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What Do You Give A Dog With Low Blood Sugar?

Emergency Treatment For Hypoglycemia & Seizures In Dogs

Emergency Treatment For Hypoglycemia & Seizures In Dogs

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is one of many causes of seizures in dogs. It occurs most commonly in young puppies of small breed dogs but can also occur secondary to other disease processes in older dogs. Emergency first aid for a dog with hypoglycemia requires administering a high-sugar substance orally, but you'll need to do so carefully to avoid hurting yourself or your dog. Blood Sugar Deficiency Hypoglycemia results when blood sugar levels fall below a normal range. Blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, is important for all cellular function because it is converted into energy by the cells of the body. The brain has an especially high demand for glucose, so when blood glucose levels fall severely, seizure activity can occur in the brain. In addition to glucose circulating in the blood, the body packages some glucose into storage molecules called glycogen that are stored in skeletal muscle and the liver. These glycogen stores can be rapidly broken down into glucose molecules during exercise and other periods of high energy demand. Emergency First Aid for Hypoglycemia Initial symptoms of hypoglycemia in dogs and puppies include weakness, depression, staggering, or trembling. Feeding a small amount of a sugar-rich food such as vanilla ice cream, Karo syrup or honey can rapidly improve the animal's condition. If the dog is not coherent enough to eat, rubbing a small amount of one of these substances on the gums will help -- but be careful to avoid being bitten. Never feed chocolate to a dog, as chocolate causes toxicity in dogs. If a dog is having a hypoglycemic seizure, do not put your fingers in the dog's mouth; often, a dog will chomp his jaws involuntarily. Instead, use something else to squirt a small amount of a sugary substance into the mouth, such as ho Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low blood sugar can affect puppies much more often than adult dogs, even when your puppy is healthy, so it's important to learn about low blood sugar symptoms and what to do. The technical term is hypoglycemia and happens most often with adult pets that suffer from diabetes. Sugar moves into the cells with the help of insulin, and too much insulin can cause hypoglycemia. Puppies almost never have diabetes, but can develop low blood sugar due to intestinal parasites that compromise digestion. Very small puppies, especially Toy breeds like the Chihuahua or Pomeranian, are so tiny, they have very few fat stores. Fat is body fuel, and when there’s not enough, the blood sugar levels fall. Adult pets can make up this difference when their liver churns out the necessary sugar. But immature livers can’t manufacture enough necessary sugar and as a result, these tiny pups develop hypoglycemia. What Are Low Blood Sugar Symptoms? The signs of low blood sugar can be vague. It’s important to watch out for them especially if your puppy is a tiny breed that’s most susceptible. Without enough sugar, the puppy’s heartbeat rate and breathing slow down and that triggers a cascade effect of other symptoms. Be alert for any one or combination of the following signs. The puppy acts weak. The puppy becomes sleepy. The puppy seems disoriented. He develops a wobbly “drunk” gait. His eyes look ‘glassy’ and unfocused. The puppy starts to twitch, shake or tremble/shiver. His head tilts to one side. He develops seizures. The puppy falls unconscious and can’t be awakened. Without prompt attention and first aid, your puppy could die. But fortunately, when you recognize the signs early in the process, low blood sugar is easy to treat and reverse at home. In almost all cases, the pup Continue reading >>

