much on disease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.94 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l). What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2010 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.11 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.28 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate) ♦ ♦ ♦ Ranges of blood sugar for young healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.94 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. ♦ ♦ ♦ What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinol Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Below chart displays possible blood sugar levels (in fasting state). Units are expressed in mg/dL and mmol/L respectively. Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes You can also download or print this chart by clicking here. Reference: American Diabetes Association, Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? What is normal blood sugar level? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Cont.----a1c Showed 112--average For 3 Months

Blood Sugar Cont.----a1c Showed 112--average For 3 Months

Blood sugar cont.----A1C showed 112--average for 3 months That was not just one reading at a certain timeof the day. I do lots of water aerobics and I thought I was eating the right foods. The nurse said even if I eat the right foods, if I eat too much that is not healthy. Darn! So...could someone who knows more than me explain how quantity effects the blood sugar? I don't know what the A1C number was. I did not know enough to ask the doctor. Maybe the 112 was the basting blood sugar in the morning when they did the test. I found this about a man who had 112 blood sugar. He says he does lots of exercise, is 25 lbs. overweight, and eats very healthy. The quote is the answer to him. "Your A1c is excellent, just fasting glucose is a bit high slightly based on WHO standard (up to 110 mg/dl), but quite a bit by ADA standard (up to 100 mg/dl). So you are in a good shape. To take care of your slightly increased glucose, just keep up doing the exercises. If it persists, perhaps you can do a clinical test to determine which organ goes wrong handling glucose, is it the liver producing too much glucose (liver insulin resistance) or the muscle taking up glucose too slowly (muscle insulin resistance)? Or is insulin low? Then your doctor may prescribe the appropriate medications to treat the source problem." I guess I need to ask the doctor these questions, huh? I am now really vurious about the A1C number. They actually did not tell me that. Continue reading >>

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

A fasting blood sugar test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood after you have not eaten for at least eight hours. Checking for an ideal fasting blood sugar is one of the most commonly performed tests to check for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. So what should your fasting blood sugar be? The normal blood sugar range is 65-99 mg/dL. If your fasting blood sugar is between 100 and 125 mg/dL, you have “impaired fasting glucose,” also referred to as “prediabetes.” If your fasting blood sugar is more than 126 mg/dL on two or more occasions, you have full-blown diabetes. What Is Prediabetes? People defined as having impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are individuals whose blood sugar levels do not meet criteria for diabetes, yet are higher than those considered normal. These people are at relatively high risk for the future development of diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), prediabetes is not a disease itself but rather a risk factor “for diabetes as well as cardiovascular disease.”[1] However, the ADA also state that prediabetes can be considered an “intermediate stage” in the diabetes disease process.[1](One might wonder how prediabetes can be a both a risk factor for diabetes and an intermediate stage of the diabetes disease process simultaneously). In addition to increasing the chance of developing diabetes, it’s well-established that people with impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are more likely to be overweight or obese, especially with what’s known as abdominal or visceral obesity. They also are more likely to have high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension.[1] Even Normal-Range Blood Glucose Levels Can Increase Diabetes Risk There’s a lot more at stake for thos Continue reading >>

How I Reversed My Diabetes In 60 Days

How I Reversed My Diabetes In 60 Days

Does a fasting glucose of 112 indicate prediabetes? Here is my answer to this question posed in another forum. The fasting blood glucose cutoff for diabetes is 125. Normal maximum currently is 100. It used to be 125, then it was lowered to 115 and then 110. And finally to 100. Today, a reading in the range of 100-125 is called by various names: Impaired Glucose Tolerance, Insulin Resistant, Prediabetic, etc. For a non-diabetic, the fasting blood glucose number is generally very low. Even if the non-diabetic has eaten a lot of carbs in their last meal the previous day, the FBG in a lab will be low 100. In my own case, as I looked at my blood test reports from physicals I had had each year for the 15 years before I was diagnosed, I saw a clear trend in the FBG creeping up ever so slowly. 1. Ask for a second FBG test in a different lab, if possible. And if the reading is in the 100 - 125 range and depending on your age, blood pressure, cholestrol conditions which cause what is known as the metabolic syndrome, you may be pre-diabetic. In which case, you should take all actions required to control diabetes through diet and exercise and "cut it off at the pass" . 2. Take comfort in the fact that your post-prandial readings are so good. You have not crossed over into the realm of diabetics. This is a more telling test, in my opinion, of your current condition. Again, going from personal experience, the body's inability to process carbs efficiently and the body's cells' inability to accept glucose via insulin - both these abilities decrease gradually and when diabetic controls are compromised, the post-meal readings - the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test is a proxy for post-meal sugar control assessment - leave no doubt at all. In other words, if you were diabetic, all your OGTT re Continue reading >>

High Morning Blood Sugar

High Morning Blood Sugar

by Mary (Sacramento, Ca.) QUESTION: I can go to bed at night and my blood sugar is 112 but in the morning its 157 and when I fast it goes up..why?? ANSWER: Hi Mary, To give an exact answer to your question, I need to know if you're a diabetic or not, your age and some of your lifestyle habits and foods you use to eat. Anyway, although I don't have all these information, I will try to give an explanation to your morning high blood sugar. If you think you're not a diabetic, you shouldn't exclude the possibility you might have diabetes. Here's what happens: If you go to bed with normal blood sugar levels, during night (exactly early in the morning 4-5 am) there are some substances (hormones) our body produces to wake us up. They are called "stress" hormones, which raise blood sugar levels. In a normal person, this rise is accompanied with increase in insulin levels too. As a consequence, a normal person is woken up without having high blood glucose. In a diabetic, this doesn't happen, especially for type 2 diabetics. Their body still produces a little of insulin, but the insulin is not able to transport the glucose inside the body cells. Thus, glucose remains in the bloodstream and diabetics they wake up with high blood sugar levels and high insulin levels (induced by high blood sugar). What you can do, you may check again your fasting blood sugar levels, do an oral glucose tolerance test and check your A1C level in a lab. In this way you'll make sure if you have diabetes or not and what precautions you must take. Hope I answered your question. Take care! Dr.Alba High Sugar level at the morning by: Anonymous COMMENT: I have the same problem, before bed, it is normal but when wake up in the morning, the blood sugar level rasies up to 144. I am not taking any medicine and th Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

Blood sugar control is a main goal for people living with type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar levels can lead to a variety of complications over time, including nerve damage, heart disease, and vision problems. Blood sugar levels that are too low can cause more immediate problems, such as dizziness, confusion, and potentially a loss of consciousness. Keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible is key to preventing these complications and living well with type 2 diabetes. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Glucose, or blood sugar, comes from two places — the food you eat and your liver. “Blood sugar is basically used to supply energy to the body,” explains Deborah Jane Wexler, MD, an endocrinologist in practice at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. For instance, one of your most valued organs — your brain — runs entirely on glucose, she notes. Insulin is used to move glucose into cells to be used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the blood, leading to high blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar can occur when you take too much diabetes medication, skip a meal, or increase your physical activity. Monitoring your blood sugar — by making sure it doesn’t spike too high or dip too low — is an important part of managing your type 2 diabetes. And you can start by learning the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and steps to take to bring those levels back to normal: Hypoglycemia: If blood sugar is too low — usually below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — you may have symptoms such as confusion, sweating, nervousness, nausea, and dizziness. You could even pass out Continue reading >>

Drsugar Answers: Prediabetes And Blood Sugar Struggles

Drsugar Answers: Prediabetes And Blood Sugar Struggles

DrSugar Answers: Prediabetes and Blood Sugar Struggles Chat with us on Facebook Messenger. Learn what's trending across POPSUGAR. 12 Breakfast Smoothie Bowl Recipes That Are Almost Too Pretty to Eat DrSugar Answers: Prediabetes and Blood Sugar Struggles Chat with us on Facebook Messenger. Learn what's trending across POPSUGAR. DrSugar is in the house and he's answering your health questions. I was diagnosed last year with prediabetes. I'm 32, caucasian, and have a BMI of 22. I do a variety of exercise, including 30 to 60 minutes of running, climbing stairs, and weightlifting at least five days a week. I've had healthy eating habits (high fiber, low fat, low added sugar, whole grains, low glycemic index foods, etc.) for years. My only risk factor seems to be genetic. My fasting blood glucose levels, however, are steadily creeping higher and are now in the middle of the "prediabetes" range at 112 mg/dL. My last HbA1c level was at six percent. I'm at a loss for what else I can do to help keep my blood sugar from rising further. My doctor just tells me to watch my carbs. Any advice? Thanks! To see DrSugar's advice and to learn more about prediabetes, Thanks for this question. Prediabetes is a very common problem estimated to affect around 57 million Americans. The condition is defined as a fasting blood sugar between 100 and 125, and according to your test you're clearly in the middle of that range. Diabetes is defined as any fasting blood sugar above 125. The HbA1c test, a measure your average blood sugar over about six weeks, is considered normal at under six percent so you are just above normal. Prediabetes is an important health condition to recognize and take seriously because it suggests you are at risk for progression to diabetes and all of its complications. Common Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

A condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not yet within the diabetic range. Prediabetes is also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The new term was inaugurated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in March 2002 to promote public understanding of this increasingly widespread problem. According to HHS, nearly 57 million Americans have prediabetes. Studies have shown that most people with blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years; the condition also raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 50%. Prediabetes can be controlled, and in many cases even reversed, through lifestyle changes. Prediabetes can be detected by either of the two standard tests currently used to diagnose diabetes. In the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG), a person fasts overnight and then has blood drawn for testing first thing in the morning, before he eats. Until recently, a normal fasting blood glucose level under 110 mg/dl was considered to be normal and fasting blood glucose in the range of 110 to 125 mg/dl indicated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or prediabetes. In late 2003, an international expert panel recommended that the cutoff be lowered to 100 mg/dl, so now people with a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dl are considered to have prediabetes. A fasting blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl indicates diabetes. (A second test must be done on a subsequent day to confirm a diagnosis of diabetes.) In the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a person’s blood glucose is tested once after an overnight fast and again two hours after he has consumed a special, glucose-rich drink. A normal blood glucose Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to blood sugar levels, the numbers always seem to confuse people. So we're here today to cover a whole range of reader questions that have come in. If you have questions of your own, join the discussion – please feel free to leave your comments at the bottom. Healthy blood sugar goal ranges Healthy blood sugar control values will depend on several factors, the most important being when you check it. Blood glucose levels will rise after eating meals regardless of whether a person has diabetes–however, someone with good control will be able to bring it down to a stable level after 2 hours. The diagnostic values below are for non pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Ranges are different for children, those with type I diabetes and pregnant women. FASTING AFTER MEALS 2 HOURS HbA1c Normal 70-99 mg/dL (4-6 mmol/L)* <140 mg/dL (<7.8 mmol/L)** <5.7% Pre-Diabetes 100-125 mg/dL (6.1-6.9 mmol/L) 140-179 mg/dL 5.7-6.4% Diabetes >126 mg/dL (>7 mmol/L) >180 mg/dL 6.5% and higher *Note that different agencies establish different standards. Some range 70-100 mg/dL, some 70-110 mg/dL, some 70-130 mg/dL **Some agencies recommend <180 mg/dL post-meal especially in the elderly and those who have had diabetes for a very long time What should your goals be? That is between you and your healthcare team because it does depend on various factors. But overall your goal is to gain good control of your diabetes, which means maintaining normal levels or getting as close to normal levels as possible (refer to the normal numbers above). We’ve answered some specific questions regarding blood sugar over here, so be sure to check those out as well. Some specific comments and questions we’ve received regarding blood sugar levels include: 1. My post meal is hovering around 140-160, Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 112 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 112 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 112 mg/dl fasting? (or 6.22mmol/l) Blood sugar 112 mg/dl (6.22mmol/l) fasting - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar fasting and the result was 112 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Slightly too high blood sugar (beginning hyperglycemia) To improve your blood sugar fasting you need to lower your blood glucose level by 12mg/dl. Your fasting blood sugar level should always be below 100mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesnt work correctly, Continue reading >>

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