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What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes In A Child?

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children?

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children?

Type 1 Diabetes in Children: Symptoms, Causes & Management Often referred to as juvenile diabetes, type 1 diabetes in children is a very critical condition if no serious actions are taken to manage the symptoms. Managing diabetes at an early age requires difficult and careful regimens, which young children usually dislike. Diabetic children may feel a little emotionally left out because of their condition. However, with proper diagnosis, treatment protocol and emotional support, both parents and children may live a normal happy life. Listed below are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes: Symptom Description Increased urination and thirst Due to elevated blood sugar levels, the fluid present within the tissues is pulled out, so the child may feel thirsty. This will enhance the thirst, followed by high water intake and more frequent urination. Feeling excessively hungry Organs and muscles are also deprived of energy due to insufficient insulin in the body, which affects the normal tissue uptake of sugar in cells. All these factors can lead to excessive hunger and food intake. Weight loss Even when your child is consuming high proportion of calories, he may still lose some weight mainly because of poor energy levels. In the early stages of diabetes, a lot of people tend to lose significant weight due to fat redistribution. Fatigue Lethargy and tiredness are common symptoms as the cells are unable to get enough sugar. Irritability If the condition remains undiagnosed, your child may appear irritable with twitchy mood swings. Blurred vision Elevated blood sugar levels lead to abnormal fluid movement across the lens and other tissues of the body, which leads to blurred vision. Yeast infection Girls who are with type 1 diabetes may be affected by genital yeast infection. This infec Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Overview Type 1 diabetes in children is a condition in which your child's body no longer produces an important hormone (insulin). Your child needs insulin to survive, so you'll have to replace the missing insulin. Type 1 diabetes in children used to be known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children can be overwhelming at first. Suddenly you and your child — depending on his or her age — must learn how to give injections, count carbohydrates and monitor blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes in children requires consistent care. But advances in blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery have improved the daily management of the condition. Symptoms The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. These signs and symptoms include: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your child's bloodstream pulls fluid from tissues. As a result your child might be thirsty — and drink and urinate more than usual. A young, toilet-trained child might suddenly experience bed-wetting. Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs lack energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign of type 1 diabetes to be noticed in children. Fatigue. Lack of sugar in your child's cells might make him or her tired and lethargic. Irritability or behavior changes. In addition to mood problems, your child might suddenly have a decline in performance at school. Fruity-smelling breath. Bu Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes an unhealthy amount of a simple sugar (glucose) to build up in a person's blood. Someone with type 1 diabetes can't produce enough insulin, a hormone that moves glucose from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body, where it supplies energy and fuels growth. Normally, a child's immune system protects her body from diseases by destroying unhealthy cells and germs. But when a child has type 1 diabetes, her body also mistakenly attacks the healthy insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). Without these cells, her pancreas produces very little or no insulin, which leads to an abnormally high amount of sugar in her blood. Without proper care, type 1 diabetes can cause serious, wide-ranging health problems that can damage organs throughout the body over the long-term. If your child has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, it's understandable that you might worry. But diabetes can be kept under control by carefully monitoring your child's blood sugar and following her treatment plan. A team of doctors, nurses, and nutritionists can help your child be as healthy as possible and teach her to manage the condition so she stays that way. What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children? Symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: Extreme thirst Peeing more than usual (You might notice more wet diapers if your child is very young, or "accidents" if your child is potty trained.) Extreme hunger Weight loss Unusual tiredness Crankiness Yeast infection or diaper rash If your child has one or more of these symptoms, call his doctor right away. Type 1 diabetes symptoms can start quickly and become very serious without treatment. Get medical care immediately if your child has any of Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms & Causes

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms & Causes

Because our research informs our treatment, our diabetes team is known for our innovative treatments and science-driven approach. Children’s Hospital Boston is home to the world’s most extensive pediatric hospital research enterprise, and we partner with elite health care and biotech organizations around the globe. But as specialists in family-centered care, our physicians never forget that your child is precious, and not just a patient. In dealing with your child’s diabetes, you probably want to know the basics about what diabetes is, and how type 1 diabetes differs from other forms of the disease. What is diabetes? Diabetes (diabetes mellitus) is a lifelong condition that occurs when the body doesn’t make enough insulin, or when the body doesn’t respond properly to the insulin it makes. There are many forms of diabetes mellitus, several of which have undergone name changes as the disease has become better understood. type 1 diabetes: Formerly known as “juvenile” or “insulin-dependent” diabetes,type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune system’s failure to recognize the beta cells as belonging to the body, so it attacks and destroys them. This is why type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease. Children with type 1 diabetes must take insulin injections every day. type 2 diabetes: Formerly known as “adult onset” or “non-insulin dependent” diabetes, type 2 diabetes typically occurs in people who are overweight, physically inactive and over age 40, although more and more children are developing type 2 diabetes, possibly because of childhood obesity. Some children need insulin; others can control their diabetes with healthful eating and exercise, or oral medicines (hypoglycemic agents). MODY (maturity onset diabetes of youth): a form of dia Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Diabetes can affect individuals of any age, including infants and children. Knowing that your baby has diabetes can be really frightening. But by learning how to perform glucose testing and give insulin, you can help your child to grow up healthy. The first thing you need to do, though, is to keep your own stress level down. Your baby can sense if you feel anxious, so it is up to you to be as brave as your little one. Types Medical experts say that Type 1 diabetes is the form of the disease most often diagnosed in infants. More commonly known as juvenile onset diabetes, this autoimmune disorder prevents the body from producing enough insulin, a hormone needed so that cells can break down glucose for energy. Type 2, or non-insulin dependent diabetes, can also affect infants. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of Type 2 diabetes. As a result, both insulin and blood sugar levels in the body continue to rise. Certain medical conditions or genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, can cause this type of diabetes as well. Symptoms The American Academy of Pediatrics tells parents to contact their child’s pediatrician immediately if she shows any of the following symptoms. Crankiness, sweating, trembling, paleness and bluish tinge to the lips or fingers are symptoms that an infant might be hypoglycemic. A glucose test should be performed, as treatment may be needed if the infant’s blood sugar is too low. A baby’s brain development requires a continuous supply of glucose. Therefore, parents must carefully manage their child’s diabetes. Likewise, when an infant’s glucose levels climb too high, hyperglycemia means that your infant may not be getting enough insulin in combination with how much you are feeding her. While infants often display no sy Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

More than 15,000 children are diagnosed with type 1 every year. Make sure you know the telltale signs -- they're all too easy to dismiss. When Chloe Powell started begging for one more drink of water every night, her father, Charles, thought his then 7-year-old was using a common bedtime stall tactic. "I was irritated that she wouldn't go to sleep," admits Dr. Powell, who's a family physician in Dallas. With all she was drinking, he wasn't surprised when she began wetting the bed. But when Chloe couldn't make it through a conversation without having to use the bathroom, he became concerned. "I figured she had a urinary-tract infection, and she'd take some antibiotics and feel better," says Dr. Powell. He wasn't at all prepared for what his daughter's urine test showed: a dangerously high level of sugar that was a clear indicator of type 1 diabetes. In an instant, Chloe, now 10, went from being a kid who never thought twice about the foods she ate or the energy she burned to one who'd face a lifetime of carbohydrate counting, finger pricks, and insulin injections. A Disease on the Rise Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that causes the body's immune system to mistakenly destroy healthy cells in the pancreas that produce the hormone insulin. (Type 2, on the other hand, occurs when the body doesn't respond to the insulin that's being made.) Insulin ensures that sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream gets into the body's cells where it's needed for energy; without insulin, sugar builds up in the blood, which can be deadly. It's important to begin insulin therapy as soon as possible because high blood-sugar levels can cause permanent vision and nerve problems as well as damage to blood vessels, increasing the risk of heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. Since the 198 Continue reading >>

Children And Diabetes

Children And Diabetes

Tweet Throughout the world, incidences of diabetes are on the rise, and consequently so is diabetes amongst children. Most children are affected by type 1 diabetes in childhood. However, the number of children and young adults affected by type 2 diabetes is beginning to rise, particularly in America. Approximately 90% of young people with diabetes suffer from type 1 and the number of patients who are children varies from place to place. A figure of 17 per 100,000 children developing diabetes each year has been reported. As metabolic syndrome, obesity and bad diets spread, so too have the first incidences of type 2 diabetes, previously incredibly rare. Further relevant pages Diabetes & pregnancy Juvenile diabetes Keeping your kids free from diabetes Teenage diabetes and blood glucose testing How is diabetes caused in children? The actual causes of the diabetic condition are little understood, in both children and adults. It is widely speculated that diabetes occurred when inherited genetic characteristics are triggered by environmental factors such as diet or exercise. Many type 1 diabetic children do not have diabetes in their families however, so the exact cause remains a mystery. Type 2 diabetes amongst children is usually caused by an extremely bad diet from a very young age, coupled with a sedentary lifestyle without exercise. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes In Children

