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What Can I Give My Dog For Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is what every diabetic fears -- very low blood glucose. Since the brain requires glucose for fuel at every second, it's possible to induce coma, seizures,brain damage[1][2][3] and death by letting blood glucose drop too low. Because the brain is almost totally dependent on glucose to make use of oxygen[4], it is somewhat like having severe breathing problems. Though the causes and mechanisms are different, in both cases the brain does not have enough oxygen, and similar symptoms and problems can occur. It is caused by giving too much insulin for the body's current needs. The blood glucose level at which an animal (or person) is dangerously hypoglycemic is fuzzy, and depends on several factors.[5] The line is different for diabetics and non-diabetics, and differs between individuals and depending on exogenous insulin and what the individual is accustomed to. The most likely time for an acute hypoglycemia episode is when the insulin is working hardest, or at its peak; mild lows may cause lethargy and sleepiness[6]. An acute hypoglycemic episode can happen even if you are careful, since pets' insulin requirements sometimes change without warning. Pets and people can have hypoglycemic episodes because of increases to physical activity. What makes those with diabetes prone to hypoglycemia is that muscles require glucose for proper function. The more active muscles become, the more their need for glucose increases[7]. Conversely, there can also be hyperglycemic reactions from this; it depends on the individual/caregiver knowing him/herself and the pet's reactions. According to a 2000 JAVMA study, dogs receiving insulin injections only once daily at high doses[9] are more likely to have hypoglycemic episodes than those who receive insulin twice daily. The symptoms Continue reading >>

Dog Hypoglycemia (toy Breed)

Dog Hypoglycemia (toy Breed)

Dog Hypoglycemia (Toy Breed): toy dog breeds are becoming more and more remarkably popular these days as people move into small apartments and condos and need small dogs that adapt well to city life. A toy dog breed may easily fit into a purse and can be easily carried around while shopping. However, owners of toy breeds must be aware of the fact that some of them may suffer from bouts of hypoglycemia that may require prompt veterinary attention. While bouts of hypoglycemia mostly affect toy breed dogs as puppies, some of them may still suffer from this condition as adults. Common Dog Toy Breeds Prone to Hypoglycemia: Chihuahua Yorkshire Terrier Pomeranian Maltese Causes of Toy Breed Hypoglycemia The problem with toy breed dogs is that being so small they tend to have difficulties in maintaining their blood glucose levels normal. This is due to the fact that they have a low body mass and therefore they have a tougher time in storing glucose properly. They also are prone to chilling quickly due to the fact that they have little body fat. Clinical discussion on the importance of self-monitoring of blood glucose levels. Ad Healio.com Learn more While toy breed dogs may develop hypoglycemia simply because of their constitution, in some cases there may be other underlying causes that may need addressed. For instance, stress, diarrhea, parasites, liver shunt, and bacterial infections may be triggering causes of a hypoglycemic attack. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia in Toy Dog Breeds The following symptoms often are a red flag of low blood glucose in toy breed dogs: Lethargy Drowsiness Shakiness Incoordination Slow heart beat Cold temperature Loss of consciousness Seizures Other warning signs of hypoglycemia are cold, pale gums. Normal gums are warm and of nice healthy bubble gum pin Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Dogs That Sense Low Blood Sugar

