diabetestalk.net

What Can Cause Low Blood Sugar In Non Diabetics?

Share on facebook

Visit http://www.restorebloodsugar.clic27.c... Best Way Lower Blood Sugar | Natural Ways To Lower Blood Sugar Hi my name is Bryanna Wayans! Welcome to my channel and to this video, today I will teach the best way to lower blood sugar Use up the glucose in your bloodstream with physical movement by jogging, riding a stationary bicycle or doing some calisthenics such as jumping jacks. Swing your arms in circular movements. Keep up the activity for at least 10 minutes or more. Drink two 8-ounce glasses of water quickly. Wait five minutes and drink a third glass which will cause you to urinate. Water dilutes the blood and flushes out the sugar from your bloodstream. Eat 2 tablespoons of peanut butter. If you don't want to eat it alone, put it on apple slices. It is better not to peanut butter on bread or crackers because they are carbohydrates and counterproductive to lowering your blood sugar. If you feel that you want it on bread, eat a half peanut butter sandwich. Use one slice of whole wheat bread and one or two tablespoons peanut butter. Anarticlesuggests that drinking one cup of green tea often lowers blood sugar levels as much as 30 points. Regular black tea is also effective,

Non-diabetes Medicines That May Lower Blood Sugar

British Columbia Specific Information Your health care provider may prescribe you non-diabetic medications, or diabetic medications, which may raise or lower your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, it is important to remember and understand which medications may affect your blood sugar levels. Examples of medications that may lower your blood sugar include: quinolone antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, mocifloxacin); pentamidine; quinine; ace inhibitors (ramapril, enalapril); and beta-blockers (atenolol, metropolol). In addition, beta-blockers may also decrease or mask the symptoms of low blood sugar. For more information, call 8-1-1 to speak with a registered nurse or pharmacist. Our nurses are available anytime, every day of the year; and our pharmacists are available every night from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 a.m. Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. EPhantom

    Still trying to figure out if non diabetics get spikes after eating and how high they can get... I would assume anyone can get a spike if they eat too many carbs too quickly for their cells to be able to react to... I have found people supporting both sides, but not much from the scientific community... would love to see continuous monitors on tons of people that have passed a morning and OGTT... but I found someone on another forum saying this about the subject... which really confuses me O_O It makes me think the person had a spike before the one hour mark and shot down before they were measured.
    "Sorry, a bit of thread hi-hacking I am a non-diabetic, bmi18-19, active female. My Fasting tests are around 70-80, so normal. OGTT, even with 75g of glucose only took me to a high of 115mg/dl, no spike or reactive hypo. But food gives me spikes from 175mg/dl for just 1 green banana, 210 mg/dl for 2 small slices of toast and butter, and up in the 230 mg/dl if I dare to have a pudding, even without the main course first ! First, is this normal? Second, why do these foods cause these spikes when 75g of pure glucose causes no rise at all, after all banana is only around 20-30g of carb, 2 slices of toast about the same."
    I'm going to keep searching for something, anything showing what actually happens point for point after a "normal" person eats... whatever "normal" is... :/
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/...-with-a-reading-of-234-half-hour-after-eating
    bottom of the page

  2. EPhantom

    http://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2005/selvin-bloodsugar.html
    Johns Hopkins hospital talking about the effects of high blood sugar in diabetics and non-diabetics... Why would they say that if "normal" people can't get spikes or go above the "120" normal...
    "The researchers found that Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)—a measure of long-term blood glucose level—predicts heart disease risk in both diabetics and non-diabetics. An elevated blood glucose level is the defining feature of diabetes, but until now it was unclear whether elevated glucose levels contributed independently to increasing heart-disease risk."

