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What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock?

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetes symptoms can quickly turn into emergencies. The disease of diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, claiming nearly 70,000 lives. Responding promptly to symptoms of a diabetic emergency can be lifesaving. Causes and types Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes inhibit the body's ability to manage blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes does so by destroying the cells that produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes reduces how responsive the body is to insulin, while not enough insulin is produced to counter the sugar in the body. Hence, most diabetic emergencies are related to disruptions in a person's blood sugar levels. Occasionally, even too much of a drug being used to treat diabetes can trigger a diabetic emergency. The most common diabetic emergencies include the following: Severe hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is when blood sugar levels are abnormally low. When blood sugar dips very low, it becomes a medical emergency. Hypoglycemia normally only occurs in people with diabetes who take medication that lowers blood sugar. Blood sugar levels may drop dangerously low when a person is: consuming too much alcohol exercising, especially without adjusting food intake or insulin dosage missing or delaying meals overdosing on diabetic medication Diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body does not have enough insulin to break down glucose properly, and hormones that normally work opposite insulin are high. Over time, the body releases hormones that break down fat to provide fuel. This produces acids called ketones. As ketones build up in the body, ketoacidosis can occur. Common causes of ketoacidosis include: uncontrolled or untreated diabetes an illness or infection that changes hormone production an illness or infection that chang Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Diabetic shock occurs when blood sugar levels plummet, causing a disruption in the proper functioning of the body and brain. A significant drop in blood sugar due to excessive insulin is called hypoglycemia; diabetic shock is an extreme result of this condition. Diabetic shock, also called insulin shock, is a serious health risk for diabetics. It is important for people to recognize early symptoms so that the diabetic can receive the medical attention he or she needs. Symptoms Mental State The brain is one of the first parts of the body to be affected by this severe blood sugar drop. Some mental changes that could indicate diabetic shock are: Confusion Memory loss Irritability Aggressive behavior Difficulty engaging in conversation Physical Symptoms Physical symptoms to be on alert for are: Dizziness Weakness Lethargy Hunger Sweating Rapid heart rate Headaches Unconsciousness If the hypoglycemia goes untreated, the body will no longer be able to function and the diabetic will faint and become unconscious. This person will not be able to be roused from this state. His or her skin might feel cool and sweaty, and his or her pulse will be either extremely weak or rapid. If untreated, the diabetic may go into a coma. Seizure With the brain not functioning properly, a hypoglycemic person may start to have seizures. When in a seizure, the person will fall to the ground and thrash his or her arms or legs. Muscles may start to twitch erratically. Treatment If the diabetic has not become unconscious or had seizures, the best way to raise his or her blood sugar level is to eat or drink something with sugar in it. Glucose tablets are also a good remedy for hypoglycemia. After eating a snack, the diabetic should test his or her blood sugar every 15 minutes and eat more snacks if the Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Diabetic shock is a medical emergency in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus. It occurs when body contains too much insulin decreasing the blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia). It is also called insulin shock, severe hypoglycemia or simply, low blood sugar. The insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. The insulin decreases the blood glucose by moving the glucose into the cells. The endogenous insulin secretion is tightly regulated according to the blood glucose levels so that glucose levels neither increase nor decrease disproportionately. In diabetic individuals, this mechanism is disturbed and blood glucose levels rise. To normalize the increased blood glucose levels, insulin and other oral anti-diabetic medicines are given. In diabetic person, the blood glucose may decrease dramatically and diabetic shock may develop if the person: Takes too much insulin or other anti-diabetic medicines by mistake Misses the meal completely after taking insulin Exercises excessively Drinks too much alcohol without eating Symptoms of Diabetic Shock: The glucose is the necessary energy fuel for our brain and nervous system. When blood glucose levels decrease in diabetic shock, energy supply to the brain is decreased causing most of the symptoms that may be divided into mild, moderate or severe depending upon the glucose levels. The mild symptoms are as follows: Excessive sweating The patients with low blood sugar sweat profusely, even in cold temperatures. They may develop the tremors and shakiness within their whole body. Pallor These patients also become pale and cold. These are due to the effects of some blood hormones, catecholamine, that are released in response to low blood sugar. Hunger The low blood glucose levels naturally stimulate the hunger center in the brain ca Continue reading >>

6 Early Signs Of A Diabetic Coma—and How To Prevent It

6 Early Signs Of A Diabetic Coma—and How To Prevent It

Tatiana Ayazo/RD.com Diabetic Coma Symptoms: You feel shaky—or tired Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) each have different warning signs, but can lead to the same result—diabetic coma. “Warning signs that you are in danger because the blood sugar is dropping or is too low include feeling shaky,” says Gillian Goddard, MD, board certified in internal medicine and endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, from Park Avenue Endocrinology & Nutrition. Learn about silent diabetes symptoms you might miss. On the other hand, you could notice high blood sugar leaving you fatigued, according to the Mayo Clinic. You feel like you’re starving—or parched If your blood sugar is low, “you may feel ravenously hungry,” says Dr. Goddard. And low blood sugar is also associated with frequent urination. Hyperglycemia, on the other hand, can lead to dry mouth and a parched feeling. You’ll want to avoid these foods if you’re diabetic. You become erratic As blood sugar drops to dangerous levels, your behavior may become unusual. “Family members often report that their loved ones may not make sense or that they get angry or difficult when their blood sugars are low,” Dr. Goddard says. If you’re feeling confused, that’s a sign that you need to measure your blood sugar. “If a diabetic person passes out, you should always be concerned that low blood sugar may be the cause,” Dr. Goddard says. And a racing pulse is often related to high blood sugar. Check out the biggest myths about diabetes. You sweat profusely—or need to urinate a lot Profuse sweating is a sign of low blood sugar, while frequent trips to the bathroom is a sign of uncontrolled high blood sugar. Try these tricks for living better with diabetes. You start having seizure Continue reading >>

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

What is insulin shock? After taking an insulin shot, a person with diabetes might on occasion forget to eat (or eat less than they normally do). If this happens, they may end up with too much insulin in their blood. This, in turn, can lead to hypoglycemia, also called low blood sugar. A serious condition called insulin shock may occur if a person: ignores mild hypoglycemia takes too much insulin by mistake misses a meal completely does excessive unusual exercise without changing their carbohydrate intake Insulin shock is a diabetic emergency. It involves symptoms that, if left untreated, can lead to diabetic coma, brain damage, and even death. How insulin works When we consume food or beverages that contain carbohydrates, the body converts them into glucose. Glucose is a type of sugar that fuels the body, giving it the energy it needs to perform everyday functions. Insulin is a hormone that works like a key. It opens the door in the body’s cells so they can absorb glucose and use it as fuel. People with diabetes may lack enough insulin or have cells that aren’t able to use insulin as they should. If the cells of the body aren’t able to absorb the glucose properly, it causes excess glucose in blood. This is called high blood glucose, which is linked with a number of health issues. High blood glucose can cause eye and foot problems, heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, and nerve damage. Insulin shots help people with diabetes use glucose more efficiently. Taking an insulin shot before eating helps the body absorb and use glucose from the food. The result is a more balanced and healthy blood sugar level. Usually, it works great. Sometimes, however, things go wrong. What causes insulin shock? Having too much insulin in your blood can lead to having too little gluco Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

A diabetic coma is one of the most life-threatening complications of diabetes. The main symptom is unconsciousness. A diabetic coma can be the result of having a blood glucose level that is too high (hyperglycemia) or a blood glucose level that is too low (hypoglycemia). The diabetic in a diabetic coma is unconscious and can die if the condition is not treated. Symptoms of Diabetic Coma Before you lapse into a diabetic coma, there are usually warning signs of blood sugar levels that are too low or blood sugar levels that are too high. For example, if the blood sugar is too high, the you may experience tiredness, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, increased urination, increased thirst, a rapid heart rate, a dry mouth, and a fruity smell to your breath. If the blood sugar is too low, you may experience signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, including weakness, tiredness, anxiety, tremulousness, nervousness, nausea, confusion, problems communicating, light-headedness, hunger, or dizziness. If you have had diabetes for many years, you may not have many symptoms of low blood sugar and won’t know you have the condition prior to falling into a coma. If you suspect that you have either high blood sugar or low blood sugar, you need to check your blood glucose levels and do what your doctor has recommended for you to treat the disease. If you don’t feel better after trying home remedies, you need to call 911 and get some kind of emergency care. Causes of Diabetic Coma The main cause of a diabetic coma is an extremely high blood sugar or an extremely low blood sugar. The following medical conditions can cause a diabetic coma: Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome. This is a condition in which the blood sugar is as high as 600 mg/d: or 33.3 mmol per liter. There are no ketones in the u Continue reading >>