Type 1 Diabetes: Dogs That Sense Low Blood Sugar

Forensic scientist Mark Ruefenacht, who has type 1 diabetes, tells Diabetes Health publisher Nadia Al-Samarrie how he realized that dogs can be a major defense against life-threatening episodes of hypoglycemia. That insight led him to found Dogs for Diabetics (“D4D”), a Concord, California-based organization that trains dogs to alert their masters when they sense low blood sugar. D4D’s website is located at www.dogs4diabetics.com/ Nadia: How did you discover that dogs can sense low blood sugar? Mark: In 1999, when I was on a business trip to New York City, a guide dog puppy, Benton, aroused me in the middle of the night from a low blood sugar incident, allowing me to get help. Whether Benton reacted to a change in scent or in the symptoms that I was exhibiting is unknown; however, that incident resulted in my idea of training a dog for this purpose. Based on my background in forensic science, I am familiar with blood alcohol devices, which can differentiate an alcohol-based problem from a low blood sugar event. I then spent several years studying dog scent training protocols for drugs, bombs, and search and rescue, as well as cancer detection. Along with extensive experimentation regarding the diabetic scent, I proved the capabilities of the dogs, and I developed a series of protocols that have been further tested over the last several years with well over 100 dogs. D4D currently supports over 80 client teams. Our longest working dog is Armstrong, with over eight years of alerting experience. Nadia: Does a dog have to feel a connection with a person to detect low blood sugar? Mark: There are many characteristics that make a dog successful in a working relationship that provides this type of medical alert. One of them is the bond he develops with his companion. How Continue reading >>

Give Me Some Sugar! Canine Low Blood Sugar–symptoms And Treatments

Give Me Some Sugar! Canine Low Blood Sugar–symptoms And Treatments

There is a dog blood-glucose disorder that goes by three names: Canine Hypoglycemia , Exertional Hypoglycemia and Sugar Fits. These names refer to one single condition: cells in your canine’s body aren’t receiving the needed amount of glucose. Your dog’s energy is derived from glucose that is supplied by the blood, but with Canine Hypoglycemia, blood glucose levels lower than 70 mg/dL should be cause for concern and are considered increasingly dangerous, of course, as the numbers go down. The normal level is 70-150 mg/dL. Different factors enter into the cause, but if you suspect your beloved family member might be diabetic, it’s important to have your canine-cutie diagnosed properly, and quickly, since untreated hypoglycemia can, ultimately, result in seizure/coma and death. Symptoms Of Canine Hypoglycemia: Disorientation or confusion Trembling lip Seizures (dogs 4 or over are more prone) Weakness-shakiness-dizziness Anxiety Lack-luster personality/lethargy/depression Prevention/Treatment: Obviously, the goal is to raise your pet’s blood-sugar level or maintain normal sugar levels; and this can be achieved in several ways: Feed your pet smaller, more frequent meals. There is a food supplement known as PetAlive GlucoBalance which aides in pancreatic and liver functions. Smaller meals, plus the PetAlive, can potentially correct the problem, but a blood test from your pet’s vet is required to properly determine if this regime-change will have made a difference. Treats should be avoided, at this time, unless permitted by your dog’s doctor. If you suspect your canine’s blood sugar is low, visiting the vet is crucial. The vet will, automatically, check blood-sugar levels. If necessary, a form of glucose will be fed intravenously -directly into the bloodstream Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

Hypoglycemia in dogs is the condition of having low blood sugar, which results in symptoms that mostly relate to an affected dog’s energy level. It can be caused by underlying conditions or exposure to certain substances. When it becomes severe, hypoglycemia can cause pain, seizures, unconsciousness, and even death in canines. Sugar, which takes the form of glucose, provides energy for your dog’s entire body. When the blood sugar level is too low, it will eventually affect the organs and brain function. That’s why it is important to consult your veterinarian if you see signs that your dog might be hypoglycemic. Here is what you should know about the symptoms, causes, and treatments for hypoglycemia in dogs. Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia In Dogs Symptoms of hypoglycemia in dogs usually begin mildly with signs of low energy, but the condition can progress to more dangerous symptoms quickly if left untreated. Sometimes these symptoms come and go, while other times they are persistent. If you spot the following signs that your dog is hypoglycemic, you should take them to the vet immediately. Lethargy Slow response to stimuli Weakness Loss of coordination Increased thirst or urination Decreased or increased appetite Weight gain Muscle spasms Trembling Irregular heart rate or breathing Paralysis of the hind legs Seizures Blindness Collapse or unconsciousness Causes Of Hypoglycemia In Dogs Hypoglycemia in dogs can be caused by a number of underlying conditions, or it can be the result of exposure to certain substances. It results from glucose being removed from the bloodstream, an inadequate amount of glucose from diet, or low production of glucose from glycogen stores by the liver. Any condition that affects glucose levels could result in hypoglycemia. Here are several known Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Can Kill A Puppy