Chihuahua Blood Sugar Problems

Chihuahua Blood Sugar Problems

What is Hypoglycemia in Chihuahuas? Chihuahuas, like many small breeds, have trouble regulating their blood sugar. The first time my Chi suffered an episode of low sugar, I really did not know what was wrong. He was 7 months old, and had a pretty typical day. Then a short time after playing, he started walking like he was drunk. It was as though he had no control over his legs. He threw up foam and then basically fell over. I was beside myself how we could have been playing one minute and into this scene the next. I have always had at least one dog in my life, and my Chihuahua, Norbit was my first small breed of dog and I was not savvy to the hypoglycemia thing. It was on a Sunday, so we wrapped Norbit up in a blanket and went to the emergency vet. They took one look and said my dog had been poisoned. I said that was really impossible, he literally spent zero time unattended. I knew for certain my dog hadn't chewed on anything but his toys. Then another vet tech on duty said, "He is in sugar shock". She had several Chihuahuas at home herself she had rescued and she said low blood sugar wasn't uncommon in small breeds. She put some Karo syrup on a flat wooden stick and he just stared at it glassy-eyed like he had no idea how to lick. So she put roughly a teaspoon of the syrup in a syringe and while explaining I should never do this at home as he could choke, he gently pushed the syrup right down this throat. He was seriously right as rain in a very short time. It was extremely frightening however and I vowed to do my best that my dog never experienced this again by learning why it happened and what I needed to do to prevent it. What Symptoms Will My Chihuahua Have? In the case of my dog, his low blood sugar was caused by a play session that went on a little too long and Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia () when their bodies don't have enough sugar to use as fuel. It can happen for several reasons, including diet, some medications and conditions, and exercise. If you get hypoglycemia, write down the date and time when it happened and what you did. Share your record with your doctor, so she can look for a pattern and adjust your medications. Call your doctor if you have more than one unexplained low blood sugar reaction in a week. Most people feel symptoms of hypoglycemia when their blood sugar is 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower. Each person with diabetes may have different symptoms of hypoglycemia. You'll learn to spot yours. Early symptoms include: Confusion Dizziness Feeling shaky Hunger Headaches Irritability Pounding heart; racing pulse Pale skin Sweating Trembling Weakness Anxiety Without treatment, you might get more severe symptoms, including: Poor coordination Poor concentration Numbness in mouth and tongue Passing out Ask your doctor if any of your medicines can cause low blood sugar. Insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, and so can a type of diabetes medications called "sulfonylureas." Commonly used sulfonylureas include: Glibenclamide (Glyburide, Micronase) Gliclazide Older, less common sulfonlyureas tend to cause low blood sugar more often than some of the newer ones. Examples of older drugs include: You can also get low blood sugar if you drink alcohol or take allopurinol (Zyloprim), aspirin, Benemid, probenecid (Probalan), or warfarin (Coumadin) with diabetes medications. You shouldn't get hypoglycemia if you take alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides (such as metformin), and thiazolidinediones alone, but it can happen when you take them with sulfonylureas or insulin. You can get low blood sugar Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is what every diabetic fears -- very low blood glucose. Since the brain requires glucose for fuel at every second, it's possible to induce coma, seizures,brain damage[1][2][3] and death by letting blood glucose drop too low. Because the brain is almost totally dependent on glucose to make use of oxygen[4], it is somewhat like having severe breathing problems. Though the causes and mechanisms are different, in both cases the brain does not have enough oxygen, and similar symptoms and problems can occur. It is caused by giving too much insulin for the body's current needs. The blood glucose level at which an animal (or person) is dangerously hypoglycemic is fuzzy, and depends on several factors.[5] The line is different for diabetics and non-diabetics, and differs between individuals and depending on exogenous insulin and what the individual is accustomed to. The most likely time for an acute hypoglycemia episode is when the insulin is working hardest, or at its peak; mild lows may cause lethargy and sleepiness[6]. An acute hypoglycemic episode can happen even if you are careful, since pets' insulin requirements sometimes change without warning. Pets and people can have hypoglycemic episodes because of increases to physical activity. What makes those with diabetes prone to hypoglycemia is that muscles require glucose for proper function. The more active muscles become, the more their need for glucose increases[7]. Conversely, there can also be hyperglycemic reactions from this; it depends on the individual/caregiver knowing him/herself and the pet's reactions. According to a 2000 JAVMA study, dogs receiving insulin injections only once daily at high doses[9] are more likely to have hypoglycemic episodes than those who receive insulin twice daily. The symptoms Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia is a dangerous condition in which your blood sugar drops perilously low. Low blood sugar will most often make you feel shaky and weak. In extreme cases, you could lose consciousness and slip into a coma. People develop hypoglycemia for different reasons, but those with diabetes run the greatest risk of developing the condition. Glucose and Hypoglycemia Your body uses glucose as its main fuel source. Glucose is derived from food, and it's delivered to cells through the bloodstream. The body uses different hormones to regulate the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucagon, cortisol, and epinephrine are some hormones that help regulate glucose. Your body uses another hormone called insulin to help your cells absorb glucose and burn it for fuel. If your blood sugar level drops below a certain point, your body can develop various symptoms and sensations. For people with diabetes, this typically happens when blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), although the exact level may vary from person to person. Causes of Hypoglycemia Low blood sugar often happens in people with diabetes who are using insulin or other medicines that increase insulin production or its actions. Too much insulin can make your blood glucose drop too low. Low blood sugar can happen if: Your body's supply of glucose is used up too quickly. Glucose is released into your bloodstream too slowly. There's too much insulin in your bloodstream. Hypoglycemia Symptoms Although no two people will have the exact same symptoms of low blood sugar, there are some common signs to watch out for: Sudden, intense hunger Dizziness or light-headedness Excessive sweating (often sudden and without regard to temperature) Shaking or tremors Sudden feelings of anxiety Irritability, mood swings, and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

