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What Can I Give My Dog For Hypoglycemia?

Chihuahua Blood Sugar Problems

Chihuahua Blood Sugar Problems

What is Hypoglycemia in Chihuahuas? Chihuahuas, like many small breeds, have trouble regulating their blood sugar. The first time my Chi suffered an episode of low sugar, I really did not know what was wrong. He was 7 months old, and had a pretty typical day. Then a short time after playing, he started walking like he was drunk. It was as though he had no control over his legs. He threw up foam and then basically fell over. I was beside myself how we could have been playing one minute and into this scene the next. I have always had at least one dog in my life, and my Chihuahua, Norbit was my first small breed of dog and I was not savvy to the hypoglycemia thing. It was on a Sunday, so we wrapped Norbit up in a blanket and went to the emergency vet. They took one look and said my dog had been poisoned. I said that was really impossible, he literally spent zero time unattended. I knew for certain my dog hadn't chewed on anything but his toys. Then another vet tech on duty said, "He is in sugar shock". She had several Chihuahuas at home herself she had rescued and she said low blood sugar wasn't uncommon in small breeds. She put some Karo syrup on a flat wooden stick and he just stared at it glassy-eyed like he had no idea how to lick. So she put roughly a teaspoon of the syrup in a syringe and while explaining I should never do this at home as he could choke, he gently pushed the syrup right down this throat. He was seriously right as rain in a very short time. It was extremely frightening however and I vowed to do my best that my dog never experienced this again by learning why it happened and what I needed to do to prevent it. What Symptoms Will My Chihuahua Have? In the case of my dog, his low blood sugar was caused by a play session that went on a little too long and Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Click on the appropriate tab to view more information: Possible Causes of Hypoglycemia in Dogs Blood sugar levels are regulated by a complex interaction of hormones and other bodily processes. Canine hypoglycemia can be caused by abnormal hormonal functions or by the inability of the dog's body to store sufficient amount of blood glucose. These abnormalities in turn can be the result of any of the following: Insulinoma The pancreas produces insulin which causes blood sugar levels to decrease. Insulinomas are tumors formed by cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. Insulinomas can cause an increase in insulin production, resulting in low blood sugar levels. Insulin overdose If an excessive amount of insulin is administered to a dog with diabetes, the dog will suffer from hypoglycemia. Toy Breed Hypoglycemia Some toy breeds (such as Chihuahuas, Yorkshire Terriers, Maltese, Toy Poodles and Pomeranian) are prone to hypoglycemia due to a metabolic disorder. If you have a toy breed dog, it is better to feed her 3 small meals a day to avoid hypoglycemia. Puppy Hypoglycemia Puppies, especially toy breed puppies less than 5 months of age, are predisposed to developing hypoglycemia because they are less able to store and mobilize glucose the way that adult dogs do. Also, toy breed puppies have more brain mass per body weight compared to other breeds and therefore need more glucose for brain function. In puppies, certain situations can bring on a hypoglycemic attack. For example, when the puppy misses a meal, becomes chilled, or is suffering from exhaustion, or anxiety. Sometimes when a puppy gets older, she will outgrow this condition since canine hypoglycemia mostly affects puppies 5 to 16 weeks of age. However, if the dog is high strung, or has a lot of nervous energy, she Continue reading >>

Dog Hypoglycemia (toy Breed)

Dog Hypoglycemia (toy Breed)