Low Blood Sugar Can Kill A Puppy

“Puppy Passed Out, Shaking, Won’t Get Up!” A 12-week-old female Maltese puppy curled up in an unnatural position in the middle of a dirty pink kitchen towel. Slimey drool and corn syrup stuck all over her chin and her whiskers. Her little eyes shut tightly, she barely breathed. Then her paw twitched spastically. (There is no picture of this because Yours Truli, VirtuaVet, was running down the hospital hallway to the treatment room, “Get the Dextrose solution and the I.V., STAT!” No time for pictures when a little life is on the line.) Shasta needed sugar desperately to keep her brain functioning. The body itself can run on replacement molecules, for example: ketones. The brain, however, needs glucose, a particular kind of sugar easily obtainable from food. If the brain does not receive the glucose it needs, the symptoms of low blood sugar rear up. After 15 minutes, her eyes open, breathing smooths, seizures subside, and a puppy might look like Shasta did: Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar in a Puppy (or Rabbit, or Kitten, or…) Weakness Confusion Incoordination Falling Over Tremors, Spastic Movements, Falling Over Twitches, Seizures Coma Death Dog Breeds Likely to Become Hypoglycemic Yorkshire Terrier Chihuahua Maltese Toy Poodle Shih Tzu Miniature Pinscher Toy Terrier Papillon Japanese Chin Pomeranian any tiny breed destined for 10 pounds or less full grown… Low Blood Sugar Treatment Your puppy will perk right up with glucose in its system. Sources of Sugar for your Puppy in an Emergency: NutriCal Karo syrup (corn syrup) Molasses Maple syrup (pancake syrup, too) Barley Malt Brown Rice Syrup If your puppy gets to the veterinarian before you know what’s going on, the veterinarian will give dextrose, a clean, safe, medical form of sugar that is given by mouth or Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormal decrease of glucose concentration in the blood, or more simply - low blood sugar levels. A normal blood glucose value for healthy, non-diabetic dogs is 3.3-6.1 mmol/L. Hypoglycemia occurs when excessive glucose consumption depletes the reserves of glucose in the body. Hypoglycemia can be a result of endocrine or hepatic disorders, a higher energy requirement for glucose, lack of glucose due to fasting, or toxicity. Hypoglycemia will leave dogs feeling weak and groggy. If left untreated, unconsciousness followed by death will result. Hypoglycemia is defined as a low blood sugar concentration. As sugar (in the form of glucose) is the primary energy source in the body, low blood sugar levels will ultimately affect organ and brain function. Symptoms of hypoglycemia will usually begin with low energy and a delayed response time, if left to progress further these symptoms will develop into more serious signs such as seizures and collapse. Potential symptoms include: Loss of appetite Lethargy (low energy) Slow response time Unusual behaviour Polyuria (increased urination) Polydipsia (increased thirst) Lack of coordination Partial paralysis of hindquarters Weakness Exercise intolerance Trembling Involuntary twitching Seizures Unconsciousness Hypoglycemia can be the result of underlying endocrine or hepatic disorders, sudden increase in the use of glucose by the body, inadequate amounts of glucose, or toxicity. Causes include: Abnormal growth of pancreatic cells Cancer in the liver or gastrointestinal system Inflammation of the liver Portosystemic shunt Glycogen-storage disease Excessive strenuous exercise Overuse of glucose in the body during pregnancy Reduced intake of glucose due to starvation or malnutrition Delayed time between meals in ki Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low blood sugar can affect puppies much more often than adult dogs, even when your puppy is healthy, so it's important to learn about low blood sugar symptoms and what to do. The technical term is hypoglycemia and happens most often with adult pets that suffer from diabetes. Sugar moves into the cells with the help of insulin, and too much insulin can cause hypoglycemia. Puppies almost never have diabetes, but can develop low blood sugar due to intestinal parasites that compromise digestion. Very small puppies, especially Toy breeds like the Chihuahua or Pomeranian, are so tiny, they have very few fat stores. Fat is body fuel, and when there’s not enough, the blood sugar levels fall. Adult pets can make up this difference when their liver churns out the necessary sugar. But immature livers can’t manufacture enough necessary sugar and as a result, these tiny pups develop hypoglycemia. What Are Low Blood Sugar Symptoms? The signs of low blood sugar can be vague. It’s important to watch out for them especially if your puppy is a tiny breed that’s most susceptible. Without enough sugar, the puppy’s heartbeat rate and breathing slow down and that triggers a cascade effect of other symptoms. Be alert for any one or combination of the following signs. The puppy acts weak. The puppy becomes sleepy. The puppy seems disoriented. He develops a wobbly “drunk” gait. His eyes look ‘glassy’ and unfocused. The puppy starts to twitch, shake or tremble/shiver. His head tilts to one side. He develops seizures. The puppy falls unconscious and can’t be awakened. Without prompt attention and first aid, your puppy could die. But fortunately, when you recognize the signs early in the process, low blood sugar is easy to treat and reverse at home. In almost all cases, the pup Continue reading >>

