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Up & Up Blood Glucose Meter

How To Use A Glucose Meter

How To Use A Glucose Meter

A glucose meter is a device you use at home to measure the level of glucose in your blood ​Blood glucose monitoring is an important part of your diabetes care, especially if you are taking insulin. ​ ​ ​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​ ​Follow These Steps ​ Prepare these items: glucose meter test strip lancet device needle (lancet) alcohol swab dry swab puncture-proof plastic container with a screw-on cap (e.g. shampoo container) Check to make sure: the insulin and test strips have not passed their expiry dates you are using the correct type of batteries the box of test strips comes with a code key the code key number is the same as that on the box of test strips ​ Calibrate the glucose meter: Insert the code key into the test strip slot. Check that the number appearing on the screen is the same as that on the box of test strips. You must calibrate the glucose meter each time you open a new box of test strips. Wash your hands with soap and water: Prepare the lancet device: Replace the lancet cover carefully. Adjust the depth of your lancet device according to your skin thickness. Prime the lancet device by pressing the release button (for some products, you need to pull and release the lever). Prepare the glucose meter: Remove test strip from the foil or from the test strip container. Insert it into the test strip slot and this will automatically turn the meter on. ​ Test your blood glucose level: Wipe one finger (index, middle or ring) with an alcohol swap and let it dry. Press the lancet device firmly against the side of your finger. Push button to release the needle. Squeeze your finger to get a drop of blood. Wait for the result to show on the screen. This is your blood glucose level. Put away items safely: Remove the lancet cover. Recap the needle before r Continue reading >>

New Blood Glucose Meter Provides People With Diabetes An Accurate, Affordable Solution For Glucose Testing-without Insurance Copays

New Blood Glucose Meter Provides People With Diabetes An Accurate, Affordable Solution For Glucose Testing-without Insurance Copays

Now a new, slim-designed Abbott blood glucose meter with high accuracy is available over-the-counter at major U.S. retailers at a lower cost than other branded meters and test strips, and without the need for insurance paperwork and copays often needed to purchase branded diabetes supplies. This new meter, the FreeStyle Precision Neo Blood Glucose Monitoring System™, received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance and is now available at a cost of between $14-$17 USD for 25 strips and a one-time fee for the meter, which ranges from $22-$28 USD. "People with diabetes depend every single day on trusted, high-quality tools to monitor their glucose levels," said Robert Ford, senior vice president, Diabetes Care, Abbott. "This dependence makes it even more important to ensure people have affordable access to accurate, fast, and easy-to-use systems such as FreeStyle Precision Neo system. Today, more than ever, consumers have more influence on their healthcare decisions, and Abbott is focused on offering products that provide the highest standard of accuracy, and are also affordable and easily accessible over the counter." According to the American Diabetes Association, the medical costs of people living with diabetes are about 2.3 times higher than for people without the disease.i In addition, the process associated with healthcare insurance paperwork can be a challenge for some individuals. To help provide a solution, Abbott developed FreeStyle Precision Neo—the first system from Abbott's FreeStyle family of products that is available over the counter with preferred copay pricing, giving patients the option to pay out of pocket to obtain their monitor and test strips. The FreeStyle Precision Neo System features include: Monitor's memory holds up to 1,000 readings S Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

Best Glucometers

Best Glucometers

Compact, easy-to-use glucometers are the norm When it comes to blood glucose meters, fewer steps mean fewer mistakes. So the best glucose meters are those that make the basic process of testing your blood sure as foolproof as possible: Insert test strip, prick finger, apply blood, read result. The tiny FreeStyle Lite (Est. $25) home glucose monitor -- itself no bigger than a pack of gum -- goes one step further by requiring only 0.3 microliters of blood for each sample. Users love the small sample size, which they say makes the testing process much less painful and intimidating. They also appreciate that the meter beeps once you've added enough blood and that if you don't get enough blood onto the test strip with your first try, you have up to 60 seconds to add more blood. There's also no need for manual coding when you open a new set of test strips, which helps cut down on possible errors. Even more important than its comfort and user-friendly features, the FreeStyle Lite receives some of the best scores for accuracy and repeatability in clinical trials and from a leading consumer research organization. And although this isn't the newest meter on the block, users still love it for its reliability. Other features that make the FreeStyle Lite so popular with users include its simple three-button operation, a backlit screen and illuminated test strip port for discreet testing in the dark, and the ability to store up to 400 readings and calculate averages that show blood glucose trends over time. The FreeStyle Lite also has a data port that lets you download your readings into a Windows or OS X computer using FreeStyle's Auto-Assist desktop program. The program compiles several types of reports including meter settings, meal event averages, daily statistics and a snapshot Continue reading >>

Accuracy Standards In Glucose Meters: Why Do Different Meters Read Different Results?

Accuracy Standards In Glucose Meters: Why Do Different Meters Read Different Results?

Our diabetes educator helps you understand your blood glucose meter. My patients frequently come to me with questions concerning their blood glucose testing equipment. A commonly asked question is “Why do my testing results vary meter to meter?” The answer simplified is that meters are tested for accuracy and must adhere to standards that prior to 2014 in the US, could vary by 20 percent and can now only vary by 15 percent. The variation allowance confused a lot of patients. This can be especially alarming when using a new product that doesn’t seem to “match up” to a blood glucose meter you have been using. The ISO, International Standards Organization, has guidelines that meter companies must meet. The FDA in the US follows these guidelines. Currently, all measured blood glucose meter values must be within 15 percent of the true lab value of blood glucose 95 percent of the time and within 20 percent of the lab value 99 percent of the time. The standards also go on to state that 95 percent of all test results be within 20 percent of test results greater than 75mg/dl and within 15mg/dl for values The standards also go on to state that 95 percent of all test results be within 20 percent of test results greater than 75mg/dl and within 15mg/dl for values below 75mg/dl (this additional criterion was set up for meters used in physician offices.) Although this can be confusing, a blood glucose value that is a lab value of 100mg/dl could conceivably show up on a meter as 80-120mg/dl and still be considered accurate. Fortunately, Dario has undergone considerable testing and meets and/or exceeds ISO standards by being within blank percent 99% of the time. What does this mean for you, the end user? This means that meters manufactured before the stricter ISO standards wer Continue reading >>

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

Chris Hannemann, a 32-year-old product engineer in San Diego, California, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 8. For the past 24 years, multiple times a day, every day, he’s pricked his finger and used a blood glucose meter to measure the amount of sugar in his blood and decide whether to administer either insulin or a snack.The meter Hannemann uses regularly sometimes gives him readings that suggest his blood sugar levels are normal, even when he feels woozy or loses fine motor control (early effects of low blood sugar levels). “As someone who’s been comatose multiple times [due to other diabetic issues],” he told us, “it’s not fun.” During a doctor’s visit, Hannemann noticed that his glucose levels in lab tests seemed different than the measurements he would take himself. He suspected that his blood glucose meter was giving him inaccurate readings. To prove his theory, he ran a series of tests on 10 different meters. Hannemann found that readings from different meters varied from each other by as much as 60 percent, even though they were analyzing the same drop of blood, and varied 30 percent on average from each other. He published his findings in a Medium post. This discovery frustrated him because there’s so little information on glucose meter accuracy. “As a patient, you have no knowledge of this,” he said. Now, if he is using the inaccurate meter, he mentally calculates the difference. “If I check my glucose and it reads 90, I have to remind myself, ‘Oh, you actually need to eat something before you go drive or run or something.’” Accuracy matters to people like Hannemann and the many patients like him. Twenty-one million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes, and another eight million have diabetes but don’t know Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Many types of blood glucose meters are available. Here's how to choose one that fits your needs and lifestyle. If you have diabetes, you'll likely need a blood glucose meter to measure and display the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. Exercise, food, medications, stress and other factors affect your blood glucose level. Using a blood glucose meter can help you better manage your diabetes by tracking any fluctuations in your blood glucose level. Many types of blood glucose meters are available, from basic models to more-advanced meters with multiple features and options. The cost of blood glucose meters and test strips varies, as does insurance coverage. Study your options before deciding which model to buy. Choosing the right meter When selecting a blood glucose meter, it can help to know the basics of how they work. To use most blood glucose meters, you first insert a test strip into the device. Then you prick a clean fingertip with a special needle (lancet) to get a drop of blood. You carefully touch the test strip to the blood and wait for a blood glucose reading to appear on the screen. When used and stored properly, blood glucose meters are generally accurate in how they measure glucose. They differ in the type and number of features they offer. Here are several factors to consider when choosing a blood glucose meter: Insurance coverage. Check with your insurance provider for coverage details. Some insurance providers limit coverage to specific models or limit the total number of test strips allowed. Cost. Meters vary in price. Be sure to factor in the cost of test strips. Ease of use and maintenance. Some meters are easier to use than others. Are both the meter and test strips comfortable and easy to hold? Can you easily see the numbers on the screen? How e Continue reading >>

Choosing A Glucose Meter

Choosing A Glucose Meter

The blood glucose meter has been around now for more than three decades, helping people with diabetes monitor blood sugar, also known as blood glucose. A glucose meter will help you to keep track of your glucose levels and help your doctor determine which types of medications would be the most beneficial for you in managing your diabetes. Glucose Meters: Who Benefits? Although all people with diabetes can benefit from using a glucose meter, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you regularly monitor blood sugar if: You take diabetes pills or insulin. You are on an intensive insulin program. You are pregnant. You have a difficult time controlling your blood sugar levels. You have experienced extreme low blood sugar levels or ketones from high blood sugar levels. You have a low blood glucose level, but don't have the typical symptoms. Glucose Meters: Available Types There are various types of blood glucose meters: Traditional meters give you a one-time snapshot of your blood glucose. Most people use a traditional glucose meter. These can include data management software that allows you to keep track of your blood glucose levels over time. The information can be charted and graphed and will help you and your physician to spot patterns, possibly making changes to your therapy or diet. But this added technology can also increase the price of a glucose meter. A well-kept log in a notebook can do the same job. Continuous glucose monitors provide readings every few minutes, 24 hours per day. This type of monitor does not involve pricking your finger, but instead uses a hair-thin probe inserted just under the skin in the upper arm area. Depending on the model, the probe works continuously for up to 5 to 7 days and is then changed. It reads the glucose level in the fl Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Meters

Best Blood Glucose Meters

If you use a blood glucose meters from one of the big four meter companies to check your level four times a day, you will probably pay anywhere from $1,700 to $2,300 each year. But if instead you test with a meter and strips from one of the “big box” stores, you would be out of pocket only about $600 to $800. This is a useful bit of information from the latest Consumer Reports review of the “Best Blood Glucose Meters.” The magazine rates 21 meters in a brief article of one chart and five paragraphs in less than a page in its November 2012 issue. The big box stores that sell some of the least expensive meters and test strips are Wal-Mart and Target. Wal-Mart has offered its ReliOn brand for years, but Target now offers its Up & Up brand. Still, the wide price gap may be misleading. Each of the big four — LifeScan, Roche, Bayer, and Abbott — offer programs that can provide some of us test strips for considerably less. Most people with diabetes will find the report, however brief, useful. It’s already on newsstands and, better yet, on the shelves of most libraries. What Consumer Reports says is important. Published by the nonprofit Consumers Union and containing no ads, this is one of our largest circulation magazines. Two years ago it had a circulation of 7.3 million copies, according to a review of the magazine in The Wall Street Journal. The magazine regularly reviews these meters, the most important tool that we have for managing our blood sugar. Four years ago I wrote here about its review of 13 meters from eight different manufacturers. Other magazines also review our meters, notably Diabetes Forecast.Their review this past January provides some useful information, but it makes a point of noting that, “Diabetes Forecast doesn’t test or recommend pro Continue reading >>

Meters: Does Your Device Measure Up?