Dog Hypoglycemia (Toy Breed): toy dog breeds are becoming more and more remarkably popular these days as people move into small apartments and condos and need small dogs that adapt well to city life. A toy dog breed may easily fit into a purse and can be easily carried around while shopping. However, owners of toy breeds must be aware of the fact that some of them may suffer from bouts of hypoglycemia that may require prompt veterinary attention. While bouts of hypoglycemia mostly affect toy breed dogs as puppies, some of them may still suffer from this condition as adults. Common Dog Toy Breeds Prone to Hypoglycemia: Chihuahua Yorkshire Terrier Pomeranian Maltese Causes of Toy Breed Hypoglycemia The problem with toy breed dogs is that being so small they tend to have difficulties in maintaining their blood glucose levels normal. This is due to the fact that they have a low body mass and therefore they have a tougher time in storing glucose properly. They also are prone to chilling quickly due to the fact that they have little body fat. Clinical discussion on the importance of self-monitoring of blood glucose levels. Ad Healio.com Learn more While toy breed dogs may develop hypoglycemia simply because of their constitution, in some cases there may be other underlying causes that may need addressed. For instance, stress, diarrhea, parasites, liver shunt, and bacterial infections may be triggering causes of a hypoglycemic attack. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia in Toy Dog Breeds The following symptoms often are a red flag of low blood glucose in toy breed dogs: Lethargy Drowsiness Shakiness Incoordination Slow heart beat Cold temperature Loss of consciousness Seizures Other warning signs of hypoglycemia are cold, pale gums. Normal gums are warm and of nice healthy bubble gum pin Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Remember, your health guarantee does NOT cover hypoglycemia so it is imperative you read this information closely and stay on top of things. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar (sometimes called "sugar shock") is a condition where the blood sugar level drops to an extremely low level due to lack of food, or by using up all stored energy without it being replenished. (Such as when your puppy plays for an extended period of time without eating.) The most common trigger is stress (such as going to a new home). Teacups and Tiny Toys can be prone to hypoglycemia because they have such tiny digestive systems. They can only store a small amount of food (energy) in their stomach at one time. Their liver and pancreas which are necessary for digestion and sugar balance are also small and usually underdeveloped as well. Most puppies tend to grow out of hypoglycemia as they get older. As they grow, so do their major organs. This makes them more able to utilize and to process the food that they eat so it can sustain them for longer periods of time. REMEMBER: to prevent hypoglycemia, puppies need to eat several small meals a day. It is much easier to prevent by always having a readily available food supply, than to have to treat it once it happens. It is very scary to see a puppy that you love so dearly in "sugar shock." Symptoms and Treatment Symptoms of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can occur without warning in a healthy puppy and can be a very scary thing! So it is best to know what to look for! Your puppy may exhibit one or more of these signs: The first sign that is usually seen is vomiting on an empty stomach. (clear liquid) If your teacup has not eaten in a while, and vomits without acting sick, give them food, Nutri-Cal or Karo syrup immediately! Some other signs are acting listles Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar

What is Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar)? 1. The brain requires glucose (blood sugar) for normal functioning, and unlike many other organs, the brain has a very limited ability to store glucose. As such, the brain is the organ that is most affected when blood sugar gets too low. 2. Low blood sugar can cause seizures 3. Puppies - especially small breed puppies - are particularly susceptible to low blood sugar because their liver is not able to store sufficient amounts of glycogen, as compared with older dogs. 4. Hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening - even fatal - condition, and is known to be a cause of canine seizures. The occurrence of symptoms depends on how far, and how fast, the blood sugar has dropped 5. Treating Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar): During an attack of hypoglycemia your goal is to stay calm, to bring the blood glucose back to a safe level, to continue to observe your dog. You can contact your veterinarian if you feel you need to. These are general guidelines for treating hypoglycemia. Ask your veterinarian for information that is specific to your dog. Severe hypoglycemia: If your dog is severely hypoglycemic, especially if it is having seizures or unconscious, you must give Haggen-Dazs vanilla ice cream immediately. Carefully rub small amounts of ice cream on the inside of the cheeks and gums. Do not put a lot of liquid in the dog's mouth, and be sure the dog does not choke. Do not stick your fingers inside the teeth of a dog that is having seizures - you may get bitten. Then, call your veterinarian if you feel you need further guidance. If your dog continues to be unconscious your dog should be taken to the veterinary emergency room immediately. Moderate hypoglycemia: Haggen-Dazs plain vanilla ice cream should be given, either alone, or combined with f Continue reading >>

Treatment And Prognosis For Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Treatment And Prognosis For Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Treatment Options The main goals of treating hypoglycemia are to identify and eliminate the underlying cause of the dog’s low blood sugar. If the dog is having seizures at home, the veterinarian may recommend that the owner rub Karo syrup, corn syrup, sugar, fruit juices or honey on its gums, followed by a small meal once the dog is stable and no longer seizing. Dogs with observable signs of hypoglycemia usually will be treated in the veterinary clinic on an inpatient basis, at least initially. If the dog can eat, it will be fed frequent small meals in an attempt to raise its blood sugar levels directly. If the animal cannot eat on its own, the veterinarian probably will administer intravenous fluids, with the addition of up to 50% dextrose as a sugar component, in small amounts slowly over time. Surgery may be necessary if a pancreatic beta cell tumor (insulinoma) or a portosystemic shunt is identified. Many dogs with hypoglycemia caused by overuse of glucose, such as hunting dogs, toy breeds and newborn puppies, may be able to recover simply by increasing the frequency of their meals and enriching the nutritional composition of their diets with added fat, protein and complex carbohydrates. Simple sugars should be avoided as part of the diet in most cases. Warning: 3 Foods to Avoid These 3 Foods Should Come with a Warning Label Nucific When dogs are hypoglycemic due to an underlying disorder, such as liver disease or low levels of adrenal gland hormones, that disorder must be treated directly in order to resolve the low blood sugar levels. If the underlying disorder cannot be corrected or cured, the dog may need to be on long-term therapy designed to keep its blood glucose levels elevated, probably for life. This often is the case when dogs have pancreatic or liver c Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Requires Quick Intervention In Toy Breeds

Hypoglycemia Requires Quick Intervention In Toy Breeds

Toy-breed dogs are not only at risk for hypoglycemia, they can die from the low blood sugar disorder if they do not receive prompt treatment. When a dog’s blood sugar, or glucose, level drops, it can affect neurological function. Disorientation, tremors and coma may occur. Normally, hormones stimulate the breakdown of stored glycogen to supply the brain and other tissues with fuel. In toy breeds, this process may not happen fast enough, and hypoglycemia results. Juvenile hypoglycemia occurs in puppies less than 3 months of age. Because puppies have not fully developed the ability to regulate blood glucose concentration and have a high requirement for glucose, they are vulnerable. Stress, cold, malnutrition and intestinal parasites also may trigger juvenile hypoglycemia. Signs of hypoglycemia are loss of appetite, extreme lethargy, lack of coordination, trembling, muscle twitching, weakness, seizures, and discoloration of skin and gums. Most dogs will not eat or drink when they are in low sugar shock. Simple cases of hypoglycemia can occur when a dog is overly active with too much time between meals or fasts before vigourous exercise. Hypoglycemia also may occur secondary to another condition. Other causes include Addison’s disease, insulin-producing tumors of the pancreas, severe liver disease, and glycogen storage diseases. If an underlying illness causes hypoglycemia, veterinarians first treat this condition. Veterinarians are likely to conduct a complete medical history and physical examination to determine the cause in dogs that develop chronic hypoglycemia. Other tests include a complete blood count, blood glucose concentration, urinalysis, routine biochemistry, and blood insulin concentration. An ultrasound may be taken of the abdomen to try and identify a pan Continue reading >>

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Signs Treatment Asymptomatic Hypo Be Prepared (how to carry a sugar supply) Exercise and hypo. Nigel Goes Hypo Hypo Humor References The most serious side effect of too much insulin is hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose. Hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening, even fatal condition. Classic signs of hypoglycemia lethargy (lack of energy) weakness head tilting "drunkedness" - wobbling when walking, unbalanced hunger restlessness shivering ataxia - usually lack of muscular coordination, but maybe changes in head and neck movements disorientation stupor convulsions or seizures coma The occurrence of signs depends on how far the bg drops and on how fast the blood glucose drops. Owners of diabetic cats have also reported observing these signs sleepiness unable to wake the cat easily when it is sleeping. vomiting glassy eyes - it may look like it is staring into space laying, sleeping, or curled up in an unusual location of the house meowing, crying, yowling, or vocalizing in a way that is unusual for your cat some cats get aggressive drooling coughing Owners of diabetic dogs have also reported observing these signs sweating - check the nose and the paw pads. lip smacking or licking getting physically "stuck" in a place where the pet normally could get itself out (for example, behind a partially closed door that a pet would usually nudge open.) Some animals are asymptomatic at very low bg values. This means they do not show any of the usual signs of hypoglycemia even though their bg is very low. Read experiences of three pets who have had episodes of asymptomatic hypoglycemia. Be Prepared Always have corn syrup or sugar available. Corn syrup works well because it is a very pure sugar, and it is liquid. In the U.S. "Karo" is a brand name of corn syrup and you'll often see this Continue reading >>

Emergency Treatment For Hypoglycemia & Seizures In Dogs

Emergency Treatment For Hypoglycemia & Seizures In Dogs

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is one of many causes of seizures in dogs. It occurs most commonly in young puppies of small breed dogs but can also occur secondary to other disease processes in older dogs. Emergency first aid for a dog with hypoglycemia requires administering a high-sugar substance orally, but you'll need to do so carefully to avoid hurting yourself or your dog. Blood Sugar Deficiency Hypoglycemia results when blood sugar levels fall below a normal range. Blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, is important for all cellular function because it is converted into energy by the cells of the body. The brain has an especially high demand for glucose, so when blood glucose levels fall severely, seizure activity can occur in the brain. In addition to glucose circulating in the blood, the body packages some glucose into storage molecules called glycogen that are stored in skeletal muscle and the liver. These glycogen stores can be rapidly broken down into glucose molecules during exercise and other periods of high energy demand. Emergency First Aid for Hypoglycemia Initial symptoms of hypoglycemia in dogs and puppies include weakness, depression, staggering, or trembling. Feeding a small amount of a sugar-rich food such as vanilla ice cream, Karo syrup or honey can rapidly improve the animal's condition. If the dog is not coherent enough to eat, rubbing a small amount of one of these substances on the gums will help -- but be careful to avoid being bitten. Never feed chocolate to a dog, as chocolate causes toxicity in dogs. If a dog is having a hypoglycemic seizure, do not put your fingers in the dog's mouth; often, a dog will chomp his jaws involuntarily. Instead, use something else to squirt a small amount of a sugary substance into the mouth, such as ho Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog: Tips To Manage His Diet

Diabetic Dog: Tips To Manage His Diet

So, your dog has diabetes. Take a deep breath. With good care, your companion can lead a long, healthy life. Like humans, when dogs have diabetes, staying trim is key. If your dog is overweight, losing some pounds can help his cells better use insulin, a hormone that keeps blood sugar levels in check. That makes it easier for his body to turn food into fuel. The goal for any pooch with diabetes is to keep blood sugar (or glucose) levels as close to normal as possible. This helps your dog feel good and makes it less likely he'll get diabetes-related complications, such as vision-clouding cataracts and urinary tract infections. Your veterinarian will determine how many calories your dog needs every day, based on his weight and activity level. Once you know that number, it's important to keep a close eye on what he eats and how much. Researchers are still exploring what diet is best for dogs with diabetes. Most vets recommend a high-fiber, low-fat diet. Fiber slows the entrance of glucose into the bloodstream and helps your dog feel full. Low-fat foods have fewer calories. Together, the diet can help your dog eat less and lose weight. But make sure your pooch drinks plenty of water. Fiber takes water from the body, and that can cause constipation and other problems. Most dogs do fine with food you can buy at the store. But your vet may recommend prescription dog food or a homemade diet developed by a veterinary nutritionist. Your vet can tell you the best way to go about changing your dog's food. Even the best diet won’t help if your dog doesn’t eat it, though -- and you can't give insulin to a dog on an empty stomach. It can make him very sick. If your dog isn't eating as much, it could be because he doesn't like the food. It could also mean he has another problem, or Continue reading >>

Can You Give Sugar Water To A Puppy?

