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Very High Blood Sugar

Blood Sugar Level 250-400 Mg/dl (mmol/l)

Blood Sugar Level 250-400 Mg/dl (mmol/l)

you found your levels ranging 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399. Having blood sugar level 250-400 mg/dl, regardless if having eaten or not, means you suffer from mild to moderate diabetes. OneTouch® Glucose Meter - Qualify For a Meter at No Charge Ad Remove the Guesswork. Track Your Blood Glucose Levels w/ OneTouch Verio … OneTouch Learn more My patient's case: Random blood sugar 400-157 Hi, Three weeks before, my husband random blood sugar level is 400 but now 157. Is this good or bad? Aimee, Maldives Answer: Hello Aimee, Random glucose testing is important to distinguish how effective the treatment is. In diabetic people, the numbers for random glucose levels may vary widely. The comparison between days is not the right one. Take the random glucose test multiple times during a day and compare the numbers. In a diabetic person, they may vary more than in normal people but they must not vary too widely. If they do vary a lot this means that the treatment is not effective or your husband is not following it. The glucose levels must stay relatively stable as much as possible. Also, stress, diet and the time of the time may influence the results. It is important to contro Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels: Tips To Help Bring It Down

High Blood Sugar Levels: Tips To Help Bring It Down

Have you suddenly realized that you have high blood sugar levels and not sure how to bring them down? It is important to do something because having high levels for any prolonged length of time is what leads to complications occurring. So let's cover a simple strategy that can help in the short term and talk about lowering levels over the long term. Effective Strategy For Lowering High Blood Sugar Levels 1. Drink water When your blood sugar is high it becomes very thick, like syrup and gets very sluggish. Drinking water helps to dilute your blood and increases your rate of urination, which helps reduce your sugars. Drinking water might sound like a weird thing to do and many doctors would raise their eyebrows at this one but this works very well for the majority of people and is the singular best strategy to help bring your high blood sugar levels down. Simple, yet effective. 2. Exercise Usually water won't be enough to bring down your high levels on it's own. You need to do some gentle exercise to help pump the glucose out of the blood stream and into the muscles. The only way to do that is to MOVE!! Try going for a gentle walk, take the water with you. And if your levels are exceptionally high, it's always a good idea to take someone on the walk with you (just in case). Alternatively just walk around your yard or even just up and down your hallway. It doesn't have to be a fast walk because when blood sugar levels are high you do not want to exert yourself, just get your body moving a bit. Let's emphasize this again: Do not exert yourself when you have high blood sugar levels. If you are unable to walk due to pain or for some other reason, just keep drinking water. 3. Have a high protein snack Eat half an egg, or a tablespoon of natural peanut butter, or a slice of che Continue reading >>

What Causes High Blood Sugar And What Harm Can It Do To My Body?

What Causes High Blood Sugar And What Harm Can It Do To My Body?

Question: What causes high blood sugar and what harm can it do to my body? Answer: Diabetes is a condition where the glucose or sugar levels are too high in the blood. Now, there are many reasons why the blood sugar levels get too high in people with diabetes, but I will only mention the two main defects now. The first is that the pancreas which is an important endocrine organ in our bodies does not secrete enough insulin. Insulin is the hormone that helps glucose go from the bloodstream into the cells of our body to be used for energy. A complicated condition called insulin-resistance is the second main cause of diabetes. Insulin-resistance, which occurs primarily in type 2 diabetes, is when the cells of our body are resistant to the glucose-lowering effects of insulin. If an individual has either not enough insulin and/or insulin-resistance, then high blood sugar levels or diabetes will be present. High blood sugar levels if untreated will cause short-term effects and long-term complications. High blood sugar levels over the short term do not cause any damage to the organs of your body, however they will cause you to feel tired and weak, be thirsty, and urinate a lot, be susceptible to infections and have blurry vision. In fact in the elderly, high blood sugar levels can lead to dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and lead to falls and of course we know getting a broken hip as an elderly individual can be pretty devastating. Now high blood sugar levels over the long term, lets just say years, that can lead to the classic chronic complications of diabetes, eye disease or what we call retinopathy that leads to blindness, kidney disease or nephropathy leading to kidney failure necessitating either dialysis or transplantation, and nerve disease or neuropathy which commonl Continue reading >>

