diabetestalk.net

What Are The Warning Signs Of Childhood Diabetes?

Warning Signs Of Diabetes In Toddlers

Warning Signs Of Diabetes In Toddlers

Diabetes is a serious disease that can lead to other serious conditions such as heart disease and kidney failure. According to the Colorado Department of Public Health, about 13,000 new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in children every year. Parents and physician should be aware of the symptoms of diabetes in children so that they can be diagnosed early and begin receiving necessary treatment. Video of the Day Type 1 diabetes results because the body makes very little or no insulin. About 5 percent to 10 percent of diabetes cases are due to type 1 diabetes, counting children and adults. Most cases of diabetes are type 2. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't can't make enough insulin or doesn't use it properly. The number of children with type 2 diabetes has been increasing every year, but young children do not always have the classical symptoms of diabetes. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes include extreme thirst, frequent urination, sudden changes in vision, increased appetite, weight loss, lethargy, heavy breathing and fruity, sweet or fermented breath. The first sign a parent might recognize is stupor or unconsciousness. Testing will reveal sugar in the urine. Type 2 diabetes has the same symptoms, along with slow healing of wounds or sores, itching, high blood pressure and dark velvety patches of skin around the neck or armpits. Often, young children with diabetes don't have the classical symptoms. Less than 1 percent of all children with diabetes are diagnosed before their first birthdays, and less than 2 percent are diagnosed before 3 years of age, according to a January/February 1999 article in the journal "Pediatrics and Child Health," so doctors may not be looking for diabetes when treating children with other symptoms. Little children may be treated for respirat Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children | Early Symptoms & Signs

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children | Early Symptoms & Signs

Reviewed by: Steven Chessler, M.D., Ph.D. 5/18. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the most common metabolic endocrine disease in children. It is a clinical condition whereby a childs pancreas stops producing an important hormone called insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. It facilitates the entry of glucose into the cells and also plays a role in regulating blood glucose levels. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease. It was previously known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile diabetes. T1DM is increasing year by year all over the world. There has been a significant increase in the number of new cases in the past few years. After its onset, T1DM progresses through a pre-symptomatic state (normal sugar) to a symptomatic state. Decreasing beta cells also lowers the production of insulin over a period of time. An important fact to consider is that symptoms of T1DM may appear suddenly and may only be noticed once a child becomes very sick. In worst case scenarios, a child affected by T1DM may go into a coma, which is often caused by diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a common and acute life-threatening complication of T1DM. In Western countries, it is estimated that 25-40% of T1DM cases are diagnosed following a life-threatening bout of DKA. A missed diagnosis of DKA may prove fatal. That is why it is absolutely critical to be aware of the early signs of T1DM. Many of the signs and symptoms of T1DM may be subtle and develop slowly over time. Others may come on suddenly and can be frightening to the children and parents who are affected. Look out for these 10 signs and symptoms of T1DM in children: Polyphagia (increased appetite or excessive hunger)Whatever we eat is converted into glucose, but insulin is needed Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Overview Type 1 diabetes in children is a condition in which your child's body no longer produces an important hormone (insulin). Your child needs insulin to survive, so you'll have to replace the missing insulin. Type 1 diabetes in children used to be known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children can be overwhelming at first. Suddenly you and your child — depending on his or her age — must learn how to give injections, count carbohydrates and monitor blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes in children requires consistent care. But advances in blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery have improved the daily management of the condition. Symptoms The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. These signs and symptoms include: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your child's bloodstream pulls fluid from tissues. As a result your child might be thirsty — and drink and urinate more than usual. A young, toilet-trained child might suddenly experience bed-wetting. Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs lack energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign of type 1 diabetes to be noticed in children. Fatigue. Lack of sugar in your child's cells might make him or her tired and lethargic. Irritability or behavior changes. In addition to mood problems, your child might suddenly have a decline in performance at school. Fruity-smelling breath. Bu Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients we need, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly. Insulin works like a key that opens the doors to cells and lets the glucose in. Without insulin, glucose can't get into the cells (the doors are "locked" and there is no key) and so it stays in the bloodstream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood remains higher than normal. High blood sugar levels are a problem because they can cause a number of health problems. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Both make blood sugar levels higher than normal but they do so in different ways. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses its ability to make insulin because the body's  immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. No one knows exactly why this happens, but scientists think it has something to do with genes. But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. A person probably would then have to be exposed to something else — like a virus — to get type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance ). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough ins Continue reading >>