  3. jack412

    this should be close enough
    http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14045524.php
    Here are what doctors currently believe to be non-diabetic readings:
    Fasting blood sugarunder 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L)
    One hour after meals under 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L)
    Two hours after meals under 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L)
    If you can do better than this, go for it. At a minimum, The American College of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends that people with diabetes keep their blood sugars under 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L) two hours after eating.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

In this Video We Will Discuss What are hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, and how can they affect my pregnancy? Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are both common in women with preexisting diabetes. Hypoglycemia occurs when blood glucose levels are too low. When blood glucose levels are low, your body cannot get the energy it needs. Don't forget to Subscribe our Channel on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZfb... For For Videos Follow Us on Twitter: Diabetes During Pregnancy Symptoms, Risks And Treatment https://youtu.be/SNf01dFL1zY What Are The Risks Of Diabetes To My Unborn Child? https://youtu.be/N-aNwqGKQl4 What are Hypoglycemia and How They Affect Pregnancy? https://youtu.be/XUjn-16DmGY How Pre-existing Diabetes Treated During Pregnancy? https://youtu.be/vQjOzry8T_M Causes and Symptoms of Diabetes During Pregnancy https://youtu.be/OirB5FmhJ3Y Typically hypoglycemia is treated by eating or drinking something containing sugar, such as orange juice. Hyperglycemia is when your body doesn't have enough insulin or can't use insulin correctly. Typically hyperglycemia is treated by adjusting your insulin dosages.

Hypoglycemia In Non-diabetic In-patients: Clinical Or Criminal?

Go to: Abstract We wished to establish the frequency of unexpected hypoglycemia observed in non diabetic patients outside the intensive care unit and to determine if they have a plausible clinical explanation. Methods We analysed data for 2010 from three distinct sources to identify non diabetic hypoglycaemic patients: bedside and laboratory blood glucose measurements; medication records for those treatments (high-strength glucose solution and glucagon) commonly given to reverse hypoglycemia; and diagnostic codes for hypoglycemia. We excluded from the denominator admissions of patients with a diagnosis of diabetes or prescribed diabetic medication. Case notes of patients identified were reviewed. We used capture-recapture methods to establish the likely frequency of hypoglycemia in non-diabetic in-patients outside intensive care unit at different cut-off points for hypoglycemia. We also recorded co-morbidities that might have given rise to hypoglycemia. Among the 37,898 admissions, the triggers identified 71 hypoglycaemic episodes at a cut-off of 3.3 mmol/l. Estimated frequency at 3.3 mmol/l was 50(CI 33–93), at 3.0 mmol/l, 36(CI 24–64), at 2.7 mmol/l, 13(CI 11–19), at 2.5 mm Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. MarieA

    Can non-diabetics have days of high numbers?

    HI Everyone-
    I have not been diagnosed with anything, but have been on and off monitoring my numbers over the past 9 months. On a regular test I had a fasting of 91. My dr wasn't concerned but I had read that normal was 83. I have health anxiety so I went out and bought a glucose meter. I started testing and everything seemed normal (except my fasting was typically around 90-91. My 1 hour and 2 hours were pretty good. For some reason I picked up the meter again and started testing and was getting some very large spikes at 1 hour. Not every time, but sometimes. It was usually after lunch (which is my first meal normally) and I was very very anxious testing at one hour for some reason. Once or twice I saw the number get as high as 175. By two hours I was always back around 100. I went to my dr in a panic and she felt that my anxiety was causing my 1 hr numbers to be high. I will admit that a few times I have not been meaning to test and I realize I ate 1 hour ago and I decide right then and there to test. My numbers at those times were much better....i hadn't had the build up of anxiety. ANyway I asked for a 1 hr oral glucose test and an hbaic. I passed the 1 hr test, but my number was 134. To me that is high but I do admit as much as I tried to stay calm I was anxious. My AIC was 5.1.
    I check from time to time and I have had some very disturbing numbers the past week. I keep reading that illness and lack of sleep can affect numbers. Is this true in non-diabetics also, or just diabetics? I took my fasting the other day. It was about 10am and I hadn't eaten since the night before. I had just finished vacuuming the house so my heart rate was up. It was 101/102 (took it twice) I was worried and I took it 10 minutes later and it was 107. 5 minutes later it was 110. It actually came down after I ate something.
    The next morning my numbers were 98/99
    Next day 97
    Today I got up and it was 107/105. Eeks! I went back to bed and freaked out to my husband for 10 minutes, went and took it again and it was 94/94??? I don't understand?
    However, i don't think I am sick, but I am in the middle of a horrible allergy problem. Since the first day of high numbers I have had a horrible sore throat, headache, and feel like my head is going to explode. I feel like I have a bad cold, but I know it is allergies as it happens every time the wind picks up here (which it did last week) I have also been dealing with a teething baby this past week and was up in the middle of the night for about 40 minutes with her. She woke up at 7am this morning, but with the time change a few days ago, my body still felt like it was 6am...and the allergies and lack of sleep didn't help.
    I have tested my post meal numbers the past couple days at lunch. Each meal had about 50g of carbs, but also had a good amt of protein. My 1 hrs were 101/114 and my two hours were both under 100. So those seem fine.
    I guess my question is- can not feeling well and lack of sleep affect someone with normal glucose tolerance to the point where I would be getting readings in the prediabetic levels a couple mornings? Or do these things only raise blood sugar in people who have glucose issues? And why would my glucose drop from 107 to 94 this morning in 10 minutes. Should I stop testing until I feel better?
    Sorry for the super long post but I would love some insight. As I said, I have pretty bad health anxiety so I get very nervous about these things. BTW- all other numbers on my blood test are good. High HDL, low LDL, triglycerides 43, BMI 18.5. I'm vegetarian so I probably eat a lot of carbs, but I eat very healthy food most of the time. Thanks in advance!

