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What Could Be The Reason For High Glucose Levels?

What Are The Causes Of High Glucose Blood Test Results?

What Are The Causes Of High Glucose Blood Test Results?

High blood glucose may be the signal of a developing medical condition or may simply be a short-term response to recent eating or stress. Diabetes, including gestational diabetes associated with pregnancy, is a prevalent cause of high blood glucose test results. High blood glucose levels can also indicate thyroid disease or pancreatic inflammation. Certain medications can cause your blood glucose levels to spike as well. Video of the Day If you forget to fast prior to a fasting blood glucose test, high glucose levels may be caused by the normal rise in blood sugar that occurs after eating. If you are given a blood glucose test after eating, be sure to alert your physician, who may suggest a follow-up test to ensure proper testing conditions. High blood glucose levels are the hallmark of type 1 and 2 diabetes. They occur in the early stages of these conditions, before other symptoms appear. Diabetes specific to pregnancy, or gestational diabetes, also causes an increase in blood sugar levels. To best diagnose prediabetes or diabetes, your doctor will likely order follow-up glucose tests on different days. She may also recommend an oral glucose tolerance test, in which your blood glucose levels are measured before and after consuming a sugar-containing drink. You will also likely undergo a hemoglobin A1c test, which serves to measure your average blood sugar levels over the past few months. Apart from diabetes, a large number of less common medical conditions can also cause high blood glucose levels. Such conditions include an overactive thyroid gland, pancreatic inflammation and certain cancers. Higher-than-normal blood sugar levels may also be caused by infections, especially if they are severe. Certain medications, notably corticosteroids, can raise blood glucose level Continue reading >>

5 Reasons Your Blood Sugar Is High

5 Reasons Your Blood Sugar Is High

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when it comes to trying to understand what’s causing your high blood sugars. In life with diabetes, it’s only natural that we experience high blood sugars now and then, but when those highs seem to be a total mystery or not the result of blatant carb-counting snafus, they could be the result of something in your diabetes management that needs some tweaking. Here are 5 common reasons for consistently high blood sugars: Not enough background/basal insulin or oral meds: Whether you’re on a pump, pens or syringes, the number of units you’ve been taking for your background or basal insulin dose can change very easily throughout your life, sometimes without any clear reason. Usually, though, we go through phases of life that impact our background insulin needs such as increased regular stress, decreased activity, weight-gain, consuming more calories/carbohydrates or not getting enough sleep. All of the above are variables that could easily lead your body to needing just a wee bit more insulin in the background or a higher dose of your oral diabetes medications. If your blood sugar seems to be rising even several hours after you’ve eaten or while you’re sleeping, that’s a good sign your meal-time doses need some tweaking with the hep of your diabetes healthcare team! Not enough meal-time insulin: Your meal-time insulin doses can change just as easily as your background insulin doses because of gaining weight, less exercise, more regular stress, more food, etc. If your blood sugar is rising after every meal, and you’re constantly taking correction doses on top of your meal doses, that’s a good sign your meal-time doses need some tweaking with the help of your diabetes healthcare team! (By the way, that means your correction dose Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Faqs

High Blood Sugar Faqs

Find possible causes and solutions for high blood sugar here. Some common causes include: In this section, you will find: Why am I having high blood sugars? Possible causes include: Incorrect carbohydrate counting If your mealtime carbohydrate count is wrong, your insulin dose will be incorrect as well. This is particularly true when eating out or when eating foods that don’t have nutrition labels. The solution: Learn more about carbohydrate counting. Weigh and measure your food whenever possible. Eat foods with carbohydrate counts that you already know. Research nutrition information online for food options at restaurants and chain outlets. “Out-eating” the insulin It’s not always easy to anticipate how much you will actually eat during a meal. However, missing the mark has the same effect as if you miscounted carbohydrates. Moreover, there are individual limits on how much mealtime carbohydrate can realistically be covered. The solution: If you decide to eat more than you planned, you will need to take more insulin to cover the additional carbohydrates. In general it’s wise to limit your mealtime consumption of carbohydrate to less than 60-75g or to whatever has been recommended by your nutritionist. If you have a special occasion coming up, be sure to discuss any special “party meal” or “banquet” medication dose adjustment with your medical provider. Insufficient insulin coverage of the carbohydrate (ie Inadequate insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio) It is important to know how many grams of carbohydrate are covered by one unit of insulin – this is your insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio. If you think the ratio is out of balance, ask yourself these questions. Did you count the carbohydrates correctly? Did you take the proper blood sugar correction dose befor Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

