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Uti And High Blood Sugar

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection that grows within the urinary tract - anywhere from the kidneys, the ureters, the bladder and through to the urethra. Urinary tract infections can be a particular problem for people with diabetes as sugar in the urine makes for a fertile breeding ground for bacteria. This is supported by data from the American Diabetes Association (a report at the 73rd Scientific Sessions of the ADA), which showed 9.4% of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes had a UTI compared to only 5.7% of people without diabetes. [92] What are the symptoms of a urinary tract infection? Urinary tract infections are characterised by two types: Lower urinary tract infections or Cystitis - bacterial infection affecting the bladder and the tube that transports urine from your bladder out of your body via the penis or vagina (urethra) Upper urinary tract infections or Pyelonephritis - bacterial infection affecting the kidneys and the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder (ureters) Lower urinary tract infection (affecting the bladder and urethra): Pain or stinging when passing urine (dysuria) Persistent feeling of the need to urinate Cloudy and foul-smelling urine Strong and bad smell of urine Abdominal pan (stomach pain) Back pain Blood in the urine (hematuria) Upper urinary tract infection (affecting the kidneys and ureters): High temperature / fever Constant shivering Vomiting Back pain Pain in your side (flank pain) How serious are urinary tract infections? Some people may find themselves particularly prone to UTIs. Upper urinary tract infections (pyelonephritis) are the more serious of the two. In this case the bacteria have managed to reach the tubes connecting the bladder (ureters) to the kidneys. If the bacterial infection reaches the kidney Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

The urgent need to go. The burning pain when you do. The cloudy, foul-smelling urine. If you've experienced a urinary tract or bladder infection, you'd probably prefer to avoid another one. Unfortunately, if you have diabetes, you are up to twice as likely as those without the disease to develop these often painful infections. They’re especially common among women. But there’s a lot you can do to avoid them and to ease your discomfort when they do strike. Making healthy lifestyle choices is key to managing type 2 diabetes, but it can be hard to stay on track. Dr. Anthony Cardillo explains that focusing on diet, exercise and stress reduction can help you maintain control of your diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Why Diabetes Poses a Risk Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, occur when bacteria or other bugs invade your body’s drainage system. Normally, your immune defenses banish these bugs before they can grow and multiply. But if you have diabetes, the following factors interfere: Diabetes impairs some parts of your immune response. You have fewer white blood cells and T cells to fight off invading bacteria, viruses, and fungi. For the same reason, diabetics often develop UTIs caused by less commonly encountered germs. Routine antibiotics may be ineffective. Nerve damage can keep your bladder from emptying, either by weakening muscles or scrambling the signals between your brain and urinary system. Urine that remains in your body too long poses a greater infection risk. Sugar in your blood and urine can also contribute to a greater risk for UTI. Besides pain and Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Utis

Type 1 Diabetes And Utis

WRITTEN BY: Georgina Cunningham It’s my second trip to the hospital in a month. I’ve already missed five days of work. I’ve been poked and prodded, I have no good veins left. I’m already covered in bruises from last time and I just don’t want to be here again. I’m putting on a brave face, but everything inside me is telling me to scream at the top of my lungs. I’m doubled over with back pain, a migraine, a horrible fever, tachycardia, and to top it off I have constant low blood sugar. “You again,” says the emergency department doctor. We both know the drill — fluids, intravenous antibiotics and a nice four-night stay in the Acute Ward. I would consider myself a healthy person. I eat a balanced diet, I walk everywhere and my blood sugar levels are even “better than a person not living with Type 1 diabetes” (according to my endocrinologist). I’m hygienic and I had never had a UTI up until this moment. So, to be honest, I couldn’t tell you how I got here. While a UTI might typically be something that is easily treated, it can become dangerous for someone with Type 1 diabetes. It can spread easily through your blood and your kidneys can become damaged. Our bodies can’t fight infections as well as they should, so it’s important to know the signs and make sure you advocate for your own body. Everyone’s bodies are different, even amongst the Type 1 community. When I had the initial infection my sugars were generally stable, so long as I ate. But as soon as the infection spread and I incorporated antibiotics, a small appetite and my normal insulin dosage, my sugars went spiraling down. I’d wake up sitting at 2.3, sometimes even 1.8, in the middle of the night. I’d be tired and grumpy and the last thing I want to do is down some Carbotest (a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

In this article we will cover everything you need to know about diabetes and your risk for Urinary Tract Infections. Do you have an increased risk of Urinary Tract Infections now that you have diabetes? We will cover what a Urinary Tract Infection is, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment guidelines, as well as why they are more common in people with diabetes. More importantly, we will discuss steps you can take to prevent them! What Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? A urinary tract infection or UTI is an infection anywhere in your bladder, kidneys or in the urinary system. An infection of the upper urinary tract or the bladder is called a bladder infection or cystitis. An infection in the urethra is called urethritis. Women tend to be more at risk of these types of infections due to their anatomy; they have a much shorter area between the urethra and the opening to the urethra to the bladder. Urinary tract infections are rare in men under 50 due to their anatomy. A more serious infection of the lower urinary tract is an infection of the kidney and the ureters and is called pyelonephritis. This is a complication and occurs when the bladder infection progresses to the kidneys. I highly advise reading the following articles: According to the Stanford Medicine’s Michael Hsieh Lab, half of women and men will have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) during our lifetime at least once. They are the most common infection, and can lead to death in patients who are experiencing it severely. Antibiotics are the most effective therapy.The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases account 8.1 million visits to the clinic, hospitals for UTI purposes. For women, the risk of getting a UTI is 50 percent greater than a man. What Are The Symptoms of a UTI? L Continue reading >>

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections

People whose diabetes is not properly controlled have twice the risk of developing infections. In addition to diabetes, you could be more susceptible to urinary tract infections if: Your blood glucose (sugar) levels are not properly controlled. Sugar in the urine promotes bacterial growth. Your nervous system is already affected by diabetes (neuropathy). You could have a “lazy bladder” that does not empty completely. You are a woman. Certain anatomical traits, such as having a shorter urethra, increase the risk of bacterial contamination. You already have diabetes complications in your kidneys or blood vessels. This could be a sign that your diabetes is not properly controlled. You have had a urinary tract infection within the last year. People who have had infections within the last year are more at risk of a recurrence. When to consult? To avoid urinary tract infections, consult your doctor if one or more of these symptoms occur: Fever More frequent urination Burning sensation when urinating Urine has an unpleasant odour False urge to urinate Blood in the urine Abdominal pain when urinating Prevention As is the case for all types of infections if you have diabetes, it is crucial that you maintain your blood glucose (sugar) levels within the target range. Wash your hands often. Do not ignore the urge to urinate. Be sure to stay well hydrated. Quit smoking if you are a smoker. What about cranberry juice? Although studies on cranberry juice seem promising, none has clearly shown that cranberry juice can be used to treat or prevent urinary tract infections. If you nevertheless decide to drink cranberry juice, be aware of the amount of sugar in the juice or cocktail, especially if you are diabetic. Research and text: Diabetes Québec Team of Health Care Professionals S Continue reading >>

How Does An Infection Increase Blood Sugar In Diabetics?

How Does An Infection Increase Blood Sugar In Diabetics?

Video of the Day When struck by infection, the body releases stress hormones that help it fight the infection but at the same time cause an increase in blood glucose. Insulin resistance also increases, causing a further rise in glucose levels by impairing the body's ability to use glucose for energy. Doctors and diabetes educators recommend having a sick-day plan for managing common infections at home. Part of a sick-day plan is knowing how often you should test your blood glucose when you're not feeling well. Ask you doctor if you also need to test your urine for ketones when you're sick. Staying hydrated is important since dehydration can occur when blood glucose levels are too high. A sick-day plan includes knowing when to call your doctor or seek emergency treatment, as well as how to maintain your usual carbohydrate intake when you don't feel like eating your normal foods. If you use insulin, work with your health-care team to make a plan for adjusting dosage to control elevated blood glucose levels. Some studies indicate that people with diabetes are at higher risk for certain types of infection, such as urinary tract infections and yeast infections. Existing high blood glucose levels in the body create an environment where certain micro-organisms can thrive. In addition, diabetes can cause a person to get sick when she gets an infection, such as the flu or pneumonia. For this reason, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control recommend that people with diabetes be vaccinated for influenza, pneumococcal pneumonia and tetanus/diphtheria. Your health-care team can help you learn about the signs and symptoms of infection and to make a sick-day plan. Always consult your doctor if you suspect an infection and for advice on how to take care of it. Your doctor may recommend a Continue reading >>

Is There A Connection Between Blood Sugar Control And Urinary Tract Infections?

Is There A Connection Between Blood Sugar Control And Urinary Tract Infections?

This study investigated the relationship between blood sugar control and urinary tract infections in women with type 1 diabetes. The study concluded that the frequency of urinary tract infections (UTIs) increases with poor blood sugar control. It is known that diabetes is associated with a higher risk for UTI. A UTI is an infection in part of your urinary system, such as the bladder or kidneys. A UTI occurs when bacteria enter the urinary tract and start to multiply. Diabetes and other conditions that influence the immune system can affect defense against germs, thus increasing the risk of UTIs. However, the relationship between blood sugar control and the risk of UTI’s is not fully understood. It is thought that higher amounts of sugar in the urine can help bacteria to grow. This study examined the association between blood sugar levels and UTIs in women with type 1 diabetes. 17,572 women with type 1 diabetes were included in this study. 15% of the women reported having had at least one UTI diagnosed by a doctor. The relationship between the women’s HbA1c levels (average blood sugar level over 3 months) and the number of UTI’s was assessed. For every 1% increase in HbA1c level there was a 21% increase in the number of UTIs. Recent HbA1c levels were higher among women reporting UTIs compared to women not reporting UTIs. The current study concluded that the frequency of urinary tract infections (UTIs) increases with poor blood sugar control. A limitation of this study was that it relied on patients to report UTIs. The researchers did not carry out any laboratory testing to evaluate these reports. Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Go to: Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by variable degrees of insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and increased glucose production. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of infections, with the urinary tract being the most frequent infection site.1–4 Various impairments in the immune system,5,6 in addition to poor metabolic control of diabetes,7,8 and incomplete bladder emptying due to autonomic neuropathy9,10 may all contribute in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections (UTI) in diabetic patients. Factors that were found to enhance the risk for UTI in diabetics include age, metabolic control, and long term complications, primarily diabetic nephropathy and cystopathy.11 The spectrum of UTI in these patients ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) to lower UTI (cystitis), pyelonephritis, and severe urosepsis. Serious complications of UTI, such as emphysematous cystitis and pyelonephritis, renal abscesses and renal papillary necrosis, are all encountered more frequently in type 2 diabetes than in the general population.12,13 Type 2 diabetes is not only a risk factor for community-acquired UTI but also for health care-associated UTI,14 catheter-associated UTI,15 and post-renal transplant-recurrent UTI.16 In addition, these patients are more prone to have resistant pathogens as the cause of their UTI, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive Enterobacteriaceae,17 fluoroquinolone-resistant uropathogens,18 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,19 and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.20 Type 2 diabetes is also a risk factor for fungal UTI, mostly caused by Candida.21 Diabetes is also associated with worse outcomes of UTI, including longer hospitalizations and incre Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) in Diabetes Mellitus Author: John L Brusch, MD, FACP; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD more... Predisposition to urinary tract infections (UTIs) in diabetes mellitus results from several factors. Susceptibility increases with longer duration and greater severity of diabetes. [ 1 ] High urine glucose content and defective host immune factors predispose to infection. Hyperglycemia causes neutrophil dysfunction by increasing intracellular calcium levels and interfering with actin and, thus, diapedesis and phagocytosis. Vaginal candidiasis and vascular disease also play a role in recurrent infections. Recently, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors, such as dapagliflozin, has produced concern about an increased risk of urinary tract infections in recipients of these medications. Levels of urinary glucose increased with greater doses of the medication; however, the incidence of urinary tract infections did not. Nonetheless, such patients do appear to be at a 3- to 5-fold increased risk of genital infections. [ 2 , 3 ] Over time, patients with diabetes may develop cystopathy, nephropathy, and renal papillary necrosis, complications that predispose them to UTIs. Long-term effects of diabetic cystopathy include vesicourethral reflux and recurrent UTIs. In addition, as many as 30% of women with diabetes have some degree of cystocele, cystourethrocele, or rectocele. All of these may contribute to the frequency and severity of UTIs in female diabetics. Complicated UTIs in patients who have diabetes include renal and perirenal abscess, emphysematous pyelonephritis, emphysematous cystitis, fungal infections, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, and papillary necrosis. The current article focuses on emphysematous UTIs, with which diabetes is closely associ Continue reading >>

