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What Are The Warning Signs Of Childhood Diabetes?

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

vgajic via Getty Images As a parent, I sometimes nag — and I’ll bet that you do, too. For instance, how often do you say things like this? “I don’t want to hear your excuses. You’re not too tired — go take out the trash.” “You just went to the bathroom. You can hold it until the end of the movie.” “You don’t need a snack or another drink of water. Go back to bed.” “Don’t talk to me in that tone of voice. Go to your room.” I know I’ve said all these things at one time or another. But here’s the thing: If you’re saying them all the time, there’s a chance that your child isn’t simply being demanding, irritable, or lazy. Instead, your child may be displaying symptoms of diabetes. These days, we’re all aware that there’s an epidemic of diabetes in adults. But diabetes rates aren’t just soaring in grownups; they’re rising in kids, too. A recent study found that the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in kids up to 9 years of age jumped by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009. During the same time, the incidence of Type 2 diabetes among children between 10 and 19 rose by 30.5 percent. Currently, more than 200,000 American kids have diabetes — and if the trends continue, that number will keep rising. So if you’re a parent, diabetes definitely needs to be on your radar. Here’s a look at what this disease is and how to spot it. Understanding Diabetes There are two types of diabetes that kids or adults can develop. Here’s a quick look at each one. Type 1 diabetes — what we used to call “juvenile” diabetes — typically strikes kids, teens, and young adults. It causes insulin-producing cells in the pancreas to die, preventing the body from getting blood sugar into cells. Genes play a big role in Type 1diabetes, but rising rates als Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs In Young Children

Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs In Young Children

© 2017 by Joslin Diabetes Center. All rights reserved. All materials contained on this site are protected by United States copyright law and may be used for personal, noncommercial use only. For permission for other use call 617-226-5815. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content. One Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02215 617-309-2400 Continue reading >>

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

Go to: Infants and toddlers comprise a small minority of individuals with type 1 diabetes. However, epidemiological data provide evidence of a trend towards diagnosis at a younger age. These very young children pose significant challenges to both the health care professionals involved in their care as well as to their families. At diagnosis, younger children often do not present with classical symptoms of diabetes. Unless health professionals remain alert to the possibility of diabetes being the underlying cause of a child’s illness, the diagnosis may be missed. Once the diabetes has been diagnosed, the major challenge is to set up a treatment regimen that is both reasonable and realistic; in the youngest children, the goal of very tight metabolic control may expose them to episodes of severe hypoglycemia which may lead to subtle cognitive impairments later in life. The therapeutic regimen must balance the naturally erratic eating and exercise patterns of very young children with the need to maintain adequate metabolic control. Setting a blood glucose target range of 6 to 12 mmol/L usually allows this to be accomplished. Diabetes during early childhood creates a psychosocial challenge to the families of these children. Successful management of infants and toddlers with diabetes depends on a well functioning and educated family, the availability of diabetes health care team experienced in the treatment of these youngsters, and the involvement of the extended family, child care personnel and others who play a role in their daily care. Keywords: Infants, Metabolic control, Toddlers, Type I diabetes Children under three to five years of age with type I diabetes comprise a small proportion of all those with this disorder: less than 1% of all children are diagnosed in the f Continue reading >>

Doc Talk: Warning Signs Of Childhood Diabetes

Doc Talk: Warning Signs Of Childhood Diabetes

Welcome back to another installment of Doc Talk, a virtual trip to the doctor’s office. No waiting rooms required! Today’s video will bring you into the exam room with Dr. James Scherer, a pediatrician at Mercy Pediatric Clinic in Bentonville. (He has treated all three of my kids, and he is awesome!) Dr. Scherer will explain the red flags parents should watch out for in order to catch the warning signs of childhood diabetes. As you know, diabetes has become a major health problem in our country, so we all need to be on the lookout for possible signs of the disease. Click on the “play” arrow in the video window below to hear Dr. Scherer talk about this topic. For more info about the doctor’s training and background, click on the photo on the right and a separate video window will open. If you have any questions about this topic, contact the Mercy Pediatric Clinic at 479-986-6120 or click here to visit the Mercy website. Our thanks to Dr. Scherer for sharing this important info with local moms! Continue reading >>

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

8 signs your child may have type 1 diabetes Concerned your child may have type 1 diabetes? Watch out for these signs Over 300,000 Canadians have type 1 diabetes , yet when your own child is diagnosed with this disease, it can come as a shock. Most kids who get diabetes do not have another family member with it, points out diabetes specialist Dr. Maureen Clement in Vernon, B.C. Often, its just a bolt of lightning. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed during childhood, often between the ages of 10 to 13. Theres nothing parents can do to prevent this type of diabetes. However, if you notice signs your child might have the disease, you can take action to prevent a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), in which the body runs out of insulin to process sugar and begins to break down fat instead. If your child shows indications of type 1 diabetes, says Clement, then dont delay in visiting your pediatrician. Dont say, lets wait a week or two. Get your kid tested that day to make sure they dont have diabetes. And if it does turn out that your child is diabetic, remember that as long as the disease is well managed, she can still enjoy good health her whole life. Heres what to watch out for. Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may be constantly thirsty. Thats because as their blood-glucose level rises, fluid is pulled from their body tissues. These kids may especially crave sweet, cold drinks. What goes in must come out, so it stands to reason that a child who is drinking more will also visit the washroom more. If your kid is taking an unusual number of bathroom breaks, there may be an underlying and serious reason behind it. A younger child who was previously toilet trained at night may start to wet the bed again. A body that cant use the energy from suga Continue reading >>

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Children?

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Children?

Years ago, it was rare to hear about a child with type 2 diabetes. Doctors used to think kids only got type 1. It was even called juvenile diabetes for a long time. Not anymore. Now, according to the CDC, more than 208,000 people younger than 20 have this disease. That number includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Here's what you need to know if your child is diagnosed. You've probably heard diabetes and high blood sugar mentioned together. Here's what happens. Your digestive system breaks down carbohydrates into a type of sugar called glucose. Your pancreas creates a hormone, known as insulin, that moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it’s used for fuel. In type 2 diabetes, the cells in your child's body don’t respond to the insulin, and glucose builds up in her bloodstream. This is called insulin resistance. Eventually, the sugar levels in her body get too high for it to handle. That could lead to other conditions in the future, like heart disease, blindness, and kidney failure. Type 2 diabetes is most likely to affect kids who are: Girls Overweight Have a family history of diabetes American Indian, African-American, Asian, or Hispanic/Latino Have a problem called insulin resistance The single biggest cause of type 2 diabetes in children is extra weight. In the U.S., nearly 1 out of every 3 children is overweight. Once a child gets too heavy, she’s twice as likely to get diabetes. One or more of these things may contribute to extra weight or obesity: Unhealthy eating Family members (alive or dead) who've been overweight Rarely, a hormone problem or other medical condition As with adults, type 2 diabetes is more likely to affect children who carry extra weight around the middle. At first, there may be no symptoms. Over time, you may notice: Hun Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms – Type 1 Diabetes

Signs And Symptoms – Type 1 Diabetes

Up to 5 Irish children and teenagers are diagnosed each week with Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition affecting 1 in 500 children with onset over days or weeks. The condition tends to occur in childhood or early adult life and will require daily insulin therapy. It is caused by the body’s own immune system destroying the insulin-making cells (beta-cells) of the pancreas. Diagnosis A simple finger prick test by a GP can lead to early diagnosis and avoid the risk of developing DKA. Early diagnosis is vital to ensure that Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) does not develop. DKA is a potentially life threatening condition that requires urgent medical attention. In 2014, 1 in 6 children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes were admitted to hospital with DKA, as a result of late diagnosis. Signs and Symptoms Knowing the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes is vital. Up to five children and teenagers are diagnosed each week with Type 1 diabetes in Ireland with 10% having a late diagnosis resulting in critical illness. The four main symptoms of Type 1 diabetes are easy to remember: Thirst: Excess drinking, unable to quench thirst. Toilet: Frequent urination, particularly at night. Tiredness: Lack of energy, sleeping more than usual. Weight loss: Rapid weight loss over a short period. If these symptoms present themselves, immediate attention is needed. A simple blood glucose (finger prick) test by your GP can check for Type 1 diabetes. Less common symptoms: Lack of concentration Vomiting and abdominal pain Constipation Bedwetting Mood swings Frequent infections Itchy skin infections In children under the age of two, symptoms may not be immediately obvious. If your child is unwell without a definite cause, ask your GP to check for Type 1 diabetes. For more information on Type Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