Knowing The Signs Of Diabetic Shock Could Save A Life

Knowing The Signs Of Diabetic Shock Could Save A Life

Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Caption Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400% Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadow Font FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall Caps DefaultsDone Diabetic shock, or severe hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), can strike at the most inopportune times, like while you’re driving. “I haven’t ever had an accident, but I’ve sometimes gone home and wondered, ‘I don’t remember driving home.’ I’ve had some close calls,” Laurie Hanauer tells Local 12’s Liz Bonis. It’s often Lori’s husband, Steve, however, who sees that she’s in trouble, as her blood sugar levels plummet. “I can usually tell, a lot of times, before she does, actually. She kind of gets a blank expression on her face, kind of almost moves in slow motion,” he explains. Related: Do I Need Diabetes Education? Diabetic Shock: The Warning Signs Laurie has Type I diabetes, a chronic disease in which there is a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood and requires insulin to survive. Mich Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock

Diabetic Shock

Diabetic shock emergencies occur either when your blood glucose level becomes dangerously low (hypoglycemia) or when it becomes dangerously high (hyperglycemia). Hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, can occur in diabetics for a variety of reasons. It can be the result of simply having skipped a meal or having exercised too much for the amount of food you have consumed or medication you have taken. It can also be the consequence of insulin or insulin promoting medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar levels can range from mild to severe: Shakiness Weakness Dizziness/Lightheadedness Confusion Sweating/Clamminess Headache Irritability Impaired vision Heart palpitations/Racing heart Seizures Unconsciousness Since the problem in hypoglycemia is low blood glucose, the treatment for mild symptoms is a dose (usually 15 to 20 grams) of glucose or simple carbohydrate, which is easily broken down into glucose. A 15-to-20-gram dose of glucose can be in the form of a variety of things from glucose tablets to 4 oz. of juice to a tablespoon of honey. For hypoglycemia treatment, it’s imperative that you check your blood glucose level 15 minutes later to be certain you are back within a safe range. In more severe cases of hypoglycemia—true hypoglycemic emergencies such as when diabetic shock (including seizures or unconsciousness) occurs—injectable glucagon, a hormone that causes your liver to release glucose into the blood stream, is needed. Glucagon injection kits are available by prescription and can be injected into the arm, buttocks, or thigh. Diabetics who have glucagon kits should be sure their friends, family, and coworkers are educated on glucagon administration in the event of an emergency. The glucagon typically takes effect within five to 15 minutes. Oral glucose should Continue reading >>

The Danger Of Diabetic Shock

The Danger Of Diabetic Shock

One of the most important things diabetics must learn about their disease is the danger of diabetic shock. Sufferers of diabetes 1 and 2 know all-to-well the dangers of excess sugar, but dangerously low levels of blood sugar can affect diabetics just as profoundly. One of those profound effects of low blood sugar is diabetic or insulin shock. If left unrecognized or untreated, its symptoms are severe and may even lead to death. Diabetic Shock: What Causes It? Insulin shock is the direct result of low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) in diabetics — especially those who are receiving treatment with insulin or other diabetes medication. Low blood sugar for a diabetic is anything below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) as red on a blood sugar meter. When blood sugar levels are this low, the body starts to show signs of distress. In diabetics, there can be many reasons why their blood sugar may drop low enough to cause insulin shock. The most common cause of these blood sugar dips is skipped meals. But diabetics may also suffer low blood sugar if they take too much diabetes medication (insulin or pills) or when they exercise in excess of their normal routine. Diabetic Shock: Symptoms Diabetic shock signs may vary from mild to moderate. Mild symptoms often include a shaky or weak feeling that comes on quickly out of nowhere. Sufferers may also experience a racing heart or a tingling feeling in their tongue or fingertips. Or, they may break out in a sweat. More moderate symptoms may also cause neuroglycopenia. These symptoms largely affect the brain. Sufferers may feel anxious, moody or severely depressed for no discernible reason. Their personalities may change abruptly, or their moods may switch from one extreme to the next. Neuroglycopenia may also cause confusion, slu Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetic Coma And Its First Aid

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetic Coma And Its First Aid

What are the Signs and Symptoms for Diabetic Coma? Extreme rise in the level of your blood sugar or extreme lowering of the level of your blood sugar is generally the usual sign and symptom noticed before a sudden diabetic coma attack. People suffering from high levels of blood sugar may experience the following before a diabetic coma: Increased thirst for water Frequent urgency of urinating Tiredness Vertigo and feeling of vomiting Breathlessness Pain in stomach Breath odor seems to be fruity Feeling of dry mouth Increased heartbeat People suffering from low levels of blood sugar may experience before a diabetic coma: Nervousness or weakness Anxiousness Tiredness Increased production of body sweat Starvation Nausea Light headedness Trouble in normal speaking Ambiguity/ confusion Hypoglycemia unawareness is one syndrome which happens to people with prolonged diabetic conditions. People under such syndrome cannot understand the signals of dropped blood sugar in them. All the diabetic patients should check our sugar level in the blood at regular intervals. If possible it is suggested to buy diabetes device which can give you correct information on your blood sugar levels. Thus you would be able to remain alert about the growth of diabetes in the body and get immediate medical treatment. You can remain aware of the conditions of diabetes and can support yourselves better during emergencies. Diabetic coma is a severe medical emergency that needs immediate support. Dial 911 immediately for support if you start feeling like somebody with you who has diabetes is about to faint or has already fainted. Any person suffering from diabetes can get affected by diabetic coma. People with diabetes of the type 1 are in bigger risk due to hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis. People w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetic Shock: Everything You Need To Know

What Is It? If you are diabetic, you should know that Diabetic Shock or Extreme Hypoglycemia is a serious health risk. It is medical emergency wherein sugar levels fall below 70 mg/dl. Diabetic shock symptoms come from the body’s reaction to too much insulin or too little sugar. So, it’s crucial for every diabetic to know why it happens, what to expect and how to treat it. Why Does Diabetic Shock Happen? Insulin helps sugar enter the cells. Diabetic shock or Insulin Reaction is the result of having too much insulin or too little sugar in the body, at any point of time. The condition could happen due to: Excess medication Eating less Skipping a meal Exercising too much The intake of too much alcohol Sudden/excess stress An acute illness Drug-induced hypoglycemia continues to be one of the most common diabetic shock causes. For those who medicate with insulin, it’s important to know how much your body needs. If you take insulin before meal-time but skip a meal, or decide to have just a salad, your blood sugar could plummet. This condition, also called insulin shock, can also occur if you take an overdose of insulin. But, that’s just one cause of extreme hypoglycemia. If you exercise too much or out of routine after taking your diabetes medication, it could push your blood sugar to an extreme low too. What Are The Warning Signs? Bear in mind that the symptoms of hypoglycemic shock may seem mild at first. But, they should not be ignored. If it isn’t treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that could result in losing consciousness. Thus, one would require immediate medical attention. In worst cases, it can lead to diabetic coma and death. Some hypoglycemic shock symptoms: Sweating Shakiness Dizziness Rapid heart rate Extreme hunger Irritab Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

In people with diabetes, a diabetic coma occurs when severe levels of either high or low uncontrolled blood sugar are not corrected. If treated quickly, a person will make a rapid recovery from a diabetic coma. However, diabetic coma can be fatal or result in brain damage. It is important for people with diabetes to control their blood sugars and know what to do when their blood sugar levels are not within their target range. The severe symptoms of uncontrolled blood sugar that can come before a diabetic coma include vomiting, difficulty breathing, confusion, weakness, and dizziness. Recovery from diabetic coma If a diabetic coma is not treated within a couple of hours of it developing, it can cause irreversible brain damage. If no treatment is received, a diabetic coma will be fatal. In addition, having blood sugar levels that continue to be too low or too high can be bad for long-term health. This remains true even if they do not develop into diabetic coma. Recognizing the early signs of low or high blood sugar levels and regular monitoring can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels within the healthy range. Doing so will also reduce the risk of associated complications and diabetic coma. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a long-term condition in which the body is unable to control the level of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes is caused by either a lack of insulin, the body's inability to use insulin correctly, or both. In people who don't have diabetes, insulin usually ensures that excess glucose is removed from the bloodstream. It does this by stimulating cells to absorb the glucose they need for energy from the blood. Insulin also causes any remaining glucose to be stored in the liver as a substance called glycogen. The production of insul Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock: 7 Signs To Watch For

Diabetic Shock: 7 Signs To Watch For

Viewers of ABC’s fitness show, “Extreme Weight Loss,” remember Rod Durham as the 50-year-old teacher from Tallahassee, Fla. with the cherubic smile. They’ll remember that he lost almost 180 pounds during the 2014 season of the show. They may remember his efforts to help others lose weight, too. Unfortunately, he also is remembered as a cautionary tale for friends and loved ones who suffer from diabetes. Durham, 52, died recently of diabetic complications after suffering from diabetic shock and slipping into a coma. Diabetic shock – a state of severe hypoglycemia, or extremely low blood sugar – can be extremely serious among people suffering from diabetes, even those who are closely managing their blood sugar levels. Shock usually happens in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Because their bodies don’t produce enough insulin by themselves, Type 2 diabetics may need several self-administered insulin shots a day, measuring their blood sugar before each shot. They also need to adjust their exercise and eating habits to match their insulin levels. If they miscalculate the amount of insulin needed for a shot or are unable to eat in a timely manner and their insulin may become too high, causing a dangerous drop in blood sugar. That’s diabetic shock. At that point, the diabetes sufferer may not be able to help themselves; they may not be able to recognize anything is wrong. Higher cognitive functions are affected, and they may appear drunk. In severe cases, they may lose consciousness. If they’re alone or unaided, they could fall into a coma. Death may also result. Many seasoned diabetics are aware when their blood sugar is low; however, if those levels are low enough to affect their lucidity, it’s important for others to recognize symptoms. Common signs include Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetic Shock: How To Be Prepared For The Condition

Signs Of Diabetic Shock: How To Be Prepared For The Condition

If you suffer from diabetes, you may want to learn about the signs of diabetic shock, just in case. Knowing the signs can help you deal with emergency situation – after all, diabetic shock is considered as diabetic emergency. There are some reasons why such condition can happen and knowing them can prevent such thing from happening. Signs of Diabetic Shock: Knowing the Basic You see, the body has its own mechanism and function to work properly. When you consume carbs, your body will convert it to glucose, which is a type of natural sugar used by the body as the fuel. Glucose will be converted to energy, allowing you to do your daily activties and duties. The insulin is the hormone whose function is to open the cells inside the body, allowing the cells to absorb the glucose. Diabetic people have problems with the insulin. It is either they don’t have enough insulin or their body isn’t able to process the insulin properly. Excessive glucose can happen when the cells aren’t able to absorb it properly, leading to a condition called ‘high blood glucose’. This is usually related to a certain condition like stroke, heart issue, foot and eye problem, nerve damage, and also kidney issue. That’s why these people need the insulin shots so the glucose level can be managed efficiently. In most cases, diabetic people using the shots can run an active, healthy, and balanced life. Read More : Fruits are Safe for Diabetics Signs of Diabetic Shock: The Causes If your body has too much insulin, it can lead to the condition where you have too little glucose. Basically, when your blood sugar is too low, your body doesn’t have enough energy to work properly and it will shut down automatically. And that’s when you start seeing the signs of diabetic shock. It is all about bal Continue reading >>

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