  2. furball64801

    You may drive yourself nuts worrying over a number. My suggestion is eat 3 meals a day, lower the carb intake and get out and walk. And the term healthy food means a total different thing to anyone dealing with blood sugar numbers. Carbs turn to sugar so you may have to eat more veggies and less of a few other things. None of those numbers can damage you but it might play with your anxiety that you have.

  3. gap2368

    what fur said is very good advice try not to worry to much it is not good for you to worry so much

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Low Blood Sugar ka ilaj in Urdu- Low Blood Sugar ka Desi ilaj- Low Blood Sugar Treatment in Urdu Hindi Urdu Plus channel is about all general health related issues in Urdu. Urdu Totkay. Health News in Urdu. health tips. beauty tips & ghareloo totkay. Islamic Knowledge in Urdu.Cooking Recipes in Urdu. We also provide the information about vegetable benefits in urdu, Daily News. Dilchasp News. Urdu Plus provide general information about your health for more information and treatments please contact your doctor. plz hamary GOOGLE PLUS page ko bi zaroor follow karain : https://plus.google.com/+UrduPlus plz hamary facebook profile ko bhi follow karain : https://www.facebook.com/saqibyousaf2014 plz hamary facebook page ko bi like karain : https://www.facebook.com/UrduPluss plz hamary facebook group ko bi join karain : https://www.facebook.com/groups/UrduP... plz hamary Twitter page ko bhi follow karain : https://twitter.com/saqibyousaf2626 plz watch my all youtube videos: https://www.facebook.com/UrduPluss/ap... plz hamary incomeon profile ko bhi follow karain : https://www.incomeon.com/saqibyousaf3... On This URDU PLUS Channel You Will Find Everything Related To Celebrities. Everyday Vi

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. All of the following can cause blood sugar (glucose) level to drop: Drinking alcohol Getting too much activity Intentionally or unintentionally overdosing on the medicines used to treat diabetes Missing meals Even when diabetes is managed very carefully, the medicines used to treat diabetes can result in drug-induced low blood sugar. The condition may also occur when someone without diabetes takes a medicine used to treat diabetes. In rare cases, non-diabetes-related medicines can cause low blood sugar. Medicines that can cause drug-induced low blood sugar include: Bactrim (an antibiotic) Beta-blockers Haloperidol Insulin MAO inhibitors Metformin when used with sulfonylureas Pentamidine Quinidine Quinine SGLT2 inhibitors (such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) Sulfonylureas Thiazolidinediones (such as Actos and Avandia) Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. EPhantom

    Still trying to figure out if non diabetics get spikes after eating and how high they can get... I would assume anyone can get a spike if they eat too many carbs too quickly for their cells to be able to react to... I have found people supporting both sides, but not much from the scientific community... would love to see continuous monitors on tons of people that have passed a morning and OGTT... but I found someone on another forum saying this about the subject... which really confuses me O_O It makes me think the person had a spike before the one hour mark and shot down before they were measured.
    "Sorry, a bit of thread hi-hacking I am a non-diabetic, bmi18-19, active female. My Fasting tests are around 70-80, so normal. OGTT, even with 75g of glucose only took me to a high of 115mg/dl, no spike or reactive hypo. But food gives me spikes from 175mg/dl for just 1 green banana, 210 mg/dl for 2 small slices of toast and butter, and up in the 230 mg/dl if I dare to have a pudding, even without the main course first ! First, is this normal? Second, why do these foods cause these spikes when 75g of pure glucose causes no rise at all, after all banana is only around 20-30g of carb, 2 slices of toast about the same."
    I'm going to keep searching for something, anything showing what actually happens point for point after a "normal" person eats... whatever "normal" is... :/
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/...-with-a-reading-of-234-half-hour-after-eating
    bottom of the page