By Ernest Ward, DVM & Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Emergency Situations, Medical Conditions This handout provides detailed information on insulin administration. For more information about diabetes mellitus, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - General Information", and "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment". What is diabetes mellitus? In dogs, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar. This is Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (also called Type 1 Diabetes). This type of diabetes usually results from destruction of most or all of the beta-cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar levels. What do I need to know about insulin treatment for diabetes mellitus? In diabetic dogs, the main treatment for regulating blood glucose is giving insulin by injection. Dogs with diabetes mellitus typically require two daily insulin injections as well as a dietary change. Although the dog can go a day or so without insulin and not have a crisis, this should not be a regular occurrence; treatment should be looked upon as part of the dog's daily routine. This means that you, as the dog's owner, must make both a financial commitment and a personal commitment to treat your dog. If are out of town or go on vacation, your dog must receive proper treatment in your absence. Initially, your dog may be hospitalized for a few days to deal with any immediate crisis and to begin the insulin regulation process. For instance, if your dog is so sick that he has quit eating and drinking for several days, he may be experiencing “diabetic ketoacidosis,” which may require a several days of intensive care. On Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Dogs (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar In Dogs (hypoglycemia)

Definition of Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is defined as an abnormally low level or concentration of the simple sugar, glucose, in an animal’s bloodstream. Glucose is the end product of carbohydrate digestion. Carbohydrates in food are an important and immediate source of energy for most animals. The main sources of dietary carbohydrates are the starches and sugars that come from plants. Glucose is the primary source of energy for the cells and tissues of dogs. When there is more glucose in circulation (from dietary intake) than is needed for the dog’s energy demands, it is stored in liver and muscle cells in the form of glycogen, for future use. If the liver and muscle cells become saturated, glucose is converted into fat and stored as adipose tissue. Circulating blood sugar levels depend upon the amount of glucose that is: 1) taken in through a dog’s diet, 2) produced by the liver from glycogen stores, and 3) utilized by the dog’s body. Abnormalities in any of those areas can contribute to hypoglycemia. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia: That Dog-gone Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia: That Dog-gone Low Blood Sugar

This column is going to be a little different, because instead of explaining something about diabetes, I’m going to tell a story about some recent events in my own life with diabetes. I have had type 2 diabetes since 1991. I was already a diabetes educator when I diagnosed my own diabetes, and soon told my doctor about it. Because I had severe side effects with oral medications, I have used insulin from the first year. After doing multiple injections for several years, I got an insulin pump, and have managed my diabetes with a pump ever since then. As a diabetes educator, I have seen all the major diabetes complications in my patients, so I am highly motivated to prevent complications in myself. Therefore, I have done intensive management from the beginning, trying to keep my blood sugar as close to normal as possible. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to do this perfectly. So at times, I have low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. On the day this story begins, I was lying on my bed. A little circular thought was running around my brain, saying, “I don’t feel so good…. I wonder what’s happening to me…. I really don’t feel good…. I wonder what this is…. I don’t feel good…. I wonder…..” Round and round this thought went, repeating itself over and over. Suddenly, I felt a cold, wet nose and a fuzzy snout against my neck. My dog, Yoda, was pushing against my neck. He is small – only about 11 pounds – but he was pushing with all his might. Finally, it occurred to me that he wanted me to get up. I stood up, still not feeling so good and wondering what was happening to me. Yoda pushed against the back of my leg. A drop of sweat dripped off the end of my nose. That drop of sweat broke through my circular wondering with a fact: Sweat dripping off the e Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

Hypoglycemia in dogs is the condition of having low blood sugar, which results in symptoms that mostly relate to an affected dog’s energy level. It can be caused by underlying conditions or exposure to certain substances. When it becomes severe, hypoglycemia can cause pain, seizures, unconsciousness, and even death in canines. Sugar, which takes the form of glucose, provides energy for your dog’s entire body. When the blood sugar level is too low, it will eventually affect the organs and brain function. That’s why it is important to consult your veterinarian if you see signs that your dog might be hypoglycemic. Here is what you should know about the symptoms, causes, and treatments for hypoglycemia in dogs. Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia In Dogs Symptoms of hypoglycemia in dogs usually begin mildly with signs of low energy, but the condition can progress to more dangerous symptoms quickly if left untreated. Sometimes these symptoms come and go, while other times they are persistent. If you spot the following signs that your dog is hypoglycemic, you should take them to the vet immediately. Lethargy Slow response to stimuli Weakness Loss of coordination Increased thirst or urination Decreased or increased appetite Weight gain Muscle spasms Trembling Irregular heart rate or breathing Paralysis of the hind legs Seizures Blindness Collapse or unconsciousness Causes Of Hypoglycemia In Dogs Hypoglycemia in dogs can be caused by a number of underlying conditions, or it can be the result of exposure to certain substances. It results from glucose being removed from the bloodstream, an inadequate amount of glucose from diet, or low production of glucose from glycogen stores by the liver. Any condition that affects glucose levels could result in hypoglycemia. Here are several known Continue reading >>