Chihuahua Blood Sugar Problems

Chihuahua Blood Sugar Problems

What is Hypoglycemia in Chihuahuas? Chihuahuas, like many small breeds, have trouble regulating their blood sugar. The first time my Chi suffered an episode of low sugar, I really did not know what was wrong. He was 7 months old, and had a pretty typical day. Then a short time after playing, he started walking like he was drunk. It was as though he had no control over his legs. He threw up foam and then basically fell over. I was beside myself how we could have been playing one minute and into this scene the next. I have always had at least one dog in my life, and my Chihuahua, Norbit was my first small breed of dog and I was not savvy to the hypoglycemia thing. It was on a Sunday, so we wrapped Norbit up in a blanket and went to the emergency vet. They took one look and said my dog had been poisoned. I said that was really impossible, he literally spent zero time unattended. I knew for certain my dog hadn't chewed on anything but his toys. Then another vet tech on duty said, "He is in sugar shock". She had several Chihuahuas at home herself she had rescued and she said low blood sugar wasn't uncommon in small breeds. She put some Karo syrup on a flat wooden stick and he just stared at it glassy-eyed like he had no idea how to lick. So she put roughly a teaspoon of the syrup in a syringe and while explaining I should never do this at home as he could choke, he gently pushed the syrup right down this throat. He was seriously right as rain in a very short time. It was extremely frightening however and I vowed to do my best that my dog never experienced this again by learning why it happened and what I needed to do to prevent it. What Symptoms Will My Chihuahua Have? In the case of my dog, his low blood sugar was caused by a play session that went on a little too long and Continue reading >>

How To Treat Hypoglycemia In Cats And Dogs

How To Treat Hypoglycemia In Cats And Dogs

Hypoglycemia is a condition where your pet's glucose levels, better known as blood sugar drops dangerously low. Luckily, there are treatment levels out there if diagnosed in a timely manner. Learn more about hypoglycemia here. When your pet’s blood sugar drops below normal, it can spell serious trouble for their health. Blood sugar, or glucose, is the main source of energy for both the body and the brain. Without adequate amounts of glucose, your pet cannot function properly. In severe cases, hypoglycemia can cause loss of consciousness, coma, and even death. Fortunately, there are treatment options available, and the sooner you seek treatment for your pet, the more likely they are to recover. Read on to learn about the diagnosis and treatment of hypoglycemia in cats and dogs. Diagnosing Hypoglycemia in Cats and Dogs Contact your veterinarian if your pet ever exhibits symptoms of hypoglycemia. Your vet will perform a physical examination, take a full health history, and perform certain diagnostic tests. Most cases of hypoglycemia are easily diagnosed through routine blood work that reveals low glucose levels. The more challenging part of diagnosis is figuring out the source of the condition. Exploratory testing may include: Blood chemistry to assess liver, kidney, and pancreatic health Complete blood count to check for blood conditions Urinalysis to evaluate the kidneys and check for urinary tract infection or other diseases Thyroid test to see if there is a problem with thyroid hormone production X-ray or ultrasound to search for tumors, liver shunts, or liver abnormalities Treatment for Hypoglycemia in Cats and Dogs Treatment for hypoglycemia is usually a two-pronged attack: blood sugar levels must be raised immediately the underlying cause of the condition must be Continue reading >>

