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Weed Lowers Blood Sugar

Can A Diabetic Smoke Marijuana?

Can A Diabetic Smoke Marijuana?

I love California. This November, Californians will have the opportunity to vote on a measure that would legalize marijuana use and sale in the state. Adults over the age of 21 would be allowed to carry up to an ounce of marijuana, and they would be allowed to cultivate for personal usage up to 25 square feet of cannabis plants. As of April 2009, 56% of Californians surveyed supported the legalization and taxation of pot. Let me be clear: I like this idea because I think it’s silly to have so much of our criminal justice system tied up with drug charges, and because I giggle at the absurdity of the fact that our state government is essentially saying, “Well, if you can’t beat ’em…” In other words, my reasons for liking this proposal, and for liking California, have nothing to do with the drug itself. In fact, pot itself is a big open question for me– namely: Can a diabetic smoke pot? I don’t mean “can” here as a verb of possibility or survivability. What I mean is– is it a good idea for a type 1 diabetic to smoke pot? How does marijuana affect blood sugar control and management, in terms of both behavior and biology? Lacking any personal experience in the matter, I first turn to the internet to answer these questions. The first thing I note: many other people are wondering the same thing. Rarely does Google pre-fill queries I have about diabetes, but this one Google is all over: “marijuana and diabetes,” “marijuana diabetes type 1,” “marijuana diabetes type 2,” “marijuana diabetes treatment,” and so on. The results of these queries are full of accounts from people with the personal experience I don’t have. There are apparently many message boards, either diabetes-focused or pot-focused, that have touched on the question of whether Continue reading >>

Metabolic Effects Of Chronic Cannabis Smoking

Metabolic Effects Of Chronic Cannabis Smoking

OBJECTIVE We examined if chronic cannabis smoking is associated with hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, reduced β-cell function, or dyslipidemia in healthy individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a cross-sectional, case-control study, we studied cannabis smokers (n = 30; women, 12; men, 18; 27 ± 8 years) and control subjects (n = 30) matched for age, sex, ethnicity, and BMI (27 ± 6). Abdominal fat depots and intrahepatic fat content were quantified by magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Insulin-sensitivity indices and various aspects of β-cell function were derived from oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). RESULTS Self-reported cannabis use was: 9.5 (2–38) years; joints/day: 6 (3–30) [median (range)]. Carbohydrate intake and percent calories from carbohydrates, but not total energy intake, were significantly higher in cannabis smokers. There were no group differences in percent total body fat, or hepatic fat, but cannabis smokers had a higher percent abdominal visceral fat (18 ± 9 vs. 12 ± 5%; P = 0.004). Cannabis smokers had lower plasma HDL cholesterol (49 ± 14 vs. 55 ± 13 mg/dL; P = 0.02), but fasting levels of glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or free fatty acids (FFA) were not different. Adipocyte insulin resistance index and percent FFA suppression during an OGTT was lower (P < 0.05) in cannabis smokers. However, oral glucose insulin sensitivity index, measures of β-cell function, or incretin concentrations did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS Chronic cannabis smoking was associated with visceral adiposity and adipose tissue insulin resistance but not with hepatic steatosis, insulin insensitivity, impaired pancreatic β-cell function, or glucose intol Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Can I Use Marijuana To Lower My Blood Sugar

Asknadia: Can I Use Marijuana To Lower My Blood Sugar

Dear Nadia, Is marijuana used to lower high blood sugar? if so, does this mean I have to refrain from the munchies to get the benefits? Leah Dear Leah: The new Marijuana industry is still at its infancy in terms of its medicinal applications. Institutional investors are flocking at financial conferences to see how they can benefit from investing in this up and coming industry. There is some research that demonstrates, Marijuana, also known as Cannabis Sativa, does have some medicinal properties for people living diabetes. The American Journal of Medicine reports on a study by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which was conducted with 4,657 women and men from 2005 to 2010. The results concluded that people with diabetes experienced less insulin resistance and lower blood sugar readings. The results are considered statistically significant. The Munchies and THC A group of neuroscientists at the University of Bordeaux, conducted a study with mice and found that the THC in marijuana is what enhances the mice’s brain to smell food creating a desire to eat more. This occurs through the receptors of the brain, where the dopamine and ghrelin receptors, regulate the pathways for mood, feeling of joy, pain and hunger. There are different marijuana strains that have higher cannabinoids and less THC. The assumption is less THC will not stimulate the ghrelin receptors, thereby reducing the desire to eat. Some people that take insulin experience stomach issues and are unable to eat. They welcome the munchies because it allows them to have some appetite. To avoid drug interactions, it’s extremely important to tell your healthcare professional if you have decided to add Cannabis in your therapy mix. You might be interested in reading these articles that were wri Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Marijuana Use On Glucose, Insulin, And Insulin Resistance Among Us Adults.

The Impact Of Marijuana Use On Glucose, Insulin, And Insulin Resistance Among Us Adults.

Abstract BACKGROUND: There are limited data regarding the relationship between cannabinoids and metabolic processes. Epidemiologic studies have found lower prevalence rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus in marijuana users compared with people who have never used marijuana, suggesting a relationship between cannabinoids and peripheral metabolic processes. To date, no study has investigated the relationship between marijuana use and fasting insulin, glucose, and insulin resistance. METHODS: We included 4657 adult men and women from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2005 to 2010. Marijuana use was assessed by self-report in a private room. Fasting insulin and glucose were measured via blood samples after a 9-hour fast, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated to evaluate insulin resistance. Associations were estimated using multiple linear regression, accounting for survey design and adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: Of the participants in our study sample, 579 were current marijuana users and 1975 were past users. In multivariable adjusted models, current marijuana use was associated with 16% lower fasting insulin levels (95% confidence interval [CI], -26, -6) and 17% lower HOMA-IR (95% CI, -27, -6). We found significant associations between marijuana use and smaller waist circumferences. Among current users, we found no significant dose-response. CONCLUSIONS: We found that marijuana use was associated with lower levels of fasting insulin and HOMA-IR, and smaller waist circumference. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Cannabis And Diabetes

Cannabis And Diabetes

Tweet Cannabis, or marijuana, is a drug derived from the cannabis plant that is used for recreational use, medicinal purposes and religious or spiritual rites. Cannabis plants produce a unique family of compounds called cannabinoids. Of these, the major psychoactive (brain function-affecting) compound is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Marijuana contains high levels of THC, as well as other psychoactive chemicals, which produce the 'high' users feel when inhaling or ingesting it. History of cannabis Cannabis has been used by humans for thousands of years, with the earliest record of its use dating back to the 3rd millennium BC. It is indigenous to Central and South Asia, and is believed to of been used by many ancient civilizations, particularly as a form of medicine or herbal therapy. Cannabis drug class Laws regarding the production, possession, use and sale of cannabis came into effect in the early 20th century. But despite being illegal in most countries, including the UK, its use as a recreational drug is still very common. In fact it is the most used illicit drug in the world, according to the United Nations, with approximately 22.5 million adults across the globe estimated to use marijuana on a daily basis. Legal status In the UK, cannabis is categorized as a Class B drug under the UK Misuse of Drugs Act. Individuals caught in possession of these drugs are therefore given more lenient punishment - often confiscation and a 'cannabis warning' for small amounts. Effects of cannabis Cannabis causes a number of noticeable but mild (in comparison with other recreational drugs) physical and mental effects. These include: Increased pulse rate Increased appetite Bloodshot eyes Light-headiness Occasional dizzy spells Problems with memory, concentration, perception and coordina Continue reading >>

Can Marijuana Improve Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Marijuana Improve Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes?

Doctors visits, blood tests and more medications. This is the norm when you’re living with type 2 diabetes. Life becomes a new routine of pricking your finger, worrying if the food you ate is going to spike your sugars and becoming nervous at every little tingle in your fingers and toes. You have to deal with conflicting advice about what you should and shouldn’t eat (hint: diabetic foods are definitely not a good choice). Is it any wonder that there is a higher risk of depression for type 2 diabetics. What if there was a natural solution that might help your mood and your blood sugar control? What are Cannabinoids? This plant goes by so many names, marijuana, maryjane, weed and is the most widely used illicit drug worldwide. What you might not know is that cannabis has a wide range of medicinal benefits. To understand the medicinal uses of cannabis we first need to look at how it works in the body. Our body has it’s own cannabinoid receptors, called the Endocannabinoid system. The system helps regulate a number of processes including appetite, memory, mood, pain, metabolism, blood flow and cell immunity. The active ingredients in cannabis are called cannabinoids, they can act on the endocannabinoid system which is where the medical benefits come from. Cannabis contains around 80 different cannabinoids most of which have not been widely researched as yet. The most well known cannabinoid contained in cannabis is THC. Cannabis: the old kid on the block Actually, humans have been cultivating and using hemp (the plant the cannabis comes from) for over 10,000 years. Evidence shows it is the first agricultural crop our ancestors farmed. Cannabis has also been used medicinally for nearly as long, with Queen Victoria using it regularly. It is the THC component of cannabis Continue reading >>