back to Overview Markus, one of our great German-language authors, wrote about struggling with high blood sugar after exercise. I know it's a common problem, and one I've struggled with personally, so I want to make sure you get to see it, too. From Markus Berndt: It’s one of the first recommendations you get after being diagnosed with diabetes. “Get active, do more exercise, it’s good for you!” And since we’ve been a child we’ve heard that exercise is healthy. If we do it consistently we’re rewarded, literally, with an awesome beach body. Adding exercise into our day is also good for our diabetes. We’re taught that exercise lowers blood sugar, right? But can the opposite also be true? Can you have high blood sugar after exercise? Up close We now know that physical activity usually lowers blood sugar because it reduces how much insulin is needed to move sugar into the cells. While, in the past, most experts advised frequent training intervals at moderate intensity, but recent studies have shown that even short, intense workouts are very effective. For example, a 15-minute intense weight training lowered blood sugar even more than what’s seen in some endurance training. So activity lowers blood sugar – but not always! Personally, I experienced this very early on and was extremely irritated! I just learned that exercise lowers blood sugar, but an intense 45-minute run consistently resulted in higher blood sugars than when I started! What in the world? At first, I was confused and felt like I didn’t understand the world anymore. Then it was more of a “would you look at this?” kind of thing. And finally, I was determined to figure out what was happening. I knew there had to be an explanation. Why does exercise sometimes raise blood sugar? Exercise Continue reading >>

What Is High Blood Sugar?

What Is High Blood Sugar?

Have you ever tried to fly a remote control airplane or helicopter? If you steer too sharply one way, your plane will crash into the ground. And if you go too far in the opposite direction, the plane will nose directly upward, making it difficult to control. For people with diabetes, controlling blood sugar levels (or blood glucose levels) is kind of like piloting that plane. To stay in the air and have the most fun, you have to keep blood sugar levels steady. Having a blood sugar level that's too high can make you feel lousy, and having it often can be unhealthy. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and it's carried to each cell through the bloodstream. Hyperglycemia (pronounced: hi-per-gly-SEE-me-uh) is the medical word for high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels happen when the body either can't make insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells of the body where it can be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. Having too much sugar in the blood for long periods of time can cause serious health problems if it's not treated. Hyperglycemia can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, these health problems can occur in adulthood in some Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

If you’ve had diabetes for any length of time at all, you’ve probably seen lists of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose dozens of times. Doctors and diabetes educators hand them out. Hundreds of websites reprint them. Most diabetes books list them. You likely know some of the items on the list by heart: thirst, frequent urination, blurry vision, slow healing of cuts, and more. But have you ever stopped to wonder why these symptoms occur? How does high blood glucose cause frequent urination, make your vision go blurry, or cause all of those other things to happen? Here are some answers to explain what’s going on in your body when you have high blood glucose. Setting the stage for high blood glucose High blood glucose (called hyperglycemia by medical professionals) is the defining characteristic of all types of diabetes. It happens when the body can no longer maintain a normal blood glucose level, either because the pancreas is no longer making enough insulin, or because the body’s cells have become so resistant to insulin that the pancreas cannot keep up, and glucose is accumulating in the bloodstream rather than being moved into the cells. What is high blood sugar? Blood glucose is commonly considered too high if it is higher than 130 mg/dl before a meal or higher than 180 mg/dl two hours after the first bite of a meal. However, most of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose don’t appear until the blood glucose level is higher than 250 mg/dl. Some of the symptoms have a rapid onset, while others require a long period of high blood glucose to set in. It’s important to note that individuals differ in their sensitivity to the effects of high blood glucose: Some people feel symptoms more quickly or more strongly than others. But each sign or sympt Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Diabetes is a disease that causes a person's blood sugar to become too high. This can lead to various complications. A person with diabetes must be careful to keep their blood sugar levels under control. Glucose comes from the food we eat. It is the main source of energy for the body. The pancreas secretes substances, including the hormone insulin, and enzymes. Enzymes break down food. Insulin makes it possible for body cells to absorb the glucose we consume. With diabetes, either the pancreas is unable to produce insulin to help the glucose get into the body cells, or the body becomes resistant to the insulin. The glucose stays in the blood instead. This is what raises blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is known as hyperglycemia. Contents of this article: Causes of blood sugar spikes People with diabetes have to be especially careful about keeping their blood sugar levels under control. There are several reasons why blood glucose levels may spike. These are: Sleep: A lack of sleep can be especially bad for people with diabetes, because it can also raise blood sugar levels. One study performed on Japanese men found that getting under 6.5 hours of sleep each night increases a person's risk for high blood glucose levels. Prioritizing healthy sleep and promoting sleep hygiene are good habits for everyone, but especially for people with diabetes. Stress: When under a lot of stress, the body produces hormones that make it difficult for insulin to do its job, so more glucose stays in the bloodstream. Finding a way to keep stress levels down, such as yoga or meditation, is essential for people with diabetes. Exercise: Having a sedentary lifestyle can cause blood sugar levels to go up. In addition, exercise that is too difficult can cause stress and blood glucose levels to ri Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

Why Is My Blood Glucose So High In The Morning?