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Caring for a pet with diabetes can be daunting. Fortunately, the key to successful diabetes management is simple: a consistent, established daily routine. A healthy diet is essential, and feeding your pet the same amount of food at the same time every day will help make blood sugar easiest to control. Your pet will usually also need twice-daily insulin injections, which should be given at the same time every day. (The easiest way to do this is to coordinate shots with mealtimes.) Routine daily exercise and regular at-home monitoring of urine and/or blood sugar round out a plan for good diabetic regulation. Even if you are following a consistent routine, a diabetic pet may occasionally experience an emergency. A number of different things can cause an emergency, but the most common is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. In this case, it is important that you be prepared in order to avoid a life-threatening situation. Hypoglycemia: Why It Happens Hypoglycemia most often results from accidental overdosage of insulin, but it can also occur if a pet is not eating well, misses a meal or vomits after eating, or if the type and amount of food he is being fed changes. Hypoglycemia may become a problem with very vigorous exercise; for this reason, regular daily controlled exercise is best. Hypoglycemia can also result if the body’s need for insulin changes. This scenario is particularly common in cats who often return to a non-diabetic state once an appropriate diet and insulin therapy start. Vet Tips Avoid “double-dosing” insulin. Only one person in a household should have the responsibility of giving insulin. A daily log should be kept of the time/amount of food and insulin that is given to avoid errors. Proper daily monitoring of blood and/or urine glucose can help identif Continue reading >>

Emergency Treatment For Hypoglycemia & Seizures In Dogs

Emergency Treatment For Hypoglycemia & Seizures In Dogs

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is one of many causes of seizures in dogs. It occurs most commonly in young puppies of small breed dogs but can also occur secondary to other disease processes in older dogs. Emergency first aid for a dog with hypoglycemia requires administering a high-sugar substance orally, but you'll need to do so carefully to avoid hurting yourself or your dog. Blood Sugar Deficiency Hypoglycemia results when blood sugar levels fall below a normal range. Blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, is important for all cellular function because it is converted into energy by the cells of the body. The brain has an especially high demand for glucose, so when blood glucose levels fall severely, seizure activity can occur in the brain. In addition to glucose circulating in the blood, the body packages some glucose into storage molecules called glycogen that are stored in skeletal muscle and the liver. These glycogen stores can be rapidly broken down into glucose molecules during exercise and other periods of high energy demand. Emergency First Aid for Hypoglycemia Initial symptoms of hypoglycemia in dogs and puppies include weakness, depression, staggering, or trembling. Feeding a small amount of a sugar-rich food such as vanilla ice cream, Karo syrup or honey can rapidly improve the animal's condition. If the dog is not coherent enough to eat, rubbing a small amount of one of these substances on the gums will help -- but be careful to avoid being bitten. Never feed chocolate to a dog, as chocolate causes toxicity in dogs. If a dog is having a hypoglycemic seizure, do not put your fingers in the dog's mouth; often, a dog will chomp his jaws involuntarily. Instead, use something else to squirt a small amount of a sugary substance into the mouth, such as ho Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Remember, your health guarantee does NOT cover hypoglycemia so it is imperative you read this information closely and stay on top of things. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar (sometimes called "sugar shock") is a condition where the blood sugar level drops to an extremely low level due to lack of food, or by using up all stored energy without it being replenished. (Such as when your puppy plays for an extended period of time without eating.) The most common trigger is stress (such as going to a new home). Teacups and Tiny Toys can be prone to hypoglycemia because they have such tiny digestive systems. They can only store a small amount of food (energy) in their stomach at one time. Their liver and pancreas which are necessary for digestion and sugar balance are also small and usually underdeveloped as well. Most puppies tend to grow out of hypoglycemia as they get older. As they grow, so do their major organs. This makes them more able to utilize and to process the food that they eat so it can sustain them for longer periods of time. REMEMBER: to prevent hypoglycemia, puppies need to eat several small meals a day. It is much easier to prevent by always having a readily available food supply, than to have to treat it once it happens. It is very scary to see a puppy that you love so dearly in "sugar shock." Symptoms and Treatment Symptoms of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can occur without warning in a healthy puppy and can be a very scary thing! So it is best to know what to look for! Your puppy may exhibit one or more of these signs: The first sign that is usually seen is vomiting on an empty stomach. (clear liquid) If your teacup has not eaten in a while, and vomits without acting sick, give them food, Nutri-Cal or Karo syrup immediately! Some other signs are acting listles Continue reading >>

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

Caring for a diabetic pet can be challenging, but there are certain precautions pet owners can take to prevent a diabetic emergency like hypoglycemia. Preventing a health crisis in a dog or cat with diabetes involves employing a consistent daily routine involving diet, exercise, insulin therapy, and supplementation. It also involves avoiding any and all unnecessary vaccinations. Even the most diligent pet parent can find himself facing a diabetic emergency with a dog or cat. Hypoglycemia is the most common health crisis, and is usually the result of an inadvertent overdose of insulin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can appear suddenly and include lethargy or restlessness, anxiety or other behavioral changes, muscle weakness or twitching, seizures, coma, and death. At-home treatment for a diabetic pet with hypoglycemia is determined by whether or not the animal is alert. Signs of other potential impending diabetic emergencies include ketones in the urine; straining to urinate or bloody urine; vomiting or diarrhea; or a complete loss of appetite or reduced appetite for several days. By Dr. Becker Caring for a diabetic pet can be quite complex and time consuming. It involves regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, making necessary dietary adjustments, giving insulin injections or oral medications, and keeping a careful eye on your pet at all times. Frequent veterinary visits are the norm for dogs and cats with diabetes, as are the costs associated with checkups, tests, medical procedures, and insulin therapy. And unlike humans with the disease, our pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling or help in their own treatment and recovery. Preventing Diabetic Emergencies The key to preventing diabetic emergencies with a pet involves implementing a consistent daily routine and sti Continue reading >>

Can You Give Sugar Water To A Puppy?

Can You Give Sugar Water To A Puppy?

Puppies, especially small or toy breeds, are susceptible to low blood sugar, a condition that can be treated with sugar water. Dangerously low sugar levels in a puppy can result in seizure and death. Sugar water is a life-saving treatment for puppies whose immature systems fail to regulate glucose, a condition called hypoglycemia. Puppies less than 4 months old are most likely to require sugar water as a dietary supplement. Sugar water for puppies can be made with white table sugar, Karo syrup, honey or Nutri-Cal. Mix the sugar product with water and feed to the puppy with an eyedropper or rub on the tongue and gums. Puppies that suffer from hypoglycemia and are in urgent need of sugar water will exhibit weakness, listlessness, trembling and disorientation. Without sugar water, hypoglycemia can advance very quickly to lifelessness, seizures and death. Many breeders recommend that puppies be offered sugar water, or other sweetened water, every day until they are at least 4 months old. It is also important to feed puppies a well-balanced puppy food every four hours. The suggested daily dose of sugar water for puppies is 2 tablespoons of honey (or equivalent sweetener) with 1/2 cup of water. Puppies can also be fed two tablespoons of peanut butter mixed with honey or Karo syrup, in small increments over the course of a day. Small breeds, like Chihuahuas and Yorkshire Terriers, are most susceptible to hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can cause death very quickly in a puppy; call a veterinarian immediately if sugar water does not immediately resuscitate the puppy. Continue reading >>

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