Signs Of Diabetes In Children

What to look for: Symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children One of the early signs of diabetes in children is increased urination and thirst. When blood-sugar is high it triggers a reaction in the body that pulls fluid from tissues. This will leave your son or daughter constantly thirsty, resulting in a need for more bathroom breaks throughout the day. Below are some other warning signs that you should be aware of. Fatigue: If your child is constantly tired it may be a sign that his or her body is having trouble turning sugar in the bloodstream into energy. Changes in vision: High blood sugar levels can lead to blurred vision or other eyesight problems. Fruity smelling breath: If your kid’s breath smells fruity, it could be a result of excess sugar in the blood. Extreme hunger and unexplained weight loss: When your son or daughter’s muscles and organs aren’t receiving enough energy, it can trigger extreme hunger. And sudden weight loss—especially if he or she is eating more—should not be ignored. Unusual behavior: If your child seems more moody or restless than normal—and it’s in conjunction with the symptoms above—it could be cause for concern. Other symptoms of diabetes in children Be on the lookout if your child is lethargic, shows heavy breathing, or experiences nausea and vomiting. When it goes untreated, type 1 diabetes can be life-threatening. If you’re concerned that your son or daughter is showing signs of childhood diabetes it’s important that you schedule a doctor’s appointment as soon as possible. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than normal… The reality is that signs o Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children

What is type 1 diabetes in children? Diabetes is a condition in which the body can't make enough insulin, or can't use insulin normally. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. The body's immune system damages the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Insulin is a hormone. It helps sugar (glucose) in the blood get into cells of the body to be used as fuel. When glucose can’t enter the cells, it builds up in the blood. This is called high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). High blood sugar can cause problems all over the body. It can damage blood vessels and nerves. It can harm the eyes, kidneys, and heart. It can also cause symptoms such as tiredness. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a long-term (chronic) condition. It may start at any age. Only 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. Insulin from the pancreas must be replaced with insulin injections or an insulin pump. There are two forms of type 1 diabetes: Immune-mediated diabetes. This is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system damages the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This is the most common kind of type 1 diabetes. Idiopathic type 1. This refers to rare forms of the disease with no known cause. What causes type 1 diabetes in a child? The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Researchers think some people inherit a gene than can cause type 1 diabetes if a trigger such as a virus occurs. Which children are at risk for type 1 diabetes? A child is more at risk for type 1 diabetes if he or she has any of these risk factors: A family member with the condition Caucasian race Being from Finland or Sardinia Is age 4 to 6, or 10 to 14 What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in a child? Type 1 diabetes often appears suddenly. In children, type 1 diabetes symptoms may be like flu symptoms. Symptoms ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Until recently, the common type of diabetes in children and teens was type 1. It was called juvenile diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose,or sugar, get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much sugar stays in the blood. Now younger people are also getting type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But now it is becoming more common in children and teens, due to more obesity. With Type 2 diabetes, the body does not make or use insulin well. Children have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if they are overweight or have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or are not active. Children who are African American, Hispanic, Native American/Alaska Native, Asian American, or Pacific Islander also have a higher risk. To lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in children Have them maintain a healthy weight Be sure they are physically active Have them eat smaller portions of healthy foods Limit time with the TV, computer, and video Children and teens with type 1 diabetes may need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes may be controlled with diet and exercise. If not, patients will need to take oral diabetes medicines or insulin. A blood test called the A1C can check on how you are managing your diabetes. Continue reading >>

Children & Type 2 Diabetes

Children & Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or the body does not properly use the insulin it makes. As a result, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood instead of being used for energy. The body gets sugar from foods like bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, milk and fruit. To use this sugar, the body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body to control the level of sugar in the blood. Type 2 diabetes was once a condition that occurred only in adults. Today we see it more in teens and even in children. Most of these children are from ethnic groups at high risk for type 2 diabetes (African, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian and Aboriginal). In Canada 44% of children who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are of Aboriginal heritage. Who is at risk? Type 2 diabetes in children has increased around the world over the past 20 years. Factors that increase a child’s risk for developing type 2 diabetes include: Being overweight or inactive Being a member of an ethnic group at high risk for type 2 diabetes (African, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian and Aboriginal) Having a family history of type 2 diabetes Being born to a mother who had diabetes during pregnancy Having any of the following: Dark, velvety patches of skin on the neck and under the arms (a skin condition known as acanthosis nigricans) High blood pressure Polycystic ovarian syndrome (a condition in females that can include no menstrual periods, unusual hair growth and being overweight) High levels of fatty deposits in the liver Taking certain medications for mental health conditions Symptoms of type 2 diabetes Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Going to the bathroom more Blurred vision Yeast infections Tiredness However, many children with type 2 diabetes do Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

With more than a third of diabetes cases in the United States occurring in people over the age of 65, diabetes is often referred to as an age-related condition. But around 208,000 children and adolescents are estimated to have diabetes, and this number is increasing. Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of the condition among children and adolescents. A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that type 1 diabetes prevalence stands at 1.93 in every 1,000 children and adolescents, while type 2 diabetes affects 0.24 in every 1,000. In 2014, Medical News Today reported that, based on a study published in JAMA, rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased significantly among American children and teenagers. The study found that incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged up to 9 years increased by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009, while incidence of type 2 diabetes among youths aged 10-19 years rose by 30.5 percent. The researchers note: "The increases in prevalence reported herein are important because such youth with diabetes will enter adulthood with several years of disease duration, difficulty in treatment, an increased risk of early complications and increased frequency of diabetes during reproductive years, which may further increase diabetes in the next generation." Contents of this article: Here are some key points about diabetes in children. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Type 1 and 2 diabetes are both increasing in the youth of America Often, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children develop over just a few weeks If type 1 diabetes is not spotted, the child can develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) What is diabetes in children? Type 1 diabetes in children, previously called juve Continue reading >>

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Children?

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Children?

Years ago, it was rare to hear about a child with type 2 diabetes. Doctors used to think kids only got type 1. It was even called juvenile diabetes for a long time. Not anymore. Now, according to the CDC, more than 208,000 people younger than 20 have this disease. That number includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Here's what you need to know if your child is diagnosed. You've probably heard diabetes and high blood sugar mentioned together. Here's what happens. Your digestive system breaks down carbohydrates into a type of sugar called glucose. Your pancreas creates a hormone, known as insulin, that moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it’s used for fuel. In type 2 diabetes, the cells in your child's body don’t respond to the insulin, and glucose builds up in her bloodstream. This is called insulin resistance. Eventually, the sugar levels in her body get too high for it to handle. That could lead to other conditions in the future, like heart disease, blindness, and kidney failure. Type 2 diabetes is most likely to affect kids who are: Girls Overweight Have a family history of diabetes American Indian, African-American, Asian, or Hispanic/Latino Have a problem called insulin resistance The single biggest cause of type 2 diabetes in children is extra weight. In the U.S., nearly 1 out of every 3 children is overweight. Once a child gets too heavy, she’s twice as likely to get diabetes. One or more of these things may contribute to extra weight or obesity: Unhealthy eating Family members (alive or dead) who've been overweight Rarely, a hormone problem or other medical condition As with adults, type 2 diabetes is more likely to affect children who carry extra weight around the middle. At first, there may be no symptoms. Over time, you may notice: Hun Continue reading >>

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

Source: Web exclusive, August 2010 Over 300,000 Canadians have type 1 diabetes, yet when your own child is diagnosed with this disease, it can come as a shock. ‘Most kids who get diabetes do not have another family member with it,’ points out diabetes specialist Dr. Maureen Clement in Vernon, B.C. ‘Often, it’s just a bolt of lightning.’ Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed during childhood, often between the ages of 10 to 13. There’s nothing parents can do to prevent this type of diabetes. However, if you notice signs your child might have the disease, you can take action to prevent a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), in which the body runs out of insulin to process sugar and begins to break down fat instead. If your child shows indications of type 1 diabetes, says Clement, then don’t delay in visiting your pediatrician. ‘Don’t say, ‘let’s wait a week or two.’ Get your kid tested that day to make sure they don’t have diabetes.’ And if it does turn out that your child is diabetic, remember that as long as the disease is well managed, she can still enjoy good health her whole life. Here’s what to watch out for. Sign 1: Unquenchable thirst Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may be constantly thirsty. That’s because as their blood-glucose level rises, fluid is pulled from their body tissues. These kids may especially crave sweet, cold drinks. Sign 2: Frequent urination What goes in must come out, so it stands to reason that a child who is drinking more will also visit the washroom more. If your kid is taking an unusual number of bathroom breaks, there may be an underlying and serious reason behind it. A younger child who was previously toilet trained at night may start to wet the bed again. Sign 3: Weight loss A Continue reading >>

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