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than normal. It is the main problem caused by diabetes. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called glucose. Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, high blood sugar happens because your body is not making insulin. Insulin moves sugar from the blood into your cells. It is normally made by the pancreas. If you have type 2 diabetes, high blood sugar usually happens because the cells have become unable to use the insulin your body is making. In both cases high levels of sugar build up in the blood. Sometimes people with diabetes can have high blood sugar even if they are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: skipping your diabetes medicine or not taking the right amount of medicine if you are using insulin: a problem with your insulin (for example, the wrong type or damage to the insulin because it has not been stored properly) if you are using an insulin pump: a problem with the pump (for example, the pump is turned off or the catheter has come out) taking medicines that make your blood sugar medicines work less well (steroids, hormones or water pills) eating too much food or drinking too many high-sugar beverages (that is, taking in too many calories) illness, including colds and flu, especially if there is fever infections, such as an abscessed tooth or urinary tract infection Usually high blood sugar causes no symptoms, especially if it is brief. However, if the blood sugar rises to 300 milligrams per deciliter (16.7 millimoles per lite Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar - Self-care

High Blood Sugar - Self-care

High blood sugar is also called high blood glucose, or hyperglycemia. High blood sugar almost always happens in people who have diabetes. High blood sugar occurs when: Your body makes too little insulin. Your body does not respond to the signal insulin is sending. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body move glucose (sugar) from the blood into muscle or fat, where it is stored for later use when energy is needed. Sometimes high blood sugar occurs due to stress from surgery, infection, trauma, or medicines. After the stress is over, blood sugar returns to normal. Symptoms of high blood sugar can include: Being very thirsty or having a dry mouth Having blurry vision Having dry skin Feeling weak or tired Needing to urinate a lot, or needing to get up more often than usual at night to urinate You may have other, more serious symptoms if your blood sugar becomes very high or remains high for a long time. High blood sugar can harm you. If your blood sugar is high, you need to know how to bring it down. If you have diabetes, here are some questions to ask yourself when your blood sugar is high: Are you eating right? Are you eating too much? Have you been following your diabetes meal plan? Did you have a meal or a snack with a lot of carbohydrates, starches, or simple sugars? Are you taking your diabetes medicines correctly? Has your doctor changed your medicines? If you take insulin, have you been taking the correct dose? Is the insulin expired? Or has it been stored in a hot or cold place? Are you afraid of having low blood sugar? Is that causing you to eat too much or take too little insulin or other diabetes medicine? Have you injected insulin into a scar or overused area? Have you been rotating sites? What else has changed? Have you been less active than usual? Do you hav Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And The Problems It Can Cause

High Blood Sugar And The Problems It Can Cause

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Topic Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is most often seen in people who have diabetes that isn't well controlled. The symptoms of high blood sugar can be mild, moderate, or severe. Mild high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently higher than your target range (usually 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) to 350 mg/dL in adults and 200 mg/dL to 240 mg/dL in children), you may have mild symptoms of high blood sugar. You may urinate more than usual if you are drinking plenty of liquids. Some people who have diabetes may not notice any symptoms when their blood sugar level is in this range. The main symptoms of high blood sugar are: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Weight loss. Fatigue. Increased appetite. Young children are unable to recognize symptoms of high blood sugar. Parents need to do a home blood sugar test on their child whenever they suspect high blood sugar. If you don't drink enough liquids to replace the fluids lost from high blood sugar levels, you can become dehydrated. Young children can become dehydrated very quickly. Symptoms of dehydration include: A dry mouth and increased thirst. Warm, dry skin. Moderate to severe high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently high (usually above 350 mg/dL in adults and above 240 mg/dL in children), you may have moderate to severe symptoms of high blood sugar. These symptoms include: Blurred vision. Extreme thirst. Lightheadedness. Flushed, hot, dry skin. Restlessness, drowsiness, or difficulty waking up. If your body produces little or no insulin (people with type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2 diabetes), you also may have: Rapid, deep breathing. A fast heart rate and a weak pulse. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and/or vomiting. If your Continue reading >>

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs Can you have high blood sugar without carbs? Well, its important to look at common beliefs about high blood sugar first. High blood sugar is bad. Carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Therefore carbohydrates are bad. The theory is simple, and yet incredibly flawed. The truth is, you can have chronically high blood sugar even while religiously avoiding every starch and sugar in sight. Low-carb forums are littered with posts asking a very relevant question: Why is my blood sugar so high when Im not eating any carbs? The answer is simple, yet often overlooked. The Hormone that Raises Blood Sugar: No Carbohydrates Required If the body were an engine, glucose would be its fuel. Most people think glucose only comes from carbohydrates (sugar and starch), but protein can also be turned into glucose when there arent enough carbs around to do the job. This is called gluconeogenesis, and its performed by one of the major stress hormones cortisol. When you have high cortisol levels (from diet, lifestyle, etc.), the cortisol rapidly breaks down protein into glucose, which can raise blood sugar levels considerably. For some folks, this results in chronically high blood sugareven if they are on a low-carb diet. The trouble is, cortisol isnt just breaking down the protein you eat. Its doing something far more destructive. The body is quite a smart machine, and it has no problem taking detours to get energy if necessary. If your body isnt getting the energy it needs from your diet, it has a back-up source: its own tissue. It sounds kind of cannibalistic, eating your own lean body tissue for energy. I mean, I seriously doubt any one of you would relish cutting off a chunk of your leg for dinner. I know I wouldnt. But every time your body uses c Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

High blood sugar, which is called hyperglycemia, means that you have more sugar in your bloodstream than normal. High blood sugar is related to insulin, the hormone that lets your body use sugar as fuel. If you have too little insulin, your body cannot use all the sugar in your blood and it builds up in the bloodstream. The same thing happens if your body cannot use insulin efficiently, which is called insulin resistance. High blood sugar damages the body’s cells over time. It is important to try and manage blood sugars to avoid prolonged high blood sugar and in particular, extremely high blood sugar which can lead to severe short term consequences, particularly diabetic ketoacidosis. According to the American Diabetes Association, blood sugars upon waking (fasting) should be between 70 and 130 mg/dL (3.9 and 7.2 mmol) and blood sugars after a meal (post-prandial) should be below 180 mg/dL (10 mmol). However, in someone without diabetes, blood sugars will typically range between 70 and 100 mg/dL (3.9 and 5.6 mmol) with spikes of to between 110 and 150 mg/dL (6 and 9 mmol) after extremely high carbohydrate meals.1 Sometimes illness or certain medications such as beta blockers or corticosteroids can elevate blood sugars. Read “Is My Blood Sugar Normal?” for more information. The only way to be sure of a high blood sugar is to check with a glucose monitor since the symptoms of high blood sugar can sometimes be confused with illness or stress or medication side effects. In the case of type 1 diabetes, a person doesn’t make insulin and blood sugars rise unless insulin is given. In the case of type 2 diabetes, a person doesn’t make enough insulin or their body isn’t using their insulin efficiently, causing blood sugar to rise. In people with diabetes, high blood s Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms And Information

High Blood Sugar Symptoms And Information

What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than normal. It is the main problem caused by diabetes. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called glucose. How does it occur? Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, high blood sugar happens because your body is not making insulin. Insulin moves sugar from the blood into your cells. It is normally made by the pancreas. If you have type 2 diabetes, high blood sugar usually happens because the cells have become unable to use the insulin your body is making. In both cases high levels of sugar build up in the blood. Sometimes people with diabetes can have high blood sugar even if they are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: skipping your diabetes medicine or not taking the right amount of medicine if you are using insulin: a problem with your insulin (for example, the wrong type or damage to the insulin because it has not been stored properly) if you are using an insulin pump: a problem with the pump (for example, the pump is turned off or the catheter has come out) taking medicines that make your blood sugar medicines work less well (steroids, hormones or water pills) eating or drinking too much (that is, taking in too many calories) not getting enough physical activity emotional or physical stress illness, including colds and flu, especially if there is fever infections, such as an abscessed tooth or urinary tract infection Even if you don’t have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar for a brief time after you eat a food very high in sugar. For exam Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than recommended for you. If you don’t keep your blood sugar at a normal, healthy level most of the time, you will increase your risk of heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney problems, and loss of vision. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called blood glucose. What is the cause? Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. Your body breaks down some of the foods you eat into sugar. Normally the hormone insulin moves this sugar into your cells, where your body uses it for energy. In diabetes the insulin is not moving the sugar into the cells, so it builds up in the bloodstream and starts to cause problems. Sometimes you may have high blood sugar even though you are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: Skipping your diabetes medicine Not taking the right amount of diabetes medicine Taking certain medicines that increase your blood sugar or make your blood sugar medicines work less well Taking in too many calories by eating large portions of food, choosing too many high-calorie foods, or drinking too many high-sugar beverages Eating too many carbohydrates, such as foods made mainly with sugar, white flour (in bread, biscuits, pancakes, for example), white potatoes, or white rice Not getting enough physical activity (exercise lowers your blood sugar) Having increased emotional or physical stress Being sick, including colds, flu, an infected tooth, or a urinary tract infection, especially if you have a fever If you are using insulin, having a problem with your insulin (for examp Continue reading >>