Can You Give Sugar Water To A Puppy?

Puppies, especially small or toy breeds, are susceptible to low blood sugar, a condition that can be treated with sugar water. Dangerously low sugar levels in a puppy can result in seizure and death. Sugar water is a life-saving treatment for puppies whose immature systems fail to regulate glucose, a condition called hypoglycemia. Puppies less than 4 months old are most likely to require sugar water as a dietary supplement. Sugar water for puppies can be made with white table sugar, Karo syrup, honey or Nutri-Cal. Mix the sugar product with water and feed to the puppy with an eyedropper or rub on the tongue and gums. Puppies that suffer from hypoglycemia and are in urgent need of sugar water will exhibit weakness, listlessness, trembling and disorientation. Without sugar water, hypoglycemia can advance very quickly to lifelessness, seizures and death. Many breeders recommend that puppies be offered sugar water, or other sweetened water, every day until they are at least 4 months old. It is also important to feed puppies a well-balanced puppy food every four hours. The suggested daily dose of sugar water for puppies is 2 tablespoons of honey (or equivalent sweetener) with 1/2 cup of water. Puppies can also be fed two tablespoons of peanut butter mixed with honey or Karo syrup, in small increments over the course of a day. Small breeds, like Chihuahuas and Yorkshire Terriers, are most susceptible to hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can cause death very quickly in a puppy; call a veterinarian immediately if sugar water does not immediately resuscitate the puppy. Continue reading >>

The Many Causes Of Hypoglycemia In Dogs And Cats

The Many Causes Of Hypoglycemia In Dogs And Cats

Hypoglycemia is when your pet's blood sugar drops and becomes too low. Find out here the causes, symptoms and treatment options available to pets whose glucose levels tend to rise and fall. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a potentially life-threatening situation for a dog or cat. Your pet’s blood sugar, or glucose, is their primary source of energy. When glucose levels drop below normal, it results in a loss of energy and decreased ability to function. In severe cases, a pet may lose consciousness or even die. Hypoglycemia is not a disease. It is instead a symptom that points to an underlying medical condition. Here we will look at the causes of hypoglycemia in dogs and cats, and what symptoms to watch for in your pet. There are many causes of hypoglycemia in pets, but the most common is related to diabetes treatment. Diabetes occurs when the body is not able to properly produce or process insulin, the hormone that allows glucose to travel to cells and transform into energy. Without insulin, the glucose remains in the bloodstream, and this is what is referred to as high blood sugar. Insulin injections are given to diabetic pets in order to even out blood sugar levels. However, if a pet parent accidentally gives their pet too much of the drug, it can cause the body to metabolize too much glucose, resulting in low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. Glucose can also be over-metabolized as a result of insulin-secreting tumors or conditions that require a great deal of energy from the pet, including certain cancers, infection, sepsis, and pregnancy. While the most common, over-metabolization of glucose is not the only cause of hypoglycemia. Low blood sugar can also occur due to decreased production of glucose by the liver (often caused by liver disease, liver shunts, or Ad Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hypoglycemia Q: Dear Dr. Richards, Thank you very much for the information on stroke and vestibular syndrome. I have another question. (My Vet is still on vacation.) Is it possible that my Yorkie's stroke-like symptoms could be caused by hypoglycemia or an electrolyte imbalance? (She suffered a week long bout of vomiting and diarrhea prior to her symptoms.) After this was suggested to me, I started giving her a little sugar in her food and water. She does seem to be feeling better and walking more normally. Although, she still seems to be a little disoriented. If hypoglycemia is possible, what is the proper way to treat this? Again, thank you very much, Debra A: Debra- It is possible for disorientation, weakness and even seizures to occur with hypoglycemia. Small breeds are more likely to become hypoglycemic from illnesses than larger breeds but most older dogs do not have much problems with this whether they are large or small. Older dogs do have problems with insulin producing tumors of the pancreas sometimes, though. This is probably the most common cause of hypoglycemia in older dogs. A temporary fix is to feed several small meals a day rather than one or two large ones. That would help until your vet got back. Then the best thing to do would be a general lab panel or blood glucose test (but I'd run the whole panel most of the time) and check for hypoglycemia. If it is present then checking another sample is a good idea. Then checking the insulin/glucose ratio on a blood sample would be a more definitive test for excess insulin. Insulinomas can be treated surgically or medically but surgery has a chance of curing the dog and medical treatment doesn't. Good luck with this. Peripheral vestibular syndrome clears up in most cases spontaneously so response to therapy for Continue reading >>

