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What Does A Blood Glucose Level Of 400 Mean?

What Is A Healthy Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Healthy Blood Sugar Level?

If you don't have diabetes, a healthy blood sugar is less than 126, says Holly Anderson, Outpatient Diabetes Coordinator at Reston Hospital Center. Watch this video to find out the healthy level for someone with diabetes. A healthy blood sugar level, obtained in a fasting state, is less than 100. A fasting blood sugar of greater than 126 is diabetic. A fasting blood sugar between 100 and 126 is considered "prediabetic". Prediabetes can be associated with increased risk for heart disease and should lead to lifestyle changes. Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider. According to the American Diabetes Association, normal blood glucose ranges between 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). In a person without diabetes, the body keeps its blood-glucose level between meals in a range of about 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). This level will rise after eating, depending on the type and amount of food consumed, but it will not exceed 139 mg/dL. It also quickly returns to the between-meal range. After you have fasted overnight or for an eight-hour period, your doctor can measure your blood glucose levels with a basic blood test. Blood sugar levels of under 100 are considered normal after an eight-hour fast. However, fasting blood glucose levels between 100-125 mg/dl could signal prediabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Cat

Diabetes Mellitus In Cat

Diabetes mellitus, commonly called “sugar diabetes” or just “diabetes,” is a disease caused by failure of the pancreas to produce adequate amounts of insulin. What does insulin do in my cat’s body? Insulin has been called the cells’ gatekeeper. It attaches to the surface of cells and permits glucose (blood sugar) to enter the cells from the blood. When insulin is absent or present in insufficient amounts, glucose builds up in the blood resulting in high blood glucose levels. Glucose is one of the body’s primary energy sources. When insufficient amounts of glucose are available to the cells, the body looks for alternate sources of energy (primarily fat and protein). Eventually, these energy demands lead to weight loss. This weight loss causes the cat to eat more in an attempt to make up for the “energy drain.” Also, the body attempts to remove excess blood glucose by spilling it into the urine. Since glucose attracts water, tremendous amounts of water follow this glucose into the urine. This loss of water causes dehydration and the cat must drink more to counteract it. Therefore, high blood glucose levels result in the four typical signs of diabetes: 1) weight loss, 2) a ravenous appetite, 3) increased urination, and 4) increased thirst. Not all of these signs are readily seen in every diabetic cat, but we expect that you will have seen at least two of them. How is diabetes diagnosed? The four clinical signs of diabetes are also present in other feline diseases. Therefore, clinical signs alone are not sufficient to make a diagnosis. The two most important laboratory tests are the blood glucose level and a urinalysis. The normal blood glucose level is 80-120 mg/dL (4.4-6.6 mmol/L). Diabetic cats often have levels over 400 (22), or even 600 mg/dL (33 mmol Continue reading >>

What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Above Which It Is Dangerous?

What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Above Which It Is Dangerous?

There is no straight forward way to answer this question. If you are a type 1 diabetic, your blood sugar may sky rocket to 400 or 500 if you miss an insulin injection before eating, or if your insulin pump malfunctions, etc. If you realize it quickly and correct it with insulin, there is little to no problem. Blood sugars that are elevated for a prolonged period of time for a type 1 can lead to DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis), which is life threatening and can certainly end in death if not treated. Prolonged elevated blood sugars can lead to dehydration, acidosis and electrolyte shifting. There are dangers associated with fixing these blood sugars too rapidly, and it’s best to go to a hospital where trained medical staff can monitor you. I have seen people come in to this hospital with DKA with glucose levels in the 300–700s. Blood sugars that are moderately elevated (150–250) won’t lead to immediate death and danger, but can cause long term damage of nerves and organs (kidneys, eyes, etc). Elevated blood sugars in an individual without diabetes is a different situation. If you are not diabetic and eat a ton of sugar, your blood glucose might be in the 200s immediately after eating, but your body will correct this and you will be FINE. *Also of note, if you have gestational diabetes, elevated sugars can cause issues with fetal development, so while it’s not too dangerous for the mother per se, it can have poor outcomes for the baby. Continue reading >>