Can Uti Cause An Increase In Blood Sugar Levels In A Non-diabetic Person?

Can Uti Cause An Increase In Blood Sugar Levels In A Non-diabetic Person?

No, he is a diabetic, which very often goes undetected for many years, until because of having another medical condition blood tests are done and diabetes is detected. It is rather odd that a male would have recurrent UTIs. Has anatomic abnormalities e.g. an obstructive prostate, kidney/bladder stones, anatomical variants been ruled out by imagining studies? Continue reading >>

11 Sneaky Causes Of Urinary Tract Infections

11 Sneaky Causes Of Urinary Tract Infections

Let’s be honest: Getting a urinary tract infection is the worst. With symptoms that include a burning sensation when you go to the bathroom, not being able to pee a lot (even though you feel like you do), and foul-smelling or dark urine—to name just a few—UTIs can feel like straight-up torture. And considering the fact that one out of five women will get a UTI at some point in their lives, it’s safe to say that it’s the type of misery that loves company—mostly female company, that is. Though dudes aren’t totally off the hook, it’s significantly harder for them to get UTIs. It all boils down to anatomy, explains Mary Jane Minkin, MD, a clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Yale School of Medicine. Bacteria that cause UTIs have to make their way from the back door to the front and then up the urethra in order to wreak havoc on the urinary system. Because guys are (hashtag) blessed with a longer urethra than women, the bacteria have a further way to travel, making it more difficult for them to cause a UTI in the male body. One thing that is true for both men and women? Once you’ve had one UTI, you’re more likely to have another. While this all may sound pretty doom-and-gloom, that whole knowledge-is-power thing might help you figure out why your body seems like it’s out to get you. Here, the sneaky stuff that ups your risk for getting a dreaded UTI. 11 Sneaky Causes of UTIs Binging on cookies doesn’t only affect your waistline—it can actually lead to a UTI. “If you eat tons of added sugars and get a real surge in your blood sugar, you may end up with some of that sugar in your urine,” Minkin explains. And the bacteria that cause UTIs love feeding on sugar, so you run the risk of essentially providing a feast for them whenever Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Utis

What You Need To Know About Utis

Burning when you urinate. A frequent urge to urinate. Pain in your back or abdomen. Do any of these symptoms sound familiar? These are all symptoms of a urinary tract infection, or UTI, for short. Studies show that people with Type 2 diabetes have a greater risk of getting a UTI than people without diabetes. Despite the fact that UTIs are all too common and downright annoying, they can also lead to more serious situations if they’re not caught and treated. What is a UTI, anyway? A UTI is an infection in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract includes your kidneys, bladder, ureters, urethra, and, in men, prostate. Most UTIs occur in your bladder, the organ that stores your urine. What causes a UTI? A UTI is caused by bacteria, usually from the bowels. Normally, the urinary tract system has safeguards to protect against infection. For example, the ureters, which are the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder, have one-way valves to prevent urine from backing up into the kidneys. The process of emptying your bladder (called urination) also helps to flush out bacteria and other microbes. And a healthy immune system helps protect against infection, as well. Why are UTIs more common in people with diabetes? UTIs are the second most common type of infection. Women are 10 times more likely to get a UTI than men because of their anatomy. In fact, more than 50% of women will have a UTI at some point in their lives. If you’re a woman with Type 2 diabetes, your risk may be even higher, according to two recent studies. In one study, 9% of the subjects with diabetes had UTIs compared with 6% of those without diabetes. And the second study showed that people with diabetes had a 60% higher risk of getting a UTI compared to those without diabetes. Why are people with Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Its Impact On Your Urinary And Sexual Health

Diabetes And Its Impact On Your Urinary And Sexual Health

Diabetes and urological health issues are closely connected. Diabetics are prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs), bladder issues and sexual dysfunction. Diabetes can often make your urologic conditions even worse because it can impact blood flow, nerves and sensory function in the body. Roughly 29.1 million people or 9.3 % of Americans have diabetes. Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose (blood sugar) levels are too high. Glucose is the body's main source of fuel and comes from the foods you eat. After your body breaks down food, glucose enters the bloodstream. The cells in your body need this sugar for energy, but a hormone called insulin must be present for the glucose to enter the cells. Your pancreas, a large gland that sits behind the stomach, is what makes the insulin. In people without diabetes, the pancreas makes the right amount of insulin to move the sugar from the blood into the cells. But, in people with type 1 diabetes, the body doesn't make insulin at all. In people with type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't make or use insulin the right way. This is called insulin resistance. Without enough insulin, glucose stays in the blood. Having too much of this in the bloodstream can harm your kidneys, eyes and other organs. The A1C test is used by doctors to see how well you're taking care of your diabetes. This blood test gives facts about a person's blood sugar levels over the past two to three months. The American Diabetes Association suggests an A1C of 7 percent or below. Bladder Conditions and Urinary Tract Infections "Diabetes can affect the function and structure of the lower urinary tract, which in turn may play a role in patients with diabetes having more UTIs, overactive or underactive bladder, and problems with urination," says Michael J. Kenn Continue reading >>

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

Upswing: Caffeine Your blood sugar can rise after you have coffee -- even black coffee with no calories -- thanks to the caffeine. The same goes for black tea, green tea, and energy drinks. Each person with diabetes reacts to foods and drinks differently, so it's best to keep track of your own responses. Ironically, other compounds in coffee may help prevent type 2 diabetes in healthy people. Many of these will raise your blood sugar levels. Why? They can still have plenty of carbs from starches. Check the total carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts label before you dig in. You should also pay attention to sugar alcohols such as sorbitol and xylitol. They add sweetness with fewer carbs than sugar (sucrose), but they may still have enough to boost your levels. One study found that people with type 2 diabetes who switched to a vegan (or all vegetable-based) diet had better blood sugar control and needed less insulin. A boost in fiber from whole grains and beans might play a role, by slowing down the digestion of carbs. But scientists need more research to know if going vegan really helps diabetes. Talk to your doctor before you make major diet changes. Blood sugar can dip dangerously low during shut-eye for some people with diabetes, especially if they take insulin. It's best to check your levels at bedtime and when you wake up. A snack before bed may help. For some people, blood sugar can rise in the morning -- even before breakfast -- due to changes in hormones or a drop in insulin. Regular testing is important. One option is a continuous blood glucose monitor, which can alert you to highs and lows. Physical activity is a great health booster for everyone. But people with diabetes should tailor it to what they need. When you work out hard enough to sweat and raise your h Continue reading >>

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