How To Treat Hypoglycemia In Cats And Dogs

How To Treat Hypoglycemia In Cats And Dogs

Hypoglycemia is a condition where your pet's glucose levels, better known as blood sugar drops dangerously low. Luckily, there are treatment levels out there if diagnosed in a timely manner. Learn more about hypoglycemia here. When your pet’s blood sugar drops below normal, it can spell serious trouble for their health. Blood sugar, or glucose, is the main source of energy for both the body and the brain. Without adequate amounts of glucose, your pet cannot function properly. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can cause loss of consciousness, coma, and even death. Fortunately, there are treatment options available, and the sooner you seek treatment for your pet, the more likely they are to recover. Read on to learn about the diagnosis and treatment of hypoglycemia in cats and dogs. Diagnosing Hypoglycemia in Cats and Dogs Contact your veterinarian if your pet ever exhibits symptoms of hypoglycemia. Your vet will perform a physical examination, take a full health history, and perform certain diagnostic tests. Most cases of hypoglycemia are easily diagnosed through routine blood work that reveals low glucose levels. The more challenging part of diagnosis is figuring out the source of the condition. Exploratory testing may include: Blood chemistry to assess liver, kidney, and pancreatic health Complete blood count to check for blood conditions Urinalysis to evaluate the kidneys and check for urinary tract infection or other diseases Thyroid test to see if there is a problem with thyroid hormone production X-ray or ultrasound to search for tumors, liver shunts, or liver abnormalities Treatment for Hypoglycemia in Cats and Dogs Treatment for hypoglycemia is usually a two-pronged attack: blood sugar levels must be raised immediately the underlying cause of the condition must be Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is what every diabetic fears -- very low blood glucose. Since the brain requires glucose for fuel at every second, it's possible to induce coma, seizures,brain damage[1][2][3] and death by letting blood glucose drop too low. Because the brain is almost totally dependent on glucose to make use of oxygen[4], it is somewhat like having severe breathing problems. Though the causes and mechanisms are different, in both cases the brain does not have enough oxygen, and similar symptoms and problems can occur. It is caused by giving too much insulin for the body's current needs. The blood glucose level at which an animal (or person) is dangerously hypoglycemic is fuzzy, and depends on several factors.[5] The line is different for diabetics and non-diabetics, and differs between individuals and depending on exogenous insulin and what the individual is accustomed to. The most likely time for an acute hypoglycemia episode is when the insulin is working hardest, or at its peak; mild lows may cause lethargy and sleepiness[6]. An acute hypoglycemic episode can happen even if you are careful, since pets' insulin requirements sometimes change without warning. Pets and people can have hypoglycemic episodes because of increases to physical activity. What makes those with diabetes prone to hypoglycemia is that muscles require glucose for proper function. The more active muscles become, the more their need for glucose increases[7]. Conversely, there can also be hyperglycemic reactions from this; it depends on the individual/caregiver knowing him/herself and the pet's reactions. According to a 2000 JAVMA study, dogs receiving insulin injections only once daily at high doses[9] are more likely to have hypoglycemic episodes than those who receive insulin twice daily. The symptoms Continue reading >>

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