Don’t Eat If Your Blood Sugar Is Over 150 Mg/dl

Don’t Eat If Your Blood Sugar Is Over 150 Mg/dl

Q: Recently I read an article in Post Graduate Medicine (“Effective Insulin Use,” Vol. 95, No. 8, June 1994, pgs. 52, 54, 58-60, 63-64, and 67). The article suggests the patient not eat if the blood glucose is greater than 150 mg/dl. I would appreciate you reading this article and giving me your opinion. Donna Doty, RN, BSN, CDE Methodist Hospital Gary, IN [Editor: An excellent question. We encourage all our readers to send us questions to answer. Coincidentally, the article you ask about was written by one of DIABETES IN-TERVEIW’s advisory board members: Nancy Bohannon, MD. We submitted your question to our board member Peter Lodewick, MD, diabetes expert and author of A Doctor Looks at Diabetes: His and Yours. Before we print his answer to your question, we’re presenting an excerpt from Dr. Bohannon’s article.] “My routine advice is as follows: if the blood glucose value is over 150 mg/dl before a meal, insulin should be taken and the meal postponed (not skipped) until the blood glucose is below 150 mg/dl. The glucose level should be checked hourly until it is below 200 mg/dl and then every 1/2 hour until it is below 150 mg/dl. A level that is still high after 1 1/2 to 2 hours without the patient’s eating is an indication that it was a good thing the patient didn’t eat! In the past, most patients would have eaten, saying, ‘my doctor told me never to miss or be late for a meal because I could get hypoglycemia.’ However, if the insulin was taken 3 hours previously and the blood glucose level remained above 150 mg/dl, food obviously was not necessary. “What happens if the blood glucose level is still high after 2 to 3 hours? A few more units of insulin should be taken and the meal again postponed until the glucose level is below 150 mg/dl. Occasiona Continue reading >>

Elevated Glucose In Cats

Elevated Glucose In Cats

Higher than normal blood glucose levels are not uncommon in cats, especially older cats. It's important that you learn the signs, symptom and treatments for high blood glucose levels because the sooner you diagnose and begin treatment, the more likely you can prevent related complications. Causes of High Blood Glucose Levels The most common cause of elevated blood glucose levels, also called hyperglycemia, in felines is a malfunction within a cat's endocrine system. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that facilitates the passage of glucose into an animal's cells. The cells metabolize the glucose to provide energy for your cat's everyday functioning. When the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin, glucose remains in the bloodstream and causes glucose levels to rise. Other causes of increased blood sugar levels include stress, hormones, pancreatitis, a high-carb diet, drug interactions, and bacterial infection. It's important to determine the cause of your kitty's hyperglycemia because some types are temporary and do not require long-term treatment. Complications Because you cat is not getting glucose into her cells, she will feel lethargic and begin to lose weight because her body starts burning muscle tissue for energy. If left untreated, the hyperglycemia will turn into diabetes. Feline diabetes can lead to kidney damage, vision problems, neuropathy and weakness in your cat's legs. Another complication, ketoacidosis, is a serious condition that arises when ketones, a byproduct of the digestion of a body's own tissues, build up in the bloodstream. Ketoacidosis requires immediate attention by your veterinarian. Always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your pet. Diagnosis Watch for any signs that might signal that your Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms And Information

High Blood Sugar Symptoms And Information

What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than normal. It is the main problem caused by diabetes. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called glucose. How does it occur? Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, high blood sugar happens because your body is not making insulin. Insulin moves sugar from the blood into your cells. It is normally made by the pancreas. If you have type 2 diabetes, high blood sugar usually happens because the cells have become unable to use the insulin your body is making. In both cases high levels of sugar build up in the blood. Sometimes people with diabetes can have high blood sugar even if they are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: skipping your diabetes medicine or not taking the right amount of medicine if you are using insulin: a problem with your insulin (for example, the wrong type or damage to the insulin because it has not been stored properly) if you are using an insulin pump: a problem with the pump (for example, the pump is turned off or the catheter has come out) taking medicines that make your blood sugar medicines work less well (steroids, hormones or water pills) eating or drinking too much (that is, taking in too many calories) not getting enough physical activity emotional or physical stress illness, including colds and flu, especially if there is fever infections, such as an abscessed tooth or urinary tract infection Even if you don’t have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar for a brief time after you eat a food very high in sugar. For exam Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Cats