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Signs Treatment Asymptomatic Hypo Be Prepared (how to carry a sugar supply) Exercise and hypo. Nigel Goes Hypo Hypo Humor References The most serious side effect of too much insulin is hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose. Hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening, even fatal condition. Classic signs of hypoglycemia lethargy (lack of energy) weakness head tilting "drunkedness" - wobbling when walking, unbalanced hunger restlessness shivering ataxia - usually lack of muscular coordination, but maybe changes in head and neck movements disorientation stupor convulsions or seizures coma The occurrence of signs depends on how far the bg drops and on how fast the blood glucose drops. Owners of diabetic cats have also reported observing these signs sleepiness unable to wake the cat easily when it is sleeping. vomiting glassy eyes - it may look like it is staring into space laying, sleeping, or curled up in an unusual location of the house meowing, crying, yowling, or vocalizing in a way that is unusual for your cat some cats get aggressive drooling coughing Owners of diabetic dogs have also reported observing these signs sweating - check the nose and the paw pads. lip smacking or licking getting physically "stuck" in a place where the pet normally could get itself out (for example, behind a partially closed door that a pet would usually nudge open.) Some animals are asymptomatic at very low bg values. This means they do not show any of the usual signs of hypoglycemia even though their bg is very low. Read experiences of three pets who have had episodes of asymptomatic hypoglycemia. Be Prepared Always have corn syrup or sugar available. Corn syrup works well because it is a very pure sugar, and it is liquid. In the U.S. "Karo" is a brand name of corn syrup and you'll often see this Continue reading >>

I Had A Sugar Overdose And My Body Is Aching All Over With A Fever, But My Blood Sugar Is Going Low. What Should I Do?

I Had A Sugar Overdose And My Body Is Aching All Over With A Fever, But My Blood Sugar Is Going Low. What Should I Do?

As a type 1 for 50 years: Contact your doctor or nurse educator for advice. Ideally you need to set up a protocol with one of them for how to manage these situations at home etc. Personally, and this is not medical advice or opinion, if I have a hypo i have learnt to be careful about how much sugar I take to combat it . I know how disturbing hypos are; how hungry and anxious one can be; how ravenous whilst waiting for hypo symptoms to settle. And I have experienced plenty of “rebounds’ from low to high sugar levels after a hypo and know how ghastly one can feel. You are not alone !! From my diabetes education I know that my liver releases glucose to try and maintain a sugar level that keeps my brain fuelled and that will send sugars up. In fact I recall seeing a fellow patient having a hypo in a diabetic clinic, seeing her given a sweet drink and whilst still shaking and confused her blood sugar was recorded at 14 mmol/l ( 252 mg/dL). So with a hypo I try to have a number of jelly beans, 3 to 5, move if I can to sitting, out of danger then check my blood sugar. If it is below 3 mmol/l ( 54 mg/dL) I might have a further 2 jelly beans. Then I wait 30 minutes and repeat my blood sugar. If my blood sugar has increased, I wait further, and repeat blood sugar in another 30 minutes. If blood sugar is less than 3.6 mmol/l ( 65 mg/dl) I take 2 more jelly beans. As long as my blood sugar is now above 3.6 mmol/l ( 65 mg/dl) I will often take some slower acting carbohydrate ( biscuit/bread) but no more quick stuff like jelly beans, glucose tabs, honey etc.( the bread etc reduces thehunger pangs without pushing sugar levels up so much). When my blood sugar gets to above 6.6 mmol/l ( about 119 mg/dl) I start feeding in the numbers to my pump and bolus accordingly. Meantime I anal Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Overview Hypoglycemia is often referred to as “low blood sugar.” When your dog’s body is deprived of sugar, its main source of energy, his ability to function declines and, in severe situations, loss of consciousness or even death can result. Low blood sugar is not a disease itself; rather, it is a symptom of an underlying disease or problem. There are many causes of hypoglycemia. Puppies, especially those under 3 months of age, have not fully developed their ability to regulate their blood glucose (sugar) levels. Hypoglycemia can be brought on when puppies are introduced to other stress factors such as poor nutrition, cold environments, and intestinal parasites. Toy breeds are especially susceptible to this problem. Hypoglycemia can also be brought on by fasting combined with rigorous exercise, or by Addison’s disease. Dogs treated for diabetes mellitus are at risk, as well as dogs with severe liver disease, tumors of the pancreas, or portosystemic shunts. Symptoms If your pet is hypoglycemic, you may notice the following symptoms: Muscle twitches Trembling Incoordination Unusual behavior Blindness Unconsciousness If your dog is suspected of being hypoglycemic, your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam, take a complete history, and may recommend diagnostic tests that could include: Measurement of blood glucose levels (sugar levels in the blood) Chemistry tests to evaluate kidney, liver, and pancreatic function A complete blood count (CBC) to rule out blood related conditions Electrolyte tests to ensure your pet isn’t dehydrated or suffering from an electrolyte imbalance Urine tests to screen for urinary tract infection and other disease, and to evaluate the ability of the kidneys to concentrate urine A thyroid test to determine if the thyroid gl Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Dog

Low Blood Sugar In Dog

I have a 3 year old American Bull dog. Lately I have noticed he hasn't been acting like himself. It started when I was feeding him Calfornia Grain Free. He got very clingy, would sleep more and just seemed ADR. Checked his blood sugar and did blood work at this time and the only thing that seemed off was that his blood sugar seemed low. Months later I have switched to a more raw diet and he still seems to have the problems of low blood sugar. Today it was 56 after eatting dinner. Any ideas on what might cause that? By: Shawn Haubenstricker El Segundo, CA Dogs will typically become symptomatic of low blood sugar at a level 50 or lower. Does your dog ever become ataxic (difficulty walking, falling over, running into things)?. Have you given your dog Karo syrup when his blood glucose is dropping? If you have and your dog immediately acts normal, then there may be a problem. There are a few disease processes besides diabetes that can cause low blood sugar. One is a rare tumor called an "insulinoma", this is a tumor of the pancreas that causes over production of insulin, resulting in low blood sugar levels. A second tumor that can cause this is called a parathyroid tumor. Typically, it is older dogs that present with these tumors, so suspicion of your pet having one of these tumors is low. My most immediate concern is your pet's diet. I reviewed the ingredients of your pet's previous diet and found it to be substandard. The protein source of any food, regardless if it is meat or grain, must be high quality for your pet to do well. "Chicken meal" is basically a word for "everything but the actual meat of the chicken". Dogs were omnivores in the wild, before they were domesticated. They would eat meat or plant proteins to survive. There is nothing substandard about feeding a d Continue reading >>

Give Me Some Sugar! Canine Low Blood Sugar–symptoms And Treatments

Give Me Some Sugar! Canine Low Blood Sugar–symptoms And Treatments

There is a dog blood-glucose disorder that goes by three names: Canine Hypoglycemia , Exertional Hypoglycemia and Sugar Fits. These names refer to one single condition: cells in your canine’s body aren’t receiving the needed amount of glucose. Your dog’s energy is derived from glucose that is supplied by the blood, but with Canine Hypoglycemia, blood glucose levels lower than 70 mg/dL should be cause for concern and are considered increasingly dangerous, of course, as the numbers go down. The normal level is 70-150 mg/dL. Different factors enter into the cause, but if you suspect your beloved family member might be diabetic, it’s important to have your canine-cutie diagnosed properly, and quickly, since untreated hypoglycemia can, ultimately, result in seizure/coma and death. Symptoms Of Canine Hypoglycemia: Disorientation or confusion Trembling lip Seizures (dogs 4 or over are more prone) Weakness-shakiness-dizziness Anxiety Lack-luster personality/lethargy/depression Prevention/Treatment: Obviously, the goal is to raise your pet’s blood-sugar level or maintain normal sugar levels; and this can be achieved in several ways: Feed your pet smaller, more frequent meals. There is a food supplement known as PetAlive GlucoBalance which aides in pancreatic and liver functions. Smaller meals, plus the PetAlive, can potentially correct the problem, but a blood test from your pet’s vet is required to properly determine if this regime-change will have made a difference. Treats should be avoided, at this time, unless permitted by your dog’s doctor. If you suspect your canine’s blood sugar is low, visiting the vet is crucial. The vet will, automatically, check blood-sugar levels. If necessary, a form of glucose will be fed intravenously -directly into the bloodstream Continue reading >>

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