What is diabetes? What are the types of diabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when your blood sugar (glucose), is too high (hyperglycemia). Glucose is what the body uses for energy, and the pancreas produces a hormone called insulin that helps convert the glucose from the food you eat into energy. When the body either does not produce enough insulin, does not produce any at all, or your body becomes resistant to the insulin, the glucose does not reach your cells to be used for energy. This results in the health condition termed diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, because it usually is diagnosed during childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body does not produce insulin because the body’s immune system attacks insulin-producing cells from the pancreas called beta cells. Type 1 diabetes is treated by using insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This occurs when blood sugar levels get too high over time, and the cells become insensitive or resistant to insulin (termed insulin resistance). There are multiple medications used to treat type 2 diabetes. What is prediabetes (pre-diabetes)? Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but a person does not yet have diabetes. Prediabetes and high blood glucose levels are a risk factor for developing diabetes, heart disease, and other health problems. Other warning signs prediabetes may include increased urination, feeling you need to urinate more often, and/or increased thirst. What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are the same in men and women? There are diabetes warning signs and symptom Continue reading >>

Diabetes Overview

Diabetes Overview

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are lifelong conditions. You can minimise the long-term risks and complications for your child. diabetes is a condition where the level of glucose (also known as sugar) in the blood is too high that's because the body is not using the glucose properly in type 1 diabetes, the main problem is that the insulin making cells in the pancreas are destroyed and not able to make enough insulin in type 2 diabetes, the main problem is that the body is not able to use the insulin effectively due to resistance to insulin both forms of diabetes are lifelong conditions - once diagnosed as having type 1 or type 2 diabetes, your child will always have it you can minimise the long term risks and complications for your child What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the level of glucose (also known as sugar) in the blood is too high. That's because the body is not using the glucose properly. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to allow glucose from food to move from the blood into cells in the body where it can be used for fuel for energy. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. Diabetes occurs when the insulin making cells in the pancreas are unable to make enough insulin or when there is resistance to the effects of insulin. You might find it helpful to watch a Diabetes UK animation (8 minutes 44 seconds) about diabetes and the body. © Diabetes UK. This video has been reproduced from the Diabetes UK website with the kind permission of Diabetes UK, the charity for people in the UK with diabetes. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the main problem is that the insulin making cells in the pancreas are destroyed and not able to make enough insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the main problem is that the body is not able to u Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children: Factsheet

Diabetes In Children: Factsheet

What is it? Diabetes is a condition characterised by the increased levels of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. The hormone Insulin usually moves the glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. However, if the body cannot make adequate amounts of Insulin or it does not perform its function properly, the glucose is not moved, hence resulting in higher levels of this type of sugar in the blood. The impact of high glucose levels in the blood can affect both short term and long term health. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes: This type is an autoimmune condition as the body works against the production of Insulin by destroying pancreatic cells that create it. This leaves little or no Insulin for the body to ensure proper transport of glucose to the different cells. 2. Type 2 diabetes: This type of diabetes is a result of insufficient levels of Insulin in the body or due to the impaired functioning of the hormone. Is it common? Type 1 diabetes is more common in children and young adults. One in ten Australians with diabetes have this type, pushing Australia’s rates to one of the highest in the world. Type 2 diabetes was less commonly observed in children, however recently, Diabetes Australia reports that this type is also being observed in the younger generation, with the rise of obesity and other lifestyle habits. What are the causes? The exact cause of Type 1 diabetes is still being researched, however, the presence of certain genes can predispose the child to develop the condition. Other causes include viral infections which could act like a trigger, making the immune system attack the Insulin producing pancreatic cells. Type 2 diabetes in children is largely thought to occur due to lifestyle habits. Being overweight or obese can mea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Warning Symptoms & Signs Of Diabetes

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Warning Symptoms & Signs Of Diabetes

Are you concerned that you or your loved one may have diabetes?Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the pancreas stops producing insulina hormone that allows the body to get energy from food. Its onset has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. With type 2 diabetes your body doesnt use insulin properlywhich is known as insulin resistance. As a result, your pancreas makes extra insulin to compensate, but over time it is unable to keep up. T1D is identified in children and adults as they show signs of the following symptoms: Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. Thats why its important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If youre experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isnt able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Pay attention if you find yourself feeli Continue reading >>