High Blood Sugar In Cats

Hyperglycemia in Cats The term hyperglycemia refers to higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. A simple carbohydrate sugar that circulates in the blood, glucose is a major source of energy for the body, of which normal levels range between 75-120mg. Insulin, a hormone that is produced and released by the pancreas into the bloodstream when glucose levels rise, plays a pivotal role in maintaining the blood sugar levels within normal limits. If insulin concentration is too low or there is absolute deficiency of insulin, levels of glucose rise sharply leading to hyperglycemia. Some of the causes for hyperglycemia may be pancreatitis, and the resulting inability to produce insulin; normally occurring hormones, especially in female cats; diet; and infections of the body (such as teeth, or urinary tract). Middle aged and older cats are more at risk for developing hyperglycemia, but otherwise, no breed is particularly disposed to this condition. Neutered male cats are at increased risk. Cats in general are prone to high blood sugar, typically during times of stress, where glucose levels may reach 300-400mg. This is often a temporary increase in blood sugar, and while it warrants further observation, it may not be cause to diagnose chronic hyperglycemia or diabetes mellitus. Symptoms and Types Clinical symptoms may vary depending on the underlying disease/condition. Your cat may not be showing any serious symptoms, especially those if the increased sugar is thought to be temporary, hormonal, or stress induced hyperglycemia. Some of the more common symptoms include: Depression Weight loss Excessive hunger Dehydration Bloodshot eyes (due to inflamed blood vessels) Liver enlargement Nerve damage in legs Severe depression (in cases of very high blood sugar levels) Non-hea Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Over 400? Beware!

Blood Sugar Levels Over 400? Beware!

Learn what to do when blood sugar levels are over 400. Most importantly, read about what you can do to lower these risks and prevent this from happening. When blood sugar levels are over 400 mg/dl, it's no joke. There are many serious risks associated with blood sugar levels this high, but the good news is there are ways to prevent such high levels. Normal blood sugar levels range from 70 mg/dl to 120 mg/dl. High blood sugar levels may cause you to feel tired, thirsty and feel the urge to urinate frequently. Other side effects include increased susceptibility to infections and blurry vision.For diabetics who are in the later stages in life, a high blood sugar level can result in dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The Dangerous Duo While the symptoms discussed above are associated with high blood sugar levels in general, there are two main dangers that are specifically linked to blood sugar levels over 400. The first is hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (HHNS). HHNS occurs when the body’s blood sugar levels rise to unsafe levels. As a result, the body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into the urine. Eventually this could result in severe dehydration which in turn can lead to seizures, coma and even death. There are several reasons why HHNS can occur: illness, infection, skipping doses of medicine or not adhering to one’s prescribed meal plan. Symptoms of HHNS include extreme thirst, dry skin, high fever, sleepiness, loss of vision, hallucinations and weakness on one side of the body. If you are experiencing the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately. In the meantime, drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration and test your sugar so that you can report your findings to the doctor. The other danger that is associated with Continue reading >>

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

The human body naturally has sugar, or glucose, in the blood. The right amount of blood sugar gives the body's cells and organs energy. The liver and muscles produce some blood sugar, but most of it comes from food and drinks that contain carbohydrates. In order to keep blood sugar levels within a normal range, the body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes blood sugar and delivers it to the body's cells. Contents of this article: What does it feel like to have high blood sugar levels? Blood sugar is fuel for the body's organs and functions. But having high blood sugar doesn't provide a boost in energy. In fact, it's often the opposite. Because the body's cells can't access the blood sugar for energy, a person may feel tiredness, hunger, or exhaustion frequently. In addition, high sugar in the blood goes into the kidneys and urine, which attracts more water, causing frequent urination. This can also lead to increased thirst, despite drinking enough liquids. High blood sugar can cause sudden or unexplained weight loss. This occurs because the body's cells aren't getting the glucose they need, so the body burns muscle and fat for energy instead. High blood sugar can also cause numbness, burning, or tingling in the hands, legs, and feet. This is caused by diabetic neuropathy, a complication of diabetes that often occurs after many years of high blood sugar levels. What does high blood sugar mean for the rest of the body? Over time, the body's organs and systems can be harmed by high blood sugar. Blood vessels become damaged, and this can lead to complications, including: Damage to the eye and loss of vision Kidney disease or failure Nerve problems in the skin, especially the feet, leading to sores, infections, and wound healing problems Causes of high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to blood sugar levels, the numbers always seem to confuse people. So we're here today to cover a whole range of reader questions that have come in. If you have questions of your own, join the discussion – please feel free to leave your comments at the bottom. Healthy blood sugar goal ranges Healthy blood sugar control values will depend on several factors, the most important being when you check it. Blood glucose levels will rise after eating meals regardless of whether a person has diabetes–however, someone with good control will be able to bring it down to a stable level after 2 hours. The diagnostic values below are for non pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Ranges are different for children, those with type I diabetes and pregnant women. FASTING AFTER MEALS 2 HOURS HbA1c Normal 70-99 mg/dL (4-6 mmol/L)* <140 mg/dL (<7.8 mmol/L)** <5.7% Pre-Diabetes 100-125 mg/dL (6.1-6.9 mmol/L) 140-179 mg/dL 5.7-6.4% Diabetes >126 mg/dL (>7 mmol/L) >180 mg/dL 6.5% and higher *Note that different agencies establish different standards. Some range 70-100 mg/dL, some 70-110 mg/dL, some 70-130 mg/dL **Some agencies recommend <180 mg/dL post-meal especially in the elderly and those who have had diabetes for a very long time What should your goals be? That is between you and your healthcare team because it does depend on various factors. But overall your goal is to gain good control of your diabetes, which means maintaining normal levels or getting as close to normal levels as possible (refer to the normal numbers above). We’ve answered some specific questions regarding blood sugar over here, so be sure to check those out as well. Some specific comments and questions we’ve received regarding blood sugar levels include: 1. My post meal is hovering around 140-160, Continue reading >>

Dead In Bed Syndrome

Dead In Bed Syndrome

Twitter recently got in a twit about a statement someone found on the Internet: "One in 20 type 1 diabetics die in their sleep due to a sudden drop in their blood sugar." That’s quite a statistic, and one that raises all sorts of questions. Where did this strange and disturbing statistic come from? Does this mean that of all T1 PWD who die, 1 in 20 (5%) die in their sleep from something relating to dropping blood sugar? Does "sudden drop" mean any kind of drop - for instance, from high to normal, or only if it goes low? What’s the evidence that these deaths are indeed due to low blood sugar? And what can we do to prevent such a death? The "Dead in Bed Syndrome" is quite a problem, both for parents of kids with diabetes, and their physicians. One pediatric endocrinologist said "my patients are totally freaked out about this (as am I). My problem is that we have about 1200 patients in our practice with type 1 dm- does that mean statistically 6 patients in my practice will_ __eventually _drop dead in their sleep." A thorough discussion with multiple references, is on-line at the Children With Diabetes website, at The Dead in Bed Syndrome. It should be noted that different authors have developed different definitions for the Dead in Bed Syndrome (sometimes abbreviated DIB), and partially as a result of the differing definitions, and probably mainly as a result of differing patient populations (e.g., country where the study was done, degree of diabetes control of the patients, age breakdown, etc.) the rate of DIB varies widely. The Dead in Bed Syndrome was first discussed in 1991 when the Professional Advisory Committee of the British Diabetic Association published a report, Unexplained deaths of type 1 diabetic patients. They evaluated 50 autopsied deaths of people with Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose 160