Meters: Does Your Device Measure Up?

Download our latest printable product listings. Think of picking out a blood glucose meter the same way you would choose a car. You might consider cost first and then compare features to narrow down your options until you find the one that works best for you. You may even be able to sit with a diabetes educator and look over a number of meters to get a feel for them, says Molly McElwee-Malloy, RN, CDE, CPT, patient care manager in diabetes education at the University of Virginia Health System and a spokeswoman for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. The main thing people think about is cost, she says. But I think you should [also] think about something that is really going to do the most work for you. If youre stumped by all of the features to consider, focus on five main factors: ease of use, size and shape, reimbursement, accuracy, and download ability. Meters are typically affordable (most are in the range of $10 to $50) and are often discounted or free with coupons. The real cost with testing your blood glucose comes with the strips, says McElwee-Malloy. Test strips retail for anywhere between less than 50cents and $2 a strip, depending on the technology, and that can get expensive if you check your blood glucose multiple times a day. The cost of diabetes has never been higher, says endocrinologist Timothy Bailey, MD, FACE, CPI, director of AMCR Institute in Escondido, California, and a clinical associate professor at the University of CaliforniaSan Diego School of Medicine. A good way to save? Call your insurance company to find out which meters and strips are preferred (typically listed on the companys formulary). The cost of preferred meters and test strips will be covered at the most benefit to you. You can still get a meter that is not preferred by Continue reading >>

More Comprehensive Training Materials Lead To Higher User Satisfaction With Blood Glucose Meters

More Comprehensive Training Materials Lead To Higher User Satisfaction With Blood Glucose Meters

WESTLAKE VILLAGE, Calif: 8 October 2015 — Training materials that are accessible and easy to understand contribute to an overall increase in satisfaction among adults or parents of children with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes who use a blood glucose meter, and satisfaction is significantly higher when they understand how to use their meter, according to the J.D. Power 2015 U.S. Blood Glucose Meter Satisfaction Study.SM The study measures customer satisfaction with blood glucose meters based on six factors (in order of importance): performance (26%); ease of use (24%); design (20%); features (19%); cost of test strips (6%); and training (5%). Satisfaction is calculated on a 1,000-point scale. Overall satisfaction with blood glucose meters has increased to 826 this year, up 3 points from 2014. For more information about the 2015 U.S. Blood Glucose Meter Satisfaction Study, visit Blood glucose meter training and training materials are important and have a significant impact on satisfaction when they are provided. Satisfaction with training is 823, up a significant 14 points from 2014 and 25 points from 2013. When users receive written training materials, overall satisfaction is 20 points higher than the industry average; 19 points higher when users receive online information; and 16 points higher when users view a demonstration video online. In contrast, when users do not receive any training materials, satisfaction declines by 17 points. Ensuring that users completely understand the written training materials is a key performance indicator, providing an 88-point lift in overall satisfaction when it is met. While written materials remain the most common training support provided, just 38 percent of meter users receive written materials, down from 43 percent in 2014. However, Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Importance Of Coding