Summer Hides Signs Of Childhood Diabetes

Summer Hides Signs Of Childhood Diabetes

LATE DIAGNOSIS Perth experts are warning parents to be aware of the symptoms of diabetes, after reports of children being diagnosed late. Doctors are worried that symptoms such as excessive thirst and tiredness can be dismissed as harmless during WA’s hot summer months, particularly if children are very active. WA’s peak diabetes funding group Diabetes Research WA said diabetes could be hard to detect in warmer weather and it was important families knew the early warning signs. Executive director Sherl Westlund said rates of type 1 and type 2 diabetes were rising in Australian children, including a doubling in type 1 over the past two decades. “Symptoms such as being excessively thirsty and hungry, losing weight, passing urine more and feeling unusually tired can be easier to dismiss in WA’s hot summers when kids are more active, so we’re urging mums and dads to know the signs,” she said. Professor Liz Davis, clinical lead of Princess Margaret Hospital’s department of endocrinology and diabetes, said spreading awareness of the warning signs was vital. “More paediatric cases of type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in winter in WA but educating parents about early warning signs is critical,” she said. “We’re finding that more of the children being diagnosed are presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis, which is a serious condition that results from a delay in diagnosis and can lead to diabetic coma.” When Sophie Anti was constantly thirsty and losing weight in the summer of 2013, the eight-year-old’s parents put the classic symptoms down to the hot weather. Her mother Carolyn said she felt guilty when Sophie was finally diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. “We have a pool and she was constantly in and out of it, and didn’t have much energy, but the doctors Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (It Could Save a Life) By: Rachelle Stocum / Blog Parents of children with diabetes will hear this question asked a million times. And each time you tell your story the story gets shorter and shorter. You begin to leave out details. Details that may one day save another child’s life. I wrote this for a couple of reasons. The first reason was to document the details and help other families who are searching for answers to unexplained symptoms. The second reason was to really get my emotions off my chest, and reflect. December 30, 2016 is a day I will never forget. This date will now be forever know to us as Carter’s “dia-versary.” This was the day my seven year old son Carter was diagnosed with Type one Diabetes. I still tear up when I say or even write those words… my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. The week before Christmas my son Carter had so many complaints. He’s not a whiny kid by any means so this was unusual for him. He’s actually the most compliant child I know. When I ask him to do something he does it. So when he first complained of a stomach ache I thought he was coming down with the flu. It seems reasonable that a child would get sick in December. So I tried to wake him up but it was really hard. He was groggy and didn’t want to wake up. Once he was finally woke up I told him that I didn’t want him to eat anything until I was able to get grandma’s monitor and test his blood sugar. He drank some water but understood what I was asking of him. He didn’t complain or cry even though he was hungry. I knew that was bad because when I was pregnant with him I had gestational diabetes. My blood glucose only ran about 120 from what I can recall, and I knew normal was around Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children (cont.)

Type 2 Diabetes In Children (cont.)

A A A Symptoms Children often have no symptoms of type 2 diabetes before they are diagnosed, because their blood sugar level has been rising so slowly. As a result, a child may have diabetes for several months or years before being diagnosed. When children do have symptoms, the most common include: Slight increase in the frequency of urination. Your child may have started wetting the bed at night. Slight increase in thirst. Other possible symptoms include: Increased tiredness. Nausea. Blurred vision. Frequent infections and slow-healing wounds or sores. Weight loss. What Happens Type 2 diabetes usually develops in adulthood, but the number of children being diagnosed with the disease is rising. Children with type 2 diabetes are usually diagnosed during the early teen years. During this time, their bodies are growing and developing rapidly, placing a demand on the pancreas to produce additional insulin. The hormones released during puberty can make it harder than usual for the body to use insulin correctly (insulin resistance). Also, children with type 2 diabetes are usually overweight, which also contributes to insulin resistance. If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to overcome the resistance, diabetes can develop. Diabetes experts believe the disease progresses as it does in adults. The main risk factors for complications from diabetes are the length of time a person has diabetes and the degree of blood sugar control. A child who develops type 2 diabetes may have an increased risk of complications, because he or she will have the disease for a long time. Some complications that children and teens may develop include: Eye disease (diabetic retinopathy) and kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy). High blood pressure or high cholesterol, which increases the risk Continue reading >>

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