  2. EPhantom

    http://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2005/selvin-bloodsugar.html
    Johns Hopkins hospital talking about the effects of high blood sugar in diabetics and non-diabetics... Why would they say that if "normal" people can't get spikes or go above the "120" normal...
    "The researchers found that Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)—a measure of long-term blood glucose level—predicts heart disease risk in both diabetics and non-diabetics. An elevated blood glucose level is the defining feature of diabetes, but until now it was unclear whether elevated glucose levels contributed independently to increasing heart-disease risk."

  3. jack412

    this should be close enough
    http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14045524.php
    Here are what doctors currently believe to be non-diabetic readings:
    Fasting blood sugarunder 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L)
    One hour after meals under 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L)
    Two hours after meals under 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L)
    If you can do better than this, go for it. At a minimum, The American College of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends that people with diabetes keep their blood sugars under 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L) two hours after eating.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Can Non Diabetics Have Low Blood Sugar

    What Is It? Hypoglycemia is an abnormally low level of blood sugar (blood glucose). Because the brain depends on blood sugar as its primary source of energy, hypoglycemia interferes with the brain's ability to function properly. This can cause dizziness, headache, blurred vision, difficulty concentrating and other neurological symptoms. Hypoglycemia also triggers the release of body hormones, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine. Your brain rel ...

    blood sugar Apr 5, 2018
  • What Can Cause Low Blood Sugar In Non Diabetics?

    If your kitty has hypoglycemia, it means her blood sugar has dropped so low she is having neurological symptoms because her brain isn't getting enough fuel. Hypoglycemia is a symptom, not a disease, and is almost always related to diabetes. But even if your cat isn't diabetic, hypoglycemia in a kitty is always a medical emergency. Copious Vomiting Your non-diabetic cat can have an episode of hypoglycemia if she has an insulin spike. The most comm ...

    blood sugar Apr 16, 2018
  • What Is The Cause Of Low Blood Sugar In Non Diabetics?

    You've heard it before—how taking a snack at nighttime after dinner may not be such a good idea, what with the weight gain that may come with it. But if you're a diabetic, that nighttime snack may spell the difference between life and death—literally. “The absence of a nighttime snack when one is usually taken is one cause of nocturnal hypoglycemia,” said Dr. Richard Elwyn Fernando, president of Diabetes Philippines and consultant at St. ...

    diabetes Jan 5, 2018
  • Can Stress Cause High Blood Sugar In Non Diabetics

    When the body is under stress, the adrenal glands trigger the release of glucose stored in various organs, which often leads to elevated levels of glucose in the bloodstream. For people with diabetes, this can be particularly problematic as they find it harder than non-diabetics to regain normal blood glucose levels after a bout of stress. The common misconception with stress is that it is an emotional problem, often disguised as anxiety, worry, ...

    blood sugar Apr 23, 2018
  • Can Low Blood Sugar Cause Low Blood Pressure

    A A A Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a commonly perceived problem. In actuality, while some or many of the symptoms may be present, it is rarely confirmed or documented. The presence of true, documented hypoglycemia in the absence of diabetes treatment must be evaluated comprehensively by an endocrinologist. Hypoglycemia most often affects those at the extremes of age, such as infants and the elderly, but may hap ...

    blood sugar Apr 28, 2018
  • Can Infection Cause High Blood Sugar In Non Diabetics

    Hyperglycemia means high blood sugar. It is the primary symptom of diabetes. Unlike its opposite, hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia is not immediately life-threatening. This doesn't mean it's not dangerous, though. For "how high is high", see blood glucose levels, and also the long-term symptoms discussion at the end of this page. Increasing physical activity can mean lowering blood sugar levels for some pets and people with this disease. It can also r ...

    blood sugar Apr 23, 2018

Popular Articles

More in blood sugar