How To Bring Down High Blood Sugar Levels

How To Bring Down High Blood Sugar Levels

Tweet Having high blood sugar levels can be discomforting and many people wish to know what they can do to help to bring down high blood glucose levels. We look at some of the options for lowering blood glucose in the short term. High blood sugar is commonly known as hyperglycemia. What are the signs of high blood sugar? The classic symptoms of high blood glucose levels are: Feeling very thirsty Needing to go the toilet often Having a dry mouth Feeling tired/lethargic Feeling uncomfortable and irritable Check your blood sugar If you have take medication that may cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), it’s highly advisable to check your blood sugar levels before you try to bring your sugar levels down. This is just in case your blood sugar is normal or low, which can be the case in some situations. Testing of blood sugar before bringing your levels down is particularly important if you take insulin. When to call for medical advice It is important to note that very high blood glucose levels can be dangerous and it is important to be aware of the symptoms and risk factors of the following conditions: Diabetic ketoacidosis - a short term complication most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes Hyperosmolar Hyperglycaemic State - a short term complication most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes If you are struggling to keep your blood glucose levels under control, speak to your GP or consultant who can advise you or refer you onto a diabetes education course. Correcting high blood sugar levels with insulin If you take insulin, one way to reduce blood sugar is to inject insulin. However, be careful as insulin can take 4 hours or longer to be fully absorbed, so you need to make sure you take into account how much insulin you may already have in your body that is yet t Continue reading >>

7 Clear Signs You Could Have High Blood Sugar

7 Clear Signs You Could Have High Blood Sugar

You’ve got cotton mouth iStock/BraunS When your kidneys can no longer filter out glucose, the body becomes dehydrated. And while a little thirst may seem like a minor inconvenience, over time dehydration damages the body and leads to other symptoms, including a spike in blood sugar levels as the body revs up adrenaline, a natural insulin blocker. Not sure if you’re dehydrated? Check these unexpected signs of dehydration. iStock/SasinParaksa Although it seems illogical, increased thirst is related to frequent urination. When blood sugar is high, the body directs excess fluid to the kidneys, causing them to work overtime to filter the blood and produce extra urine output. Since increased thirst may lead to increased drinking, you might not notice at first, but if urine output seems to be more than what you’d expect based on what you’re drinking, it may point to high blood sugar. Activly You’ve got brain fog iStock/Squaredpixels Much like cars need gas, the human body requires fuel in order to operate optimally. Glucose is the fuel that powers the body, and when there isn’t enough insulin to move that fuel through the body properly, the body doesn’t get the power it needs. That often leads to general fatigue and trouble concentrating. Check out these tips for regaining your focus. Everything’s blurry iStock/aykuterd When blood sugar levels are too high, the lens of the eye swells, making vision blurry. Lowering the blood sugar should return vision to normal. (Here are 14 foods with way more sugar than you thought.) Diabetics are recommended to receive regular eye exams for this reason, as extended and severe high blood sugar can cause permanent damage, even blindness. Don’t miss these expert tips for taking good care of your eyes. Scrapes and bruises are Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

The human body naturally has sugar, or glucose, in the blood. The right amount of blood sugar gives the body's cells and organs energy. The liver and muscles produce some blood sugar, but most of it comes from food and drinks that contain carbohydrates. In order to keep blood sugar levels within a normal range, the body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes blood sugar and delivers it to the body's cells. Contents of this article: What does it feel like to have high blood sugar levels? Blood sugar is fuel for the body's organs and functions. But having high blood sugar doesn't provide a boost in energy. In fact, it's often the opposite. Because the body's cells can't access the blood sugar for energy, a person may feel tiredness, hunger, or exhaustion frequently. In addition, high sugar in the blood goes into the kidneys and urine, which attracts more water, causing frequent urination. This can also lead to increased thirst, despite drinking enough liquids. High blood sugar can cause sudden or unexplained weight loss. This occurs because the body's cells aren't getting the glucose they need, so the body burns muscle and fat for energy instead. High blood sugar can also cause numbness, burning, or tingling in the hands, legs, and feet. This is caused by diabetic neuropathy, a complication of diabetes that often occurs after many years of high blood sugar levels. What does high blood sugar mean for the rest of the body? Over time, the body's organs and systems can be harmed by high blood sugar. Blood vessels become damaged, and this can lead to complications, including: Damage to the eye and loss of vision Kidney disease or failure Nerve problems in the skin, especially the feet, leading to sores, infections, and wound healing problems Causes of high blood sugar Continue reading >>

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