Why Is My Blood Glucose So High In The Morning?

I am puzzled by my blood sugar pattern. I am not on any medications. My morning fasting blood sugar is always the highest of the day—between 120 and 140 mg/dl. The rest of the day it is in the normal range. Why does this occur? Continue reading >>

What Causes High Fasting Glucose Readings?

What Causes High Fasting Glucose Readings?

One of the most frustrating things about dealing with diabetes is a high fasting glucose reading. We often think that what we ate for dinner or a nighttime snack is the cause of higher fasting glucose readings, but that’s not the case. In this article, Diane Kress discusses the causes of high fasting readings, how to handle them when they occur and what we can do to prevent them. If last night’s dinner or snack isn’t to blame, then what is? “…fasting readings have much more to do with the liver's release of glycogen during the sleep cycle.” The liver will release glycogen if some level of carbohydrates hasn’t been consumed in over 5 hours. Here are some tips to help you control your fasting readings: · Have a snack before bedtime with approx. 11 grams of carbs. Make sure your carb choice is one that doesn’t normally spike your glucose. · Exercise after dinner. Saving some of your daily exercise for the evening can help lower your fasting glucose readings. · Don’t consume too much alcohol in the evening. Drinking can lower your blood glucose in the short term, but may cause it to spike later on. · Get enough sleep. Stress can affect your blood glucose and too little sleep is a stressor. It’s important to check your glucose as soon as you get up in the morning. If you do see a higher number on your meter in the morning, you should eat something within an hour of rising and don’t skip breakfast! It seems counter-intuitive to eat when our glucose is high, but skipping breakfast will just cause your liver to release more glycogen, causing a vicious circle. As frustrating as a high fasting reading can be, there are some things that we can do to see better results. Don’t give up! You Might Also Like Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hyperglycemia

Nondiabetic Hyperglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is nondiabetic hyperglycemia? Nondiabetic hyperglycemia means your blood glucose (sugar) level is high even though you do not have diabetes. Hyperglycemia may happen suddenly during a major illness or injury. Instead, hyperglycemia may happen over a longer period of time and be caused by a chronic disease. Why is it important to manage hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia can increase your risk for infections, prevent healing, and it make it hard to manage your condition. It is important to treat hyperglycemia to prevent these problems. Hyperglycemia that is not treated can damage your nerves, blood vessels, tissues, and organs. Damage to arteries may increase your risk for heart attack and stroke. Nerve damage may also lead to other heart, stomach, and nerve problems. What increases my risk for nondiabetic hyperglycemia? A medical condition such as Cushing syndrome or polycystic ovarian syndrome Surgery or trauma, such as a burn or injury Infections, such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection Certain medicines, such as steroids or diuretics Nutrition given through a feeding tube or IV A family history of diabetes or gestational diabetes Obesity or a lack of physical activity What are the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia? You may not have any signs or symptoms, or you may have any of the following: More thirst than usual Frequent urination Blurred vision Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain How is nondiabetic hyperglycemia diagnosed and treated? Your healthcare provider will measure your blood sugar level with a blood test. You may be given insulin or other medicines to decrease your blood sugar level. How can I help prevent hyperglycemia? Exercise can help lower your blood sugar when it is high. It also can keep your blood sugar levels steady o Continue reading >>

High Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

High Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

What is high blood glucose? People who do not have diabetes typically have fasting plasma blood glucose levels that run under 126 mg/dl. Your physician will define for you what your target blood glucose should be — identifying a blood glucose target that is as close to normal as possible that you can safely achieve given your overall medical health. In general, high blood glucose, also called 'hyperglycemia', is considered "high" when it is 160 mg/dl or above your individual blood glucose target. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider what he or she thinks is a safe target for you for blood glucose before and after meals. If your blood glucose runs high for long periods of time, this can pose significant problems for you long-term — increased risk of complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks and strokes and more. High blood glucose can pose health problems in the short-term as well. Your treatment plan may need adjustment if the blood glucose stays over 180 mg/dl for 3 days in a row. It is important to aim to keep your blood glucose under control, and treat hyperglycemia when it occurs. What are the symptoms of high blood glucose? Increased thirst Increased urination Dry mouth or skin Tiredness or fatigue Blurred vision More frequent infections Slow healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss What causes high blood glucose? Too much food Too little exercise or physical activity Skipped or not enough diabetes pills or insulin Insulin that has spoiled after being exposed to extreme heat or freezing cold Stress, illness, infection, injury or surgery A blood glucose meter that is not reading accurately What should you do for high blood glucose? Be sure to drink plenty of water. It is recommended to drink a minimum of 8 glasses each day. If yo Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

1 / 11 What Causes Blood Sugar to Rise and Fall? Whether you were recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for several years, you know how fickle blood sugar levels can be, and how important it is that they stay controlled. Proper blood sugar control is key for helping ward off potential diabetes complications, such as kidney disease, nerve damage, vision problems, stroke, and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). If you keep your levels in check on a daily basis, it will help you stay energized, focused, and in a good mood. You’ll know if your diabetes is poorly controlled if you experience symptoms such as frequent urination, sores that won’t heal, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), proper medication, effective meal planning, regular exercise, and use of a blood glucose meter to track your numbers routinely can all help you keep your levels within a healthy range. The ADA recommends blood glucose be 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) before meals, and below 180 mg/dL two hours after the start of a meal. Furthermore, the organization recommends getting an A1C test, which measures your average blood glucose over the past two to three months, at least twice per year if your levels are stable and you are meeting treatment goals. Learning how different habits can cause your blood sugar to fluctuate can help you better predict how your levels will swing. You may be more likely to experience hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar if you have advanced-stage diabetes, according to the ADA. Meanwhile, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, may be caused by factors such as not using enough insulin or other diabetes medication, not following a prop Continue reading >>

Why Blood Sugar Can Be High In The Morning

Why Blood Sugar Can Be High In The Morning

You wouldn’t expect hours of sleep and fasting to leave you with high blood sugar. But elevated morning glucose may be more common than you think. Although it’s not a major problem when it occurs from time to time, consistently high morning levels need your doctor’s attention. Causes of Morning Hyperglycemia High blood glucose in the morning typically occurs due to one of three distinct causes: Dawn Phenomenon The “dawn phenomenon” describes high morning glucose that occurs due to a natural rise in hormone levels. During the early morning hours between about 4 and 8 a.m., your body releases hormones like cortisol and growth hormones to get ready for the day. For reasons experts don’t completely understand, your liver produces extra glucose in response to these hormones. People without diabetes secrete more insulin to handle the extra glucose. But for people with diabetes, blood glucose levels can rise too high. Increased blood sugar due to the dawn phenomenon is usually treated with diabetes medication. If you are on insulin, your insulin levels may need to be changed. The Somogyi Effect It’s possible to experience low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, while sleeping and not even know it. The potentially dangerous problem can occur for a number of different reasons—from not eating enough or taking too much insulin, to drinking too much alcohol. In some people, the body compensates for the hypoglycemia by producing a lot of hormones. This, in turn, causes blood sugar levels to rise. Not everyone wakes in reaction to low blood glucose levels. But being sweaty or having a headache in the morning can be a sign. If you suffer from the Somogyi effect (named after the scientist who first described the condition), your doctor may recommend that you eat a snack befor Continue reading >>

Glycosuria (glucose In Urine) Symptoms, Causes, And Potential Complications

Glycosuria (glucose In Urine) Symptoms, Causes, And Potential Complications

Glycosuria, or glucose in the urine, is the presence of higher than normal levels of sugar in the urine and may be due to complications with your kidneys or diabetes. To learn more about this condition, including symptoms, causes, and prevention strategies, as well as what normal and abnormal levels of glucose in the urine are, continue reading. Glycosuria symptoms Glycosuria may occur with a host of other symptoms, including excessive hunger, fatigue, infections, frequent urination, irritability, increased thirst, issues with vision, slower healing of wounds, tingling sensation in hands and feet, unexplained weight loss, abdominal pain, and in some cases, high blood sugar levels. Difference between blood glucose and glucose in urine Blood glucose is regulated by insulin produced by the pancreas, though in patients with diabetes, the insulin is not produced or processed properly meaning they may need insulin injections to regulate their blood sugar. If left unmanaged, diabetes can cause blood glucose levels to rise and some may enter into the urine. Urine glucose may not always be due to diabetes, and can be a benign symptom that sometimes accompanies pregnancy. Glucose in urine causes Some of the most common causes of glucose in the urine include: Diabetes mellitus: The excess blood glucose levels of people with unmanaged diabetes make it difficult for your kidneys to properly reabsorb the glucose and can cause it to leak into the urine. Hyperthyroidism: Excessive thyroid hormones can cause decreased absorption of glucose that is then passed out of the body through the urine. High sugar diet: Consuming excessive sugar can raise your blood glucose past the level that your kidneys can properly reabsorb, which causes some glucose to be passed into the urine. Benign glycos Continue reading >>

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