Importance Of Coding

Information on coding, and how it applies to your diabetes. Bayer Diabetes Care was the first diabetes care provider to introduce 'no coding' meters and now has a range of blood glucose meters with No Coding technology. You can start using these meters right away, without worrying about coding. What is 'coding'? Regularly monitoring your blood glucose levels using a blood glucose meter is an essential part of managing your diabetes. Most blood glucose meters require 'manual coding' before use. Manual coding is the process of calibrating - or 'coding'- your blood glucose meter each time you start using a new box of test strips. You may have to enter a code number into the meter, or insert a code strip or chip into the meter. This ensures that the meter is reading the test strips - and your blood glucose levels - correctly. What does coding mean to me? It is important to correctly code a meter that requires manual coding. If you forget to code your meter, or make a mistake when coding, the meter may give you inaccurate blood glucose measurements. If you make changes in your diabetes treatment based on inaccurate results, you might be getting the wrong treatment. How common is miscoding? Incorrect coding is common even when training has been given. Studies have found that 1 in 6 people with diabetes (16%) miscode when using manually coded meters. A miscoded meter will continue to give inaccurate readings until it is recalibrated with the correct code. What happens if I use a miscoded meter? Miscoded meters can give incorrect blood glucose measurements and lead to miscalculations in treatment doses. This can lead to blood glucose levels that are too high or too low. Click here for more information on what happens when you have low blood glucose or high blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

How To Safely Use Glucose Meters And Test Strips For Diabetes

How To Safely Use Glucose Meters And Test Strips For Diabetes

Subscribe: FDA Consumer Health Information Using a glucose meter to check and monitor blood sugar is a daily part of life for millions of Americans with diabetes. Glucose meters and test strips are medical devices regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. And the FDA wants to make sure you use these devices safely. Read on for advice. Beware of Buying Previously Owned Test Strips The FDA is aware that some sellers are marketing pre-owned or secondhand test strips to consumers. These are unused test strips previously owned by someone else. These pre-owned strips may be sold at lower prices when compared to new strips. For instance, you may see flyers advertising cheap test strips in your neighborhood, or you may see sellers marketing cheap test strips online. It is technically legal for people to resell their test strips. But the FDA does not recommend that you buy pre-owned test strips or that you resell your unused strips. That’s because pre-owned strips can give incorrect results—and may not be safe to use with your device. Here’s why: Test strips should be properly stored to give accurate results. If you buy pre-owned strips, it is hard to know whether the strips were stored properly. Test strips also could be expired. A lack of proper storage or using expired strips could put you at risk for getting incorrect results from your glucose meter. And incorrect results can put you at risk for serious health complications—and even death. Test strip vials that have been opened by another person may have small amounts of blood on them, which can put you at risk for infection. Pre-owned test strip vials may have been tampered with, which means that they may not be safe to use. (For instance, the expiration dates might have been changed or covered up.) Pre-ow Continue reading >>

Accuracy Of Blood Glucose Meters: Get The Down Low

Accuracy Of Blood Glucose Meters: Get The Down Low

Every blood glucose meter claims that its accurate. But what does accurate really mean in terms of blood glucose (BG)? A. Does accurate mean that your blood glucose meter will show you the true BG? B. Does accurate mean that your blood glucose meter will show the same BG each time if you test multiple times from the same finger stick? C. Does accurate mean that your blood glucose meter will show the same BG as a different blood glucose meter if you test from the same finger stick? No at-home blood glucose meter will show a true BG only a lab test can do that. (And actually, to be very technically correct, there is theoretically a true BG value, but its impossible to measure thats where statistics come in!) We can only estimate what the true BG value is by taking a sample. In order to be considered accurate and thus approved for use in at-home testing scenarios, the FDA requires that blood glucose meters provide: 99% of blood glucose measurements within 20% of lab results 95% of blood glucose measurements within 15% of lab results This literally translates to: if your true BG value (measured in a lab test) was 100 mg/dL, your blood glucose meter could show as low as 80 mg/dL or as high as 120 mg/dL, and the FDA would consider either number accurate because both 80 mg/dL and 120 mg/dL are results that fall within that 20% range of lab results. This is called variance (or the amount of measurement error that the FDA allows in order to consider the reading accurate) and the variance gets larger as your true BG gets larger. For example, if your true BG value (again, measured in a lab) was 400 mg/dL, your blood glucose meter could show as low as 320 mