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Ways To Check Blood Sugar Without Pricking

Fda Approves 1st Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves 1st Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Federal regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn't need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The discomfort of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies can discourage people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar. Abbott's new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. The Food and Drug Administration approved the device Wednesday. Abbott isn't disclosing the price for the reader or the sensors, which should be available in pharmacies within months. Continue reading >>

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Level

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Level

What tests can I use to check my blood sugar level? There are 2 blood tests that can help you manage your diabetes. One of these tests is called an A1C test, which reflects your blood sugar (or blood glucose) control over the past 2-3 months. Testing your A1C level every 3 months is the best way for you and your doctor to understand how well your blood sugar levels are controlled. Your A1C goal will be determined by your doctor, but it is generally less than 7%. The other test is called SMBG, or self-monitoring of blood glucose. Using a blood glucose monitor to do SMBG testing can help you improve control of your blood sugar levels. The results you get from an SMBG test can help you make appropriate adjustments to your medicine, diet and/or level of physical activity. Every person who has diabetes should have a blood glucose monitor (also called a home blood sugar meter, a glucometer, or a glucose meter) and know how to use it. Your doctor may prescribe a blood glucose monitor. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved meters that work without pricking your finger. But these meters cannot replace regular glucose meters. They are used to get additional readings between regular testing. What supplies do I need? You will need a glucose meter, alcohol pads, sterile finger lancets and sterile test strips. Check with your health insurance plan to see if they will pay for these supplies. How do I pick a glucose meter? Check with your health insurance plan to see if they will pay for your glucose meter. If so, your plan may only pay for a certain meter. If your insurance plan doesn’t pay for glucose meters, ask your doctor which meters he or she recommends. Shop around and compare costs. Consider what features are important to you. For example, some meters are Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

U.S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn’t need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott’s new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. But most don’t do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. “We’re able to lower blood sugar safely” with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott’s device was approved for adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and should be available in pharmacies within months. The company, based near Chicago, did not disclose the price of the reader or the sensors. Abbott’s system can’t be used with an insulin pump, a device worn a Continue reading >>

Device To Keep Tabs On Blood Sugar Levels Without Finger-pricking Available In Singapore

Device To Keep Tabs On Blood Sugar Levels Without Finger-pricking Available In Singapore

SINGAPORE: When Mr Kevin Lim was diagnosed with diabetes in June last year, the 40-year-old wanted to do all he could to improve his condition. The first step would be to start monitoring his blood glucose levels so he could get a better sense of the severity of his diabetes. With that, however, he faced the inevitable task of pricking his finger almost daily - or so he thought. Through some research, Mr Lim, who works in an innovation lab, discovered a flash glucose monitoring device online that he could buy and use at home that could do away with the need for pricking his fingers. Self-monitoring for diabetes patients typically involves pricking the finger for a drop of blood that has to be transferred onto a test strip and read with a small machine. The flash glucose monitoring device measures the glucose level of tissue fluid through a sensor about the size of an old Singapore 50-cent coin. The sensor is attached to the back of the upper arm by painless self-insertion and an adhesive pad. Readings are made by scanning the sensor with a separate machine. The sensor that can be worn for up to two weeks and holds eight hours of 15-minute glucose readings at any time is water-resistant. Mr Lim ordered it on eBay, but the device, that for a few years has been available in the US and Europe, landed in Singapore in May this year. Advertisement With the device, Mr Lim has been able to observe which foods cause his blood glucose level to spike, which activities help him to maintain a healthy blood sugar level, and whether the medication he was prescribed were effective. In diabetic patients, high blood glucose levels after a meal has been linked to heart disease. The monitoring being more discreet than finger-pricking is something Mr Lim appreciates. “It’s demoralising t Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Device Could End Finger Pricking For Blood Testing

New Diabetes Device Could End Finger Pricking For Blood Testing

New technology could mean that people with may no longer need to prick their fingers when testing their levels. An engineering breakthrough from the University of Leeds has led to the development of a small that uses low-powered lasers to . The device does not penetrate the skin - which is something people with diabetes currently have to do multiple times a day - and could provide a painless . A nano-engineered silica glass enables the measurement of through a fluorescence generated by the lasers. This process takes less than 30 seconds. The device can , which means development as a wearable device might not be far away. The designers hope that once further trials have been completed, and the device is put on the market, it could be available in portable and wearable forms. Speaking about the device's capabilities, Professor Gin Jose, University of Leeds, added: "This will allow people to self-regulate and minimise emergency hospital treatment. "This wearable device would then be just one step from a product which sends alerts to or readings directly to doctors, allowing them to profile how a person is over time." Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of d Continue reading >>