Blood Glucose 160

What happens when blood glucose hits 160 mg/dl? A blood glucose at this level is typical after, say, a bowl of slow-cooked oatmeal with no added sugar, a small serving of Cheerios, or even an apple in the ultra carb-sensitive. Normal blood sugar with an empty stomach, i.e., fasting; high blood sugars after eating. Conventional wisdom is that a blood sugar of 160 mg/dl is okay, since your friendly primary care doctor says that any postprandial glucose of 200 mg/dl or less is fine because you don't "need" medication. But what sort of phenomena occur when blood sugars are in this range? Here's a list: --Glycation (i.e., glucose modification of proteins) of various tissues, including the lens of your eyes (cataracts), kidney tissue leading to kidney disease, skin leading to wrinkles, cartilage leading to stiffness, degeneration, and arthritis. --Glycation of LDL particles. Glycated LDL particles are more prone to oxidation. --VLDL and triglyceride production by the liver, i.e., de novo lipogenesis. --Small LDL particle formation--The increased VLDL/triglyceride production leads to the CETP-mediated reaction that creates small LDL particles which are, in turn, more glycation- and oxidation-prone. --Glucotoxicity--i.e., a direct toxic effect of high blood glucose. This is especially an issue for the vulnerable beta cells of the pancreas that produce insulin. Repeated glucotoxic poundings by high glucose levels lead to fewer functional beta cells. A blood glucose of 160 mg/dl is definitely not okay. While it is not an immediate threat to your health, repeated exposures will lead you down the same path that diabetics tread with all of its health problems. Continue reading >>

Urine Sugar Levels Chart, What Does Sugar In Urine Mean?

Urine Sugar Levels Chart, What Does Sugar In Urine Mean?

what does it mean to have glucose in your urine if you are child, man, or woman? Should the one concerned about sugar in his/her urine? Does maple colored urine indicate sugar in urine? Please be patient and read carefully, comment with your question if you cannot find answer. What does glucosuria means? Medical term for sugar in the urine is Glycosuria or glucosuria, it is the excretion of excessive blood glucose into the urine filtrate. Is it normal to have sugar in your urine Ordinarily, urine contains no glucose because the kidneys are able to reclaim all of the filtered glucose back into the bloodstream. When you find a positive urine test for glucose, it means you have high level of sugar in your blood. What does too much glucose in urine mean? You can see glucose in your urine after the glucose in your blood exceeds 162 – 180 mg/dl which is the normal glucose threshold of the kidney. excess glucose in urine is usually not a healthy concern, and of course there is nothing to call it the normal glucose levels in urinalysis. sugar in the urine in diabetes mellitus type 2: the kidney cannot deal with great amount of sugar which increased above the normal threshold of glucose, and excrete it in the urinary fluid. In case of type 1 diabetes mellitus, the sugar drop in the urine as well as ketone bodies or “Acetone” in urine, the reasons behind acetone in urine is the consumption of fatty acids in the body to produce energy when the glucose is not available, remember that glucose in case of DM voided regularly through the urination while the body organs need the sugar for energy. Blood Sugar levels chart. 1+ glucose in urine test, is it normal? Even trace sugar in the urine is not clinically normal, 1+ means that the serum glucose is above 180 mg/dl and the urine Continue reading >>

Interpreting The Glucose Curves

Interpreting The Glucose Curves

The blood glucose level in non-diabetic dogs usually runs between about 70mg/dL and 140 mg/dl. In those fortunate dogs, pancreatic beta cells are continuously monitoring blood sugar levels and releasing insulin into the system as required. But dogs that have blood glucose levels persistently greater than 200mg/dL have diabetes. With the medicines of today, there is no way you can duplicate the normal situation with injected insulin. The best you can hope for is to keep your pet's blood sugar level between 100mg/dL and 150mg/dL. Occasional owners can attain that, but most will find that their dogs peak (spike) considerably higher. Larger or more frequent doses of insulin will drive down these glucose spikes. But that can be dangerous. You do not want the valleys (nadirs) in your dogs daily glucose levels to be too low (lower than 80mg/dL) because at slightly less than that, the dog will become hypoglycemic. With AM and PM injections, their should be two nadirs. The morning one is usually the lowest. The safest Low Nadir Point for a dog in insulin therapy is about 90 - 100. That is because, after the insulin injection, glucose follow a skateboard track downward and you will never know from your last glucometer reading how close you are to the bottom. So fudge on the side of caution. If your pet is persistently running over 200 - 250 mg/dL you should at least try to modify its treatment procedure to gain better control and regulation. To obtain tighter regulation, will probably require quite a bit of home blood glucose testing and effort on your part – at least at first. No matter how hard you try, it is not always possible. But please try not to get exasperated or make rash decisions on your own. You get to choose your veterinarian. But the veterinarian, not you, is the Continue reading >>

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