Marijuana Use Linked To Prediabetes

Marijuana Use Linked To Prediabetes

Does cannabis protect against blood sugar problems…or ignite them? Several big population studies hint at an intriguing association between marijuana and lower risk for type 2 diabetes. But a recent University of Minnesota study has uncovered 49-65% higher odds for prediabetes in current smokers and former “heavy” users. The study was published in the September issue of the journal Diabetologia. Researchers used data from the large, on-going CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study, which is studying heart disease development in 5,115 black and Caucasian women and men over several decades. For this study, they looked at associations between marijuana use and blood-sugar levels in a group of 3,034 study volunteers 25 years after the study began in the mid-1980s. They also looked at 3,151 volunteers who did not have prediabetes or diabetes in 1992-1993 to see, in follow-up exams, how blood sugar levels changed for pot users and abstainers. Overall, marijuana use dropped from 28% at the start of the study to 12% by 2010. By then, current smokers had a 65% higher risk for prediabetes. And former users who smoked or otherwise ingested marijuana at least 100 times in the past had a 49% higher risk for prediabetes. But pot wasn’t associated with higher risk for full-blown type 2 diabetes. “Marijuana may have a more noticeable impact on glycemic metabolism in the prediabetes range compared with the diabetes range,” says lead researcher Michael Bancks, a doctoral student at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. In contrast, traditional risk factors like obesity may overshadow the effects of marijuana in people who do develop diabetes, he adds. THC and A1c Nearly 19 million Americans use marijuana. But “despite the growing movem Continue reading >>

Marijuana Use May Raise Risk Of Developing High Blood Sugar

Marijuana Use May Raise Risk Of Developing High Blood Sugar

MORE Marijuana may raise people's risk of developing prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are abnormally high but not high enough to warrant a diagnosis with type 2 diabetes, a new study finds. In the study, researchers found that people who used large amounts of marijuana during young adulthood were 40 percent more likely to develop prediabetes as middle-age adults than those who had never tried the drug. However, marijuana use was not linked to an increased risk of having type 2 diabetes, according to the study, published today (Sept. 13) in the journal Diabetologia. [Marijuana vs. Alcohol: Which Is Worse for Your Health?] Previous studies looking at marijuana use had found that users have lower rates of diabetes compared with nonusers, said Michael Bancks, a Ph.D. student at the University of Minnesota and lead author of the study. But in those studies, both marijuana use and diabetes were assessed at the time, meaning it was unclear whether people were using the drug before they developed diabetes, or afterward, he said. "We felt we could address the potential limitations of previous research and add new information to our understanding of the relationship between marijuana use and subsequent metabolic health," Bancks told Live Science. Diabetes is a metabolic condition. The results of the new study, however, contradict the results of previous studies that found that using marijuana may reduce the risk of developing diabetes, he said. In addition, "it's unclear how marijuana use could place an individual at increased risk for prediabetes, yet not diabetes," the researchers wrote. The researchers offered several reasons to explain this observation. For one, it's possible that people who were more likely to develop diabetes were left out of the study, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Marijuana: A Possible Treatment?

Diabetes And Marijuana: A Possible Treatment?

Marijuana is currently legal for medical use in 28 American states and the District of Columbia. There are increasing evidence to support the claims that the Cannabis plant offers many potential medicinal properties for a wide number of diseases and disorders. Although we know that marijuana can be helpful in treating nervous disorders, little research is available on its other healing properties because of the law against using the herb for medicinal use. Because of the regulations and the stigma against marijuana, the opinions are biased. But the early research looks promising between the relationship between marijuana and the metabolic processes of the body is still in a relatively new research phase. Of the many research done on various health problems, one of the newest claims is that marijuana can help prevent diabetes, help treat diabetes, and treat certain complications as a result of diabetes. To clear the stigma about marijuana, this article will cover these following topics: What is Marijuana Marijuana has numerous of nicknames throughout the years. Amongst all the names, it is most commonly known as weed, pot, ganja, Mary Jane, hemp, and Cannabis. It is actually the female flower buds of the plant Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, or a hybrid of both strains (the male flower buds have very minimal psychedelic chemicals if not none). Of the 483 known compounds in the plant, there are 86 canninoid chemicals identified. Of the 86 chemicals, the main psychoactive pharmacological chemical is called tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Other cannabinoid chemicals found are cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), cannabaravin (THCV), cannabichromene (CBC), cannabigerol (CBG), and cannbicyclol (CBL). All these cannabinoid chemicals are known to also have psychoactive and pharma Continue reading >>

Cannabis Use Associated With Lower Blood Sugar

Cannabis Use Associated With Lower Blood Sugar

A new study published in the American Journal of Medicine has revealed a potential benefit from the use of cannabis. The article, entitled “The Impact of Marijuana Use on Glucose, Insulin, and Insulin Resistance among U.S. Adults,” investigated the blood sugar-related effects of cannabis use among participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2005 to 2010. In several other studies of large populations, lower rates of both obesity and diabetes have been noted among users of cannabis, as compared with non-users. This curious fact encouraged the three primary authors of the study to examine cannabis use among the 4657 participants in the national survey. The researchers noted that although cannabis smokers generally consume more calories than non-users, they paradoxically live with lower body mass indexes (BMIs) and reduced rates of both obesity and diabetes. Of the participants in the national survey, 579 were currently using cannabis and 1975 had previously used cannabis. To assess blood glucose, insulin resistance and other factors among cannabis users, the authors organized survey participants into three groups – those who had never used cannabis, those who had used cannabis but not within 30 days, and those who were current users. The authors put study participants through tests for fasting blood sugar levels, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) testing, and assessments of blood pressure, BMI and waist circumference. The researchers found that subjects who were current cannabis users had lower levels of fasting insulin, lower levels of insulin resistance, smaller waist circumference, and higher levels of HDL cholesterol, which is known to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. This supported findings from earlier studies Continue reading >>

Marijuana And Type 1 Diabetes

Marijuana And Type 1 Diabetes

Warning: Content within discusses drugs that are illegal in some jurisdictions. Beyond Type 1 in no way encourages illegal activity and would like to remind its readers that marijuana usage continues to be an offense under US federal law. From Cheech and Chong to Nancy Botwin on Weeds, marijuana has had its share of the spotlight over the years. Legislative consensus is “half baked” with 28 states having legalized medical marijuana (eight of which legalized it for recreational purposes, ages 21+). That means in more than half the states in the US, you can use pot medicinally. Legal or not, depending on where you live and what your ailment or aim is, it doesn’t mean “everybody must get stoned.” It does mean though, if you’re going to “puff the magic dragon,” you should know a few things first. Like dude…what about marijuana and Type 1 diabetes? These are the must-knows and things to consider when it comes to ganja. What’s the law? Find out where it’s legal in the US according to CNN. What are the side effects of marijuana? Like any other drug, marijuana is a mind-altering substance, which is to say, you act, think or feel differently on it. THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is the chemical known to cause marijuana’s psychological effects. Some report feeling no effect, but this is uncommon. Different stains (types) of marijuana and different ways in which to consume it can also produce varying effects. While your reaction is individual, you should know the wide range of side effects that you could experience when under the influence of marijuana. You could feel… relaxed euphoric sleepy talkative anxious paranoid thirsty hungry What are the long-term effects of marijuana? Because marijuana is not legal under federal law in the US and in other parts o Continue reading >>

Marijuana And Diabetes: Benefits, Disadvantages, And Legality

Marijuana And Diabetes: Benefits, Disadvantages, And Legality

Marijuana has been used medicinally for thousands of years, although many people use it as a recreational drug too. Research now indicates marijuana may have medicinal properties that can provide benefits for diabetes, as well as other health conditions. After alcohol, marijuana (also known as cannabis) is the most commonly used drug in the world. The United Nations World Drug Report 2016 estimate there are 182.5 million users globally. This article explores the medicinal properties of marijuana and how its use might benefit people with diabetes. It also examines the potential downsides of using marijuana for people who have diabetes and what the legal status of the drug is. Contents of this article: Medicinal properties of marijuana Compounds in marijuana are believed to be responsible for the health benefits associated with the plant. These are called cannabinoids. Cannabinoids interact with receptors found in the central nervous system of the body. This can affect a number of processes such as: mood pain memory coordination appetite Of all the cannabinoids in marijuana, THC and cannabidiol (CBD) are the most commonly studied. THC is the main psychoactive component in cannabis, producing the "high" associated with the drug. CBD is not considered psychoactive, but has a number of medicinal uses. As such, it is of interest to those considering marijuana for medical use. Medical marijuana and synthetic drugs The term "medical marijuana" means the use of the whole, unprocessed cannabis plant (or extracts from it) to treat certain health conditions. It should be noted that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved marijuana as a safe and effective drug for any condition. The FDA has, however, approved the following medications containing synthetic versio Continue reading >>

Top 5 Benefits Of Cannabis For Diabetes

Top 5 Benefits Of Cannabis For Diabetes

Diabetes is the term for a group of related metabolic disorders characterized by prolonged high blood glucose levels. Diabetes affects almost 400 million people worldwide, resulting in up to five million deaths per year--and its prevalence is rising. Substantial evidence indicates that cannabis may prevent and treat the disease. Diabetes is the term for a group of related metabolic disorders characterized by prolonged high blood glucose levels. Diabetes affects almost 400 million people worldwide, resulting in up to five million deaths per year–and its prevalence is rising. Substantial evidence indicates that cannabis may prevent and treat the disease. Preventative Diabetes is associated with high levels of fasting insulin and insulin resistance, as well as low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). In 2013, the results of a five-year study into the effects of cannabis on fasting insulin and insulin resistance were published in the American Journal of Medicine. Of the 4,657 respondents, 2,554 had used cannabis in their lifetime (579 were current users and 1,975 were past users) and 2,103 had never used the drug. The researchers found that current users of cannabis had 16% lower fasting insulin levels than respondents who had never used cannabis, as well as having 17% lower levels of insulin resistance and higher levels of HDL-C. Respondents who had used cannabis in their lifetime but were not current users showed similar but less pronounced associations, indicating that the protective effect of cannabis fades with time. The researchers also ran analyses on the data that excluded individuals diagnosed with diabetes. Even after excluding diabetics, current cannabis users were found to exhibit reduced fasting insulin and insulin resistance levels, indica Continue reading >>

Marijuana Decreases Insulin Resistance, Improves Blood Sugar Control

Marijuana Decreases Insulin Resistance, Improves Blood Sugar Control

Epidemiologists at the Harvard School of Public Health, the University of Nebraska College of Medicine, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have discovered something surprising about the metabolic effects of Cannabis sativa, better known as marijuana. A drug notorious for giving users the munchies can in fact help moderate blood sugar levels, waist size, and body mass index (BMI). Their novel study, published in the current issue of The American Journal of Medicine, lays the groundwork for further investigation. "Previous epidemiologic studies have found lower prevalence rates of obesity and diabetes in marijuana users,” said lead investigator Murray Mittleman, M.D., in a press release. “Ours is the first study to investigate the relationship between marijuana use and fasting insulin, glucose, and insulin resistance.” Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) collected between 2005 and 2010, the researchers found a significant link between the regular use of marijuana and better blood sugar control. In their analysis, participants who reported using marijuana in the past month had: 16 percent lower fasting insulin levels 17 percent lower levels of insulin resistance higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) smaller waist circumference The study incorporated data from 4,657 patients who completed a drug-use questionnaire, took a physical exam, and provided a blood sample following a nine-hour fast. Of these, 579 were current marijuana users, 1,975 had used it in the past, and 2,103 had never used marijuana. Both insulin resistance and a large waist circumference have been linked to a greater risk of developing diabetes. The fasting insulin test used in this study is a common way to diagnose diabetes. Mari Continue reading >>

How To Stay Safe As An Inexperienced Stoner

How To Stay Safe As An Inexperienced Stoner

If you are new to consuming cannabis, there are certain key facts that will serve you well to remember. Certain pre-existing health conditions are known to be affected by cannabis in various ways: these include epilepsy, hypertension, migraine, schizophrenia and many more. If you are new to consuming cannabis, there are certain key facts that will serve you well to remember. Certain pre-existing health conditions are known to be affected by cannabis in various ways: these include epilepsy, hypertension, migraine, schizophrenia and many more. The medical community is rapidly acquiring new information about how these relationships occur, and consensus has still not been reached in many cases. How dose and cannabinoid ratio can alter the effect of cannabis For many conditions, use of cannabis or extracted cannabinoids can greatly benefit the sufferer. However, there is much evidence to suggest that dosage and cannabinoid ratio are of the utmost importance when it comes to self-medication, and that the chosen method of consumption may also make a difference to derived benefits. For example, it has been suggested that THC in low doses is a highly effective treatment for depression, whereas in high doses the benefit can be negated and depression can in fact be exacerbated. A dose-dependent effect has been proposed for various other illnesses including schizophrenia, arthritis (and other inflammatory diseases), and hypertension—not just in response to THC but also to cannabidiol (CBD), another cannabinoid of huge medical significance. It is certainly advisable for those suffering from these illnesses (or indeed any chronic condition) to consult medical professionals prior to use of cannabis, either medicinally or recreationally. However, even if no pre-existing condition is Continue reading >>

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