Test Your Glucose Level Without Drawing Blood

Test Your Glucose Level Without Drawing Blood

People with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance are advised to spot-check their blood-glucose levels several times daily to reduce the risk of serious complications. That’s a lot of finger-pricking, considering that about 700 million people fall into one of those categories. The Israeli company Integrity Applications put more than a decade into developing GlucoTrack, described as the first truly noninvasive system for self-monitoring glucose levels. Instead of drawing blood, you clip the GlucoTrack sensor to your earlobe. A patented combination of ultrasonic, electromagnetic and thermal technologies works with a proprietary algorithm to measure physiological parameters correlated with glucose level. Results are displayed within about a minute on a USB-connected handheld control unit, which also stores and compares previous readings. The number is announced verbally, facilitating use by elderly and vision-impaired people with diabetes or pre-diabetes. Sales in parts of Europe, South America, Australia and New Zealand began in 2016, after the newest version of the device won regulatory approval in Europe and in South Korea. Integrity is soon beginning clinical trials of GlucoTrack Model DF-F in the United States required for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, and is working toward approval in China. The “DF” stands for David Freger, the late Israeli physicist who envisioned a novel noninvasive glucose monitor. His colleagues Avner Gal and David Malka helped him turn it into reality. “David passed away from diabetes complications at age 48 in 2004, and we called our device models DF to memorialize him,” Gal tells ISRAEL21c. Three technologies The trio’s research revealed several attempts to invent a noninvasive blood-glucose monitor using optic Continue reading >>

Stick-on Tattoo Measures Blood Sugar Without Needles

Stick-on Tattoo Measures Blood Sugar Without Needles

Diabetics often prick their fingers up to eight times a day to check their blood sugar. Researchers have long looked for a solution that provides constant monitoring without being so invasive, and researchers at the University of California San Diego have come up with a new needle-free design that could turn out to be less painful, yet just as effective, as the finger-prick method. The UCSD team printed electrodes onto standard temporary tattoo paper and paired it with a sensor. After each meal, the electrodes generate a current for about 10 minutes. The current draws the glucose—a type of sugar that diabetics have trouble breaking down—up near the skin's surface, allowing the device to read the glucose levels. The glucose is carried by sodium ions, which have a positive charge. By measuring how strong the charge is just under the skin, the sensor estimates how much glucose is in the bloodstream. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done The researchers tested the device on seven non-diabetic people and found that the tattoo’s glucose measurements were consistent with the traditional finger-prick testing method. Amay Bandodkar, a nanoengineering graduate student at UCSD, who worked on the study, sa Continue reading >>

8 Tips To Reduce Finger Prick Pain

8 Tips To Reduce Finger Prick Pain

Managing diabetes can be a pain — literally. And the more blood sugar testing you do, the more of a pain it is, confirms Sacha Uelmen, RDN, CDE, director of nutrition for the American Diabetes Association. Still, monitoring blood sugar levels is a critical component of good diabetes management — research involving more than 5,000 people with diabetes has shown that those who test blood sugar regularly have better blood sugar control than those who rely solely on diabetes medication. Fortunately, there are a number of ways to lessen the pain that comes along with that testing. So if finger pricks make you feel like a voodoo doll, here are eight strategies to try: 1. Test on the Side of Your Finger When doing diabetes blood sugar testing, resist aiming straight for all that real estate on the tip of your finger — that’s definitely painful. “When testing on your finger, use only the sides of your finger, where there’s better blood flow, and not the pad of the finger," says Hector Verastigui, RN, CDE, clinical research coordinator at the Texas Diabetes Institute in San Antonio. "Testing on the pad of the finger is more painful.” 2. Warm Up Your Hands Testing when your hands are cold can be more painful than when they're warmer. To heat up your fingers, just sit on them briefly, rub them together, or give them a good scrub using warm water and soap. “This will get the blood flow going,” says Verastigui. When getting that all-important drop of blood is less painful, managing diabetes is easier. 3. Adjust the Lancet Depth If blood sugar testing is always painful for you, it’s possible that your lancet is set to hit too hard or too deep. Part of managing diabetes includes adjusting the depth and force of the lancet properly. If you’re having trouble figuri Continue reading >>

Glucose Testing Via Earlobe, Not Stressful Fingersticks

Glucose Testing Via Earlobe, Not Stressful Fingersticks

Ah, non-invasive glucose testing. It's the dreamed-about Holy Grail of Diabetes, something we know could someday exist but seems to remain just beyond reach. There have been oodles of attempts at non-invasive approaches through the years -- everything from the failed GlucoWatch concept to more recent designs promising glucose readings through tattoos, tears, sweat, saliva, fingerprint and eyeball scans, and even contact lenses. Now there's another one on the scene, Folks. This one is called GlucoTrack, and it offers us the ability to test our blood sugars without hav ing to poke our fingers or draw any blood. All we need to do is put a clip on our earlobe. Well, this isn't actually new; the product's been in development by Israeli company Integrity Applications for the better part of a decade now, and you may remember our coverage of this very device back in 2009, and other coverage going back to 2006 about GlucoTrack "coming soon." As with most of these non-invasive prototypes, approval was expected to be right around the corner... but that didn't materialize. Flash forward to Summer 2013, and GlucoTrack finally secured CE Mark approval to sell in Europe, and now hopes to submit the device to U.S. regulators as soon as possible -- with a plan to conduct clinical studies here sometime this year. The GlucoTrack DF-F model is a high-tech earlobe clip that measures glucose using three kinds of technologies: ultrasound, electromagnetic, and thermal. You just clip the GlucoTrack sensor onto your earlobe and within a minute, it sends your BG data through a headphone-style cord to a smartphone-sized handheld controller. And that's where the glucose reading is displayed or even verbally announced. Integrity Applications points to clinical data collected since 2009 at the Soroka Continue reading >>

How To Check Blood Glucose Without Needles

How To Check Blood Glucose Without Needles

If you ask people with diabetes what they dislike most about their disease, often the answer will be having to prick their finger to monitor their blood glucose levels. According to the US National Library of Medicine, "Regularly checking your blood sugar level is one of the most important steps you can take in managing the disease. It provides your doctor with important information regarding the control of your blood sugar." Fortunately, other ways to check your blood sugar levels are appearing on the market. Check for current advances in monitoring devices. Currently, there are a few out on the market--infrared light monitor, skin testing and continuous glucose testing. The first one measures your glucose levels by penetrating your skin with a light, the second is like a watch with a special sensor pad, and the third uses a sensory pad placed under your skin. Both sensory pads will sound an alarm to alert you to your glucose levels. Consider disadvantages. You may not get accurate reading with the infrared light due to fluctuations such as body temperature and blood pressure. The watch may irritate your skin and does not work when you sweat. The third option costs between $1,00 and $2,000 and you need to move it periodically. None of the options are as accurate as the traditional way. Test run all to see which one works best for you. Maybe use two of them to ensure a more accurate reading. Try other skin sites with needles if none of the non-invasive products work for you. While you still will need to use a needle to reach the blood in your arm, abdomen or thigh, it will not be as painful as when you stick your finger tip. Most up-to-date monitors allow use of alternative test sites. If you have an older meter, you may have to upgrade. Julia Derek is a certified Manha Continue reading >>

No More Finger Pricks For Some With Diabetes

No More Finger Pricks For Some With Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, chances are you prick your finger once a day or so to check your blood sugar. But a growing body of evidence shows that for most type 2 diabetes patients, routinely tracking your blood sugar, or glucose, doesn’t make any difference for your health. The exception is patients taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug such as glipizide (which goes by the brand name Glucotrol) or glimepiride (Amaryl), which stimulates beta cells in the pancreas to produce insulin. That’s according to Dr. Jack Ende, president of the American College of Physicians, a professional organization of internal medicine specialists. Both insulin and the sulfonylureas can lead to hypoglycemia, or too-low blood sugar, so it’s important to perform self-monitoring, said Ende, an assistant dean at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Good News for Many with Diabetes “If you’re diet-controlled alone, or you’re just on metformin (a widely prescribed diabetes medication), which does not cause hypoglycemia, and you’re not interested in testing, there’s really no reason to do it,” he said. “It’s expensive [test strips alone cost around $1 each]. It’s burdensome.” But, Ende said, he has some patients who, even though they’re controlling their blood sugar by diet alone, continue to prick their finger regularly to check their glucose. Some health-care providers think self-testing makes patients feel empowered, thus enhancing their motivation to maintain control of their blood sugar. — Dr. Laura Young, University of North Carolina School of Medicine “It helps them stay on the diet,” he explained. “It’s a motivating technique,” kind of like hopping on the scale every morning if you’re trying to lose weight Continue reading >>

World’s First Diabetes App Checks Glucose Levels Without Drawing Blood

World’s First Diabetes App Checks Glucose Levels Without Drawing Blood

Forget finger pricking: a first-of-its kind app dubbed the “Holy Grail” for diabetes sufferers offers a non-invasive way to measure blood glucose levels. The world’s first diabetes app of its kind, Epic Health, is an exciting innovation for diabetes sufferers and those wanting to know if they’re pre-diabetic. The free app has been in development for three years, and allows those with diabetes to accurately measure their glucose levels without needing to prick their skin with a needle; all in less than a minute using their smartphone’s camera. Almost all pre-existing blood glucose monitoring equipment is invasive, with Apple stating that a non-invasive way to measure levels would be the “Holy Grail.” Users will also be able to measure their Insulin Resistance levels in a completely non-invasive way, to determine if they are pre-diabetic. This is a breakthrough which the developers hope will help greatly reduce the frequency of people being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, by allowing them to make preventative lifestyle changes. And if you’ve ever wondered how much damage the can of Coca Cola you just downed has done to your system, you’re in luck. powered by plista Image: Epic Health RELATED: Insulin: what it does, and why you need to know about it According to a press release, you’ll be able to view how different food types affect your body, like whether that can of coke increases your heart rate or a plate of broccoli lowers blood pressure. Consuming just half a teaspoon of sugar more than the body really needs, taken over a period of time, can lead to diabetes, nerve damage, heart disease, eye damage and inflammation. You can monitor how exercise or supplements affect vitals, too, particularly important for those wanting to manage their weight more Continue reading >>

Diabetes System Continuously Checks Glucose Without A Finger Prick

Diabetes System Continuously Checks Glucose Without A Finger Prick

Thanks to a system developed by Dexcom, a developer of technology for diabetes, diabetics won’t need to prick their fingers anymore to check their glucose levels. The Dexcom G5 is a glucose monitoring system that uses a sensor, a transmitter, and the user’s smartphone to continuously monitor the user’s glucose levels. “The Dexcom G5 Mobile system is the only continuous glucose monitor that the FDA has approved to replace finger stick blood glucose measurements when making diabetes treatment decisions,” says Jake Leach, senior vice president of research and development at Dexcom. A hair-like, stainless steel needle is inserted into the abdomen and releases the sensor, a flexible, metal wire with proprietary embedded membranes. After insertion, the needle is removed while the sensor is left behind. “These membranes are highly biocompatible and include glucose oxidase enzyme technology, which allows the sensor to accurately measure glucose” Leach says. "It undergoes testing to ensure biocompatibility." The coding also manages the amount of glucose that goes to the sensor enzyme, allowing consistency with the amount of glucose being transported. The sensor is connected to a thin, patch-like transmitter with two electrodes that use a 12-amp signal. As soon as the transmitter snaps with the sensor, it begins to function. The sensor comes out when the patch is removed. The transmitter is similar to a shell, designed with a polymer resin using a custom molding process. It was designed without a seal so it cannot be opened, which keeps it waterproof. Since the transmitter is not disposable, the batteries, two silver oxide coin cells, cannot be replaced. The transmitter, which runs on low power to ensure only its frequency is picked up, should be replaced after thre Continue reading >>

Needle-free Diabetes? European Medtech Inventions Which Painlessly Measure Blood Glucose!

Needle-free Diabetes? European Medtech Inventions Which Painlessly Measure Blood Glucose!

Will the daily routine of finger pricking to monitor blood glucose levels finally come to an end for the millions worldwide living with diabetes? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease that affects over 422 million people worldwide. It is the major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attack and stroke. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers it an epidemic and predicts it will become the 7th biggest cause of death worldwide by 2030. To monitor blood glucose levels, millions of diabetics have to test their blood sugar close to 10 times a day by pricking their finger with a lancet to obtain a small blood sample. But some companies in Europe are trying to find a pain-free alternative that removes the need for needles – here are three startups revolutionizing blood sugar testing. GlucoSense (London, UK) GlucoSense is a spin-out of the University of Leeds funded by NetScientific that is developing a non-invasive device based on photonics technology. Its basic component is a nano-engineered silica glass with ions that fluoresce in the infrared region when stimulated by a low power laser. When the glass is in contact with the user’s skin, the reflected fluorescence signal varies based on the concentration of glucose in their blood and one can acquire the glucose concentration measurement in less than 30 seconds. NovioSense (Nijmegen, the Netherlands) NovioSense is a Dutch startup working on an implantable glucose sensor that uses tear fluid to measure glucose levels. The device consists of a 15 mm-long metal coil coated with a hydrophilic gel. Its flexible form allows the device to bend to conform to the surface of the lower eye lid, where the sensor is placed. The coil moves to the correct place in the eye and the gel coating swells to increase conta Continue reading >>

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