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

Go to: Infants and toddlers comprise a small minority of individuals with type 1 diabetes. However, epidemiological data provide evidence of a trend towards diagnosis at a younger age. These very young children pose significant challenges to both the health care professionals involved in their care as well as to their families. At diagnosis, younger children often do not present with classical symptoms of diabetes. Unless health professionals remain alert to the possibility of diabetes being the underlying cause of a child’s illness, the diagnosis may be missed. Once the diabetes has been diagnosed, the major challenge is to set up a treatment regimen that is both reasonable and realistic; in the youngest children, the goal of very tight metabolic control may expose them to episodes of severe hypoglycemia which may lead to subtle cognitive impairments later in life. The therapeutic regimen must balance the naturally erratic eating and exercise patterns of very young children with the need to maintain adequate metabolic control. Setting a blood glucose target range of 6 to 12 mmol/L usually allows this to be accomplished. Diabetes during early childhood creates a psychosocial challenge to the families of these children. Successful management of infants and toddlers with diabetes depends on a well functioning and educated family, the availability of diabetes health care team experienced in the treatment of these youngsters, and the involvement of the extended family, child care personnel and others who play a role in their daily care. Keywords: Infants, Metabolic control, Toddlers, Type I diabetes Children under three to five years of age with type I diabetes comprise a small proportion of all those with this disorder: less than 1% of all children are diagnosed in the f Continue reading >>

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

vgajic via Getty Images As a parent, I sometimes nag — and I’ll bet that you do, too. For instance, how often do you say things like this? “I don’t want to hear your excuses. You’re not too tired — go take out the trash.” “You just went to the bathroom. You can hold it until the end of the movie.” “You don’t need a snack or another drink of water. Go back to bed.” “Don’t talk to me in that tone of voice. Go to your room.” I know I’ve said all these things at one time or another. But here’s the thing: If you’re saying them all the time, there’s a chance that your child isn’t simply being demanding, irritable, or lazy. Instead, your child may be displaying symptoms of diabetes. These days, we’re all aware that there’s an epidemic of diabetes in adults. But diabetes rates aren’t just soaring in grownups; they’re rising in kids, too. A recent study found that the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in kids up to 9 years of age jumped by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009. During the same time, the incidence of Type 2 diabetes among children between 10 and 19 rose by 30.5 percent. Currently, more than 200,000 American kids have diabetes — and if the trends continue, that number will keep rising. So if you’re a parent, diabetes definitely needs to be on your radar. Here’s a look at what this disease is and how to spot it. Understanding Diabetes There are two types of diabetes that kids or adults can develop. Here’s a quick look at each one. Type 1 diabetes — what we used to call “juvenile” diabetes — typically strikes kids, teens, and young adults. It causes insulin-producing cells in the pancreas to die, preventing the body from getting blood sugar into cells. Genes play a big role in Type 1diabetes, but rising rates als Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

Warning Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

Early diagnosis saves lives Recognizing the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes is critical. Although Type 1 develops gradually, as the body’s insulin production decreases, blood glucose levels can become dangerously high once insulin production is outpaced. Symptoms may develop rapidly and can be mistaken for other illnesses such as the flu, even by doctors. A misdiagnosis can have tragic consequences. Many people are familiar with Type 2 diabetes, but there is an under awareness for Type 1. Learn other forms of diabetes. Who gets Type 1? Anyone, at any age, can be diagnosed with Type 1 — it is neither preventable nor curable. While the cause is unknown, studies prove that genes together with an environmental trigger result in the immune system turning on itself and destroying the body’s beta cells. Early Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes weight loss (despite an increased appetite) unquenchable thirst blurry vision decreased energy level frequent urination a fruity smell to the breath in children with no previous issues, wetting the bed in babies and toddlers, heavy diapers More Advanced Symptom stomach pain fatigue or weakness nausea or vomiting rapid, heavy breathing loss of consciousness What to do If you recognize any of the symptoms, contact your doctor immediately. A simple in-office test for sugar in the urine is used for diagnosis. If that test is positive, then a drop of blood from the fingertip will confirm diabetes. Every day, thousands of adults and children around the world are diagnosed, but many go undetected. Early diagnosis cannot prevent Type 1, but it can head off potentially devastating, even fatal, health concerns. Download Warning Signs of Type 1 Diabetes poster HERE. Check out our Educational Posters (in English, Spanish and French)! Continue reading >>

Diabetes Overview

Diabetes Overview

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are lifelong conditions. You can minimise the long-term risks and complications for your child. diabetes is a condition where the level of glucose (also known as sugar) in the blood is too high that's because the body is not using the glucose properly in type 1 diabetes, the main problem is that the insulin making cells in the pancreas are destroyed and not able to make enough insulin in type 2 diabetes, the main problem is that the body is not able to use the insulin effectively due to resistance to insulin both forms of diabetes are lifelong conditions - once diagnosed as having type 1 or type 2 diabetes, your child will always have it you can minimise the long term risks and complications for your child What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the level of glucose (also known as sugar) in the blood is too high. That's because the body is not using the glucose properly. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to allow glucose from food to move from the blood into cells in the body where it can be used for fuel for energy. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. Diabetes occurs when the insulin making cells in the pancreas are unable to make enough insulin or when there is resistance to the effects of insulin. You might find it helpful to watch a Diabetes UK animation (8 minutes 44 seconds) about diabetes and the body. © Diabetes UK. This video has been reproduced from the Diabetes UK website with the kind permission of Diabetes UK, the charity for people in the UK with diabetes. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the main problem is that the insulin making cells in the pancreas are destroyed and not able to make enough insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the main problem is that the body is not able to u Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes an unhealthy amount of a simple sugar (glucose) to build up in a person's blood. Someone with type 1 diabetes can't produce enough insulin, a hormone that moves glucose from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body, where it supplies energy and fuels growth. Normally, a child's immune system protects her body from diseases by destroying unhealthy cells and germs. But when a child has type 1 diabetes, her body also mistakenly attacks the healthy insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). Without these cells, her pancreas produces very little or no insulin, which leads to an abnormally high amount of sugar in her blood. Without proper care, type 1 diabetes can cause serious, wide-ranging health problems that can damage organs throughout the body over the long-term. If your child has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, it's understandable that you might worry. But diabetes can be kept under control by carefully monitoring your child's blood sugar and following her treatment plan. A team of doctors, nurses, and nutritionists can help your child be as healthy as possible and teach her to manage the condition so she stays that way. What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children? Symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: Extreme thirst Peeing more than usual (You might notice more wet diapers if your child is very young, or "accidents" if your child is potty trained.) Extreme hunger Weight loss Unusual tiredness Crankiness Yeast infection or diaper rash If your child has one or more of these symptoms, call his doctor right away. Type 1 diabetes symptoms can start quickly and become very serious without treatment. Get medical care immediately if your child has any of Continue reading >>

8 Red-flag Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children

8 Red-flag Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children

What is type 1 diabetes? iStock/Jovanmandic Type 1 diabetes (T1D), previously called juvenile diabetes, develops when the pancreas no longer produces insulin—a necessary hormone to allow the blood sugar (glucose) to pass into cells so that the cells can use it as energy. According to JDRF (formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), approximately 40,000 new cases of type 1 diabetes occur each year. Type 1 diabetes accounts for five to 10 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States. While T1D can happen at any age, JDRF states it’s most commonly diagnosed somewhere between infancy and late 30s, with the peak age of diagnosis in the US around age 14. What’s it like to receive a type 1 diabetes diagnosis? iStock/Cathy Yeulet If you have a child who’s been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in his or her childhood, you’re not alone. Chicago mother Beth Bernstein recounts her first thoughts when she learned her 14-year-old daughter had recently developed this type 1 diabetes. “You have to be strong for your children,” Bernstein said. “What do we do? What’s our next steps? I was very linear in my thinking. To see my daughter in so much discomfort and pain...it was horrible.” For Bernstein’s daughter, type 1 diabetes symptoms came without warning. “We couldn’t have prevented this,” she said. “It literally came out of the blue. At first, I felt guilty this had happened to my child, but then I learned there’s nothing we did to cause this.” Knowing the signs of type 1 diabetes in children is critical to control the illness. A child exhibiting symptoms of type 1 diabetes may demonstrate the following: Excessive thirst iStock/Kerkez As the body struggles to maintain adequate fluid levels, a child becomes very thirsty to prevent Continue reading >>

The Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs Every Parent Needs To Know

The Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs Every Parent Needs To Know

The Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs Every Parent Needs to Know Posted in Awareness , Children's Health , Chronic or Serious Conditions by Kim Rossi When Katys sons second-grade teacher called the house one afternoon, neither of them knew they were discussing symptoms of type 1 diabetes . The teacher contacted us because Brian was falling asleep after lunch. She was concerned that something was happening at home that was keeping him from sleeping. A little worried, Katy took Brian to his pediatrician, who simply recommended that he get to bed earlier each night. We started putting him to bed at 7:30 p.m., and he was still sleepy after lunch in school. It continued throughout the school year. Katy, her sons teacher, and the family pediatrician would later learn that Brians after-lunch fatigue was due to undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Over the summer, I noticed him drinking more and more. I eventually googled excessive thirst and read about type 1 diabetes. The pediatrician had us come in for a urine test and sent us to the ER. There, it was discovered that Brians blood glucose levels were over 700 mg/dl about seven times higher than they should be. They said we caught it early, Katy recalls, but we could have probably caught it a whole year earlier if wed just had a simple test when the first symptoms appeared. Katys familys story is not unique. Each year in the United States, 13,000 children are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (previously known as juvenile diabetes), a chronic illness marked by the bodys inability to produce its own insulin. The thousands of children each year who have the disease but go without diagnosis are at risk for the severe, life-threatening complications of untreated type 1 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes rely on the regular delivery of insuli Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs In Young Children

Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs In Young Children

© 2017 by Joslin Diabetes Center. All rights reserved. All materials contained on this site are protected by United States copyright law and may be used for personal, noncommercial use only. For permission for other use call 617-226-5815. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content. One Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02215 617-309-2400 Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes (Juvenile)? Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition that usually starts in childhood, but can occur in adults (30 to 40-year-olds). In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces very little insulin. Insulin helps cells in the body convert sugar into energy. When the pancreas cannot make enough insulin, sugar starts to build up in the blood, causing life-threatening complications. Individuals with type 1 diabetes must take some form of insulin for the rest of their lives. Unusual Thirst Symptoms Unusual thirst is a very common symptom of type 1 diabetes. This condition causes the kidneys to remove excess sugar in the blood by getting rid of more water. The water is removed through urinating, causing dehydration and dehydration causes you to drink more water. Weight Loss Symptoms Patient with type 1 diabetes develop unintentional weight loss and an increase in appetite because blood sugar levels remain high and the body metabolizes fat for energy. Disrupted glucose metabolism also causes patient to feel a lack of energy and drowsy for extended periods Excess urination also cause weight loss because many calories are leaving the body in urine. Skin Problems Symptoms The disruption in glucose metabolism in patient with type 1 diabetes causes skin changes. Type 1 diabetics are at a higher risk for bacterial infections and fungal infections. Poor blood circulation in the skin may also occur. Patient with type 1 diabetes are often infected with fungal infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans. Common fungal infections include athlete's foot, vaginal yeast infection in women, jock itch, ringworm, and diaper rashes in babies. Diaper rash caused by the yeast Candida albicans can spread to other areas of the body such as the stomach and legs. Other Dangero Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Diabetes can affect individuals of any age, including infants and children. Knowing that your baby has diabetes can be really frightening. But by learning how to perform glucose testing and give insulin, you can help your child to grow up healthy. The first thing you need to do, though, is to keep your own stress level down. Your baby can sense if you feel anxious, so it is up to you to be as brave as your little one. Types Medical experts say that Type 1 diabetes is the form of the disease most often diagnosed in infants. More commonly known as juvenile onset diabetes, this autoimmune disorder prevents the body from producing enough insulin, a hormone needed so that cells can break down glucose for energy. Type 2, or non-insulin dependent diabetes, can also affect infants. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of Type 2 diabetes. As a result, both insulin and blood sugar levels in the body continue to rise. Certain medical conditions or genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, can cause this type of diabetes as well. Symptoms The American Academy of Pediatrics tells parents to contact their child’s pediatrician immediately if she shows any of the following symptoms. Crankiness, sweating, trembling, paleness and bluish tinge to the lips or fingers are symptoms that an infant might be hypoglycemic. A glucose test should be performed, as treatment may be needed if the infant’s blood sugar is too low. A baby’s brain development requires a continuous supply of glucose. Therefore, parents must carefully manage their child’s diabetes. Likewise, when an infant’s glucose levels climb too high, hyperglycemia means that your infant may not be getting enough insulin in combination with how much you are feeding her. While infants often display no sy Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar