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What Are The First Symptoms Of Sugar Diabetes?

Symptoms Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the Primary Symptoms of Diabetes? The most prevalent symptom of diabetes (Type I and II) is elevated blood sugar levels. In Type I (insulin dependent / early onset) diabetes, this is caused by the body not producing enough insulin to properly regulate blood sugar. In Type II (non insulin dependent/adult onset) diabetes, it is caused by the body developing resistance to insulin, so it cannot properly use what it produces. However, high blood sugar is not something you can see in the mirror at home, so it is useful to know the side-effects of high blood sugar, which are commonly recognized as the noticeable diabetes symptoms. If you find yourself experiencing many of these symptoms on a consistent, long term basis, you should visit a doctor to be tested for diabetes. Ignoring (or not recognizing) the symptoms of diabetes can lead to long-term serious health risks and complications from untreated diabetes. Some of the common 'early warning' signs of diabetes are: Excessive thirst One of the first symptoms of diabetes is often excessive thirst that is unrelated to exercise, hot weather, or short-term illness. Excessive hunger You are still hungry all the time even though you've eaten. Frequent urination Frequent urination is often noticed because you must wake up repeatedly during the night. Fatigue Tiredness and fatigue, possibly severe enough to make you fall asleep unexpectedly after meals, is one of the most common symptoms of diabetes. Sudden weight loss Rapid and/or sudden weight loss (any dramatic change in weight is a sign to visit a doctor) Get tested if you are concerned While many of the signs and symptoms of diabetes can also be related to other causes, testing for diabetes is very easy, and the constant/regular presence of one or more of these symptoms Continue reading >>

14 Early Warning Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Super High (eat These Foods To Reverse It)

14 Early Warning Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Super High (eat These Foods To Reverse It)

Are you always hungry? Have you gained weight despite cutting calories? Or, do you frequently experience stomach problems? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, you could be experiencing high blood sugar symptoms. Don’t get tricked into thinking that high blood sugar is only something diabetics should worry about. The truth is that anyone can experience spikes in their blood sugar levels when they eat certain foods – and it’s not just candy, sodas and cakes that cause these spikes. The real danger is when your blood sugar levels stay high for extended periods of time, which can lead to diabetes or other serious health problems. But, if you are familiar with the high blood sugar symptoms and recognize when you begin to experience them regularly, it can motivate you to take the necessary steps to get your blood sugar under control. What are the causes of high blood sugar symptoms? There are a number of different factors that contribute to high blood sugar symptoms including: Poor diet Lack of regular exercise Stress Certain health conditions Use of certain medications What are the high blood sugar symptoms? Having high blood sugar does not automatically mean you have diabetes. High blood sugar is only a symptom of diabetes. In fact, an individual experiencing hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) could have no symptoms at all. But, the most commonly-experienced high blood sugar symptoms include: Increased thirst Dry mouth Always being hungry Frequent urination and/or urination during the night Dry and itchy skin Daily fatigue or extreme tiredness Difficulty concentrating Excess abdominal fat/weight gain Sponsored by Revcontent Trending Now Recurrent infections Blurred vision Impotence Slow healing of cuts and wounds Stomach problems Using a Glycemic Index Continue reading >>

4 Subtle Signs You’re Developing Diabetes

4 Subtle Signs You’re Developing Diabetes

Diabetes can sneak up on you. That’s what reportedly happened to Rob Kardashian, the 28-year-old reality TV personality, this week. According to TMZ, he was rushed to an L.A. hospital and diagnosed with the condition. Rob had put on weight recently, but he no idea he had diabetes. And he’s not alone: 25 percent of people with diabetes don’t know they’re afflicted, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Paying attention to prediabetes warning signs could save you from an ER visit like Kardashian’s—and prevent you from ever developing full-blown diabetes. Here are the top silent alarms. (If these sound familiar, exercising and losing weight can reduce your risk. Try The Get Back in Shape Workout: A 28-Day Program That Will Transform Your Body!) 1. You know what the bathroom looks like at night. Because you visit often. As blood sugar levels go up, diabetes symptoms like frequent urination worsen. “If 4 months ago you were getting up once in the middle of the night to pee and now you’re getting up three times, that’s a clue you need to get checked out,” says Andrew Bremer, M.D., Ph.D., program director at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This may also be a symptom of prostate issues (such as an enlarged prostate). Either way, it’s best to bring the issue up with your doctor so he can rule out potential causes. 2. Your skin looks dirty. You notice dark patches of skin on the back of your neck, but no matter how hard you rub, they won’t come off. How come? Insulin resistance can cause a condition called acanthosis nigricans, which may appear during pre-diabetes. The dark, velvety patches can ring your neck and also appear on your elbows and knees. Once you get your glucose under control, the p Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms And Warning Signs In Women

Diabetes Symptoms And Warning Signs In Women

Diabetes can happen at any age, though type 2 diabetes is more common in those over 45 years of age. Many of the risks for diabetes are the same between men and women, but there are some differences. The risk of developing diabetes is higher for people who: Are overweight or obese Are do not lead active lives Have high levels of fats called triglycerides, low levels of "good" cholesterol, or both Are a member of a high-risk race or ethnicity Have a history of high blood sugar Have a first-degree relative with diabetes Have conditions that are associated with the body not using insulin effectively (insulin resistance) Contents of this article: Women and diabetes One condition that is unique to women and linked to the body not using insulin effectively (insulin resistance) is polycystic ovarian syndrome. In this condition, the ovaries become enlarged and are unable to release eggs properly. Other unique risk factors include a history of gestational diabetes or having given birth to a baby weighing over 9 pounds. According to the National Institutes of Heath (NIH), close to one-third of women with diabetes do not know they have the disease. It is recommended that screening for adults of both genders be done in those over the age of 45 who are overweight or obese and who have one of the risk factors listed above. On the other hand, men are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women. The exact reasons why are unclear, however. One possible reason could be that men tend to carry their weight in the belly area more often than women, which can increase insulin resistance. Men are also more likely than women to develop heart disease as a result of their diabetes. The risks become relatively similar between the sexes once women reach menopause. Complications of diabetes fo Continue reading >>

What Were Your First Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

What Were Your First Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

11 Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes (Explained in details) The dangers of type 2 diabetes cannot be overemphasized this is due to its nature because it doesn’t necessarily cause any obvious symptoms. It is known as ‘silent killer’ because it doesn’t show earlier signs. There are cases where doctors do not detect diabetes until long-term complications associated with the disease, develop. Some of the diseases are heart problems and eye diseases. It is advisable for one to go on regular checks in order to prevent type 2 diabetes. Prevention of this disease can be achieved through regular checking of blood sugar levels. If you think you may have diabetes, seek treatment as soon as possible. The better you manage diabetes over time, the less like you are to develop serious complications. The following signs, symptoms and conditions can be associated with type 2 diabetes Frequent Need to Urinate [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="810"] Photo Credit: joebelanger / Stock photos, royalty-free images & video clips[/caption] Medically, this is known as polyuria and it is one of the early signs of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Frequent need to urinate occurs when the blood sugar levels is elevated above 160-180mg/dL therefore, glucose begins to leak into the urine. Consequently, the amount of glucose in the urine increases, the kidney starts to work harder to eliminate more water in an attempt to dilute the urine. This is enough for a diabetic to feel the urge to urinate more often. Increased Thirst [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="810"] This is not unconnected with the first symptom. As a diabetic patient urinates more often, he/she gets dehydrated faster, therefore sending signals to the brain to get more water. Drinking more water will aggravate the need t Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

What Are The Sign And Symptoms Of Diabetes?

What Are The Sign And Symptoms Of Diabetes?

Since diabetes mellitus--"sugar diabetes"--can initially be mild or severe, there can be a number of ways it can initially manifest. First and foremost, diabetes can initially be asymptomatic. In other words, without your doctor doing blood tests (or urine tests), you might not know you have the early stages of diabetes. And this would not be good. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can get treated, the better off you'll be. For severe diabetes--e.g. Type I diabetes, when your pancreas totally fails to make insulin--your blood sugar can get very high, you can experience polyuria (peeing a lot), increased thirst, and weight loss. You can also develop diabetic ketoacidosis, where the levels of ketone bodies in your blood are high enough that you have sweet, fruity breath (and perhaps go into a coma). And then you can manifest a variety of symptoms due to elevated blood sugar. One common symptom is troublesome yeast infections that just won't go away or are hard to cure. Another problem is milder polyuria and increased thirst. An interesting symptom my grandfather had--many years ago--was that they noticed ants trailing to his chamber pot (google it). His urine had so much sugar in it, the ants were attracted. Hope that's helpful. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Babies

Diabetes In Babies

What is diabetes in a baby? Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects the body’s ability to process blood sugar. There are two subtypes of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1, sometimes called juvenile diabetes, is the kind that affects babies and toddlers. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is not known, but it is believed that the body destroys the cells that normally make insulin, a hormone that keeps blood sugar levels in check. Because the body can’t make insulin (or adequate amounts of insulin), blood sugar levels can skyrocket, causing damage to the organs of the body — but only if left unchecked. If blood sugar levels are well-controlled, though, your child’s risk of organ damage is low. Today, type 1 diabetes is considered a manageable, chronic condition. “Having diabetes does not mean that your child can’t play sports or join any clubs or activities when she’s older. It doesn’t mean that she won’t be able to have babies,” says Natasha Burgert, MD, FAAP, pediatrician at Pediatric Associates in Kansas City, Missouri. “They can fully participate in all of the usual major life milestones.” What are the symptoms of diabetes in babies? Weight loss is often the first symptom of diabetes in young children. “Weight is a vital sign in infants, and kids who have type 1 diabetes will be eating regularly, perhaps even more than average, but will be unable to gain weight,” Burgert says. Unexplained vomiting may also be a symptom of diabetes. When a child’s blood sugar rises (because there’s not enough insulin in the body to keep it under control), she may throw up increasing amounts over a three- or four-day period for no apparent reason. If your child has been vomiting, but has no other symptoms of stomach illness, such as a fever or diarrh Continue reading >>

Why Do I Experience Tiredness And Fatigue After Eating?

Why Do I Experience Tiredness And Fatigue After Eating?

EDIT: My very first century upvote. Thank you ALL for your upvotes and encouragement! One word: insulin. Insulin is a kind of hormone produced by your body to keep your blood sugar level under control. Whenever you eat, your body starts digesting the food and releases tiny bouts of micronutrients (glucose, fatty acids or amino acids) into your blood stream. To counter this increase, your body triggers an insulin response to instruct the liver to absorb the extra amount of glucose to bring your blood sugar level to normal. As insulin is a hormone, it becomes tricky because different people react differently to hormones. Some people are very sensitive to a certain kind of hormone. Other people can be virtually immune to that kind of hormone. Same for insulin. In your case it sounds like your body is very sensitive to insulin. Either your body produces more insulin than normal, or your body reacts more sensitively to a given level of insulin. Either way, your liver would overwork to bring down your blood glucose level below normal in the short term, until it slowly recovers back to the normal level. This short term overshoot of blood glucose reduction causes fatigue and lethargy. See more: Sugar crash (Wikipedia)- A second possibility is that your diet is typically full of high GI food. GI stands for glycemic index which measures how much of insulin response a particular type of food triggers. The lower the GI, the less insulin required by your body to digest that food. Low GI food is typically slow-digesting food such as whole grain as opposed to refined grain, ie complex carb vs simple sugar. Vegetables are also low GI as it contains very few simple carbohydrates. In fact, most natural food tends to be complex and thus slower to digest and low GI; modern processed food t Continue reading >>

What Happens When Blood Sugar Drops?

What Happens When Blood Sugar Drops?

Glucose regulation in the body is complex with contributions from many different systems. These multiple controls are designed to keep a steady supply of glucose to the brain. Brain metabolism depends primarily on glucose for fuel. If the amount of glucose supplied by the blood falls, the brain is one of the first organs affected. There are a number of mechanisms that tightly regulate (outside of a disease state) the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood stream. When there is a plentiful supply of glucose (such as after a carbohydrate-containing meal), glucose is absorbed from the intestine, and the level of blood glucose (sugar) rises. Glucose is removed from the blood stream by uptake into virtually all cell types, but most importantly into muscle and adipose (fat) tissue. This removal requires insulin. Insulin, which is released from the pancreas, acts to decrease the level of glucose in the blood by signalling these cells to pick up and store glucose. Insulin also inhibits breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis) and formation of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources (gluconeogenesis). The central nervous system can also sense glucose levels and act to affect the blood sugar levels, at least in part by regulating gluconeogenesis. The importance of an adequate supply of glucose to the brain is apparent from the number of nervous, hormonal and metabolic responses to a falling glucose level (1). Most of these are defensive or adaptive, tending to raise the blood sugar via Glycogenolysis - breaking down of glycogen, a polymer of glucose molecules, stored in the liver and muscle. If the blood sugar level falls too low the liver converts a storage of glycogen into glucose and releases it into the bloodstream, to prevent the person going into a diabetic coma, for a short per Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms

Signs & Symptoms

There are many signs and symptoms that can indicate diabetes. Signs and symptoms can include the following: Unusual thirst Frequent urination Weight change (gain or loss) Extreme fatigue or lack of energy Blurred vision Frequent or recurring infections Cuts and bruises that are slow to heal Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet Trouble getting or maintaining an erection If you have any of these symptoms, it is important to contact your health-care provider right away. Even if you don’t have symptoms, if you are 40 or older, you should still get checked. It is important to recognize, however, that many people who have type 2 diabetes may display no symptoms. We respond to more than 20,000 requests per year by phone, email, and online chat. We are here to help give you the information and support you need so don't hesitate to contact us today. Contact Us Symptoms of diabetes in children Diabetes affects children of all ages. Most children who develop diabetes do not have a family history of diabetes. Symptoms of diabetes in your child could include: Drinking and going to the bathroom more frequently than usual Starting to wet the bed again Lack of energy If you think your child might have diabetes, see a doctor today. Diagnosis of diabetes Speak with your doctor and ask him or her to test you for diabetes using one of the following tests. The amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood is measured in mmol/L. Fasting blood glucose You must not eat or drink anything except water for at least eight hours before this test. A test result of 7.0 mmol/L or greater indicates diabetes. Random blood glucose This test may be done at any time, regardless of when you last ate. A test result of 11.0 mmol/L or greater, plus symptoms of diabetes, indicates diabetes. A1C This test may b Continue reading >>

Five Stages Of Diabetes: Pick Up High Insulin And Blood Sugar Levels Early

Five Stages Of Diabetes: Pick Up High Insulin And Blood Sugar Levels Early

FIVE STAGES OF DIABETES: BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS & INSULIN DYSFUNCTION Did you know there are 5 stages of blood sugar and insulin dysfunction leading to full blown diabetes, Most, walk around without knowing their blood sugar levels are high. Upon the diagnosis of diabetes there is a typical sense of shock or disbelief, yet at the same time it represents an estimated 13 year losing battle for the pancreas as food choice triggers excess insulin release and the pancreas loses function. Prevention and intervention should focus on stage 1, the earliest point of dysfunction which is insulin resistance. Unfortunately because clinicians focus on blood sugar and not insulin as a standard test, years are lost and treatment typically begins at stage 3 when high blood sugar levels are present. The Stages of Diabetes Stage 1, insulin resistance: Blood sugar levels seem normal because the pancreas balances high blood sugar by releasing higher amounts of insulin. Stage 2, blood sugar levels rise (pre-diabetes): The pancreas has difficulty keeping up with the demand of producing more insulin to maintain normal levels of blood sugar. The pancreas becomes fatigued from overworking and it puts out less insulin, blood sugar levels begin to rise. Stage 3, high blood sugar levels (diabetes): Damage to the pancreas begins, insulin output cannot cover the rise in blood sugar levels rise more quickly. Stage 4, damage to the pancreas (diabetes): An elevation in blood sugar level is the result of years of the pancreas overworking. The pancreas works excessively to lower blood sugar. Stage 5, Failed pancreas (diabetes): The pancreas produces too little insulin, or none . Need insulin injections to survive. Early DETECTION: Before Blood Sugar Levels Rise There may not be any symptoms, or symptoms may n Continue reading >>

Diabetic Attack Symptoms

Diabetic Attack Symptoms

A person with diabetes may experience blood sugar that is too low, known as hypoglycemia, or blood sugar that is too high, known as hyperglycemia. Diabetes is a disease in which the body is not able to properly use insulin, a hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar. Blood sugar fuels the body, and an imbalance of blood sugar and insulin may lead to health complications. A person experiencing a diabetes attack may have a variety of symptoms. Video of the Day Mental changes are the first symptoms of blood sugar imbalance. Mental changes happen quickly and can progressively worsen with delayed treatment. Blood sugar that is too low or too high can trigger confusion and problems with memory. A person may seem unusually confused and have trouble recalling recent events or personal information. As blood sugar imbalance worsens, additional physical symptoms may appear while mental changes get worse. Dizziness may also occur, along with feeling weak. Without treatment, a diabetic may lapse into unconsciousness. He may be difficult or impossible to rouse or engage, and immediate medical attention is needed to prevent further complications. Thirst and Hunger High or low blood sugar changes how the body utilizes food for fuel. During high blood sugar states, the body pulls fluid from the cells, leaving tissues without proper hydration. A person with high blood sugar may experience increased thirst in response. Urination may also increase. Left untreated, high blood sugar can progress into ketoacidosis, a potentially life-threatening condition. Low blood sugar triggers the body to crave additional food for fuel, resulting in increased hunger. MedlinePlus suggests that eating foods with about 15 g of carbohydrates can help prevent even lower blood sugar until medical help can Continue reading >>

Diabetes Signs

Diabetes Signs

The symptoms of diabetes can be reduced to three major factors. In the case of type 1 diabetes, these symptoms can develop quickly. However, when it comes to type 2 diabetes, symptoms may be far subtler and develop slower. What are the big three symptoms of diabetes? The three major symptoms of diabetes are: Polyuria - the need to urinate frequently Polydipsia - increased thirst & fluid intake Polyphagia - increased appetite It is common for a number of symptoms to appear together. For example, increased thirst (polydipsia) and an increased need to urinate (polyuria) will often come as a pair. Are there other symptoms of diabetes? The 3Ps of diabetes are a good indication that blood glucose levels may be too high. However, these symptoms may not always be obvious and it’s important to be aware of the other symptoms which may also be presented. In children and young adults, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes (including the 3Ps) develop more quickly. In type 2 diabetes, symptoms of diabetes may appear gradually, sometimes over a period of years, and may become more noticeable on some days and less noticeable on other days. What happens when a person develops diabetes? The 3Ps of diabetes are caused by the effect of diabetes on the body. If the level of glucose in the blood becomes too high, excess glucose is removed from the blood by the kidneys and excreted via the urine (glycosuria). This results in greater urine production and causes the patient to urinate frequently. Water held in the cells is required to replace lost blood volume, and thus causes dehydration and thirst. Increased hunger develops if the body has difficulty getting glucose from the blood into cells. This can occur if the body has insufficient insulin or if the body cannot respond to its insulin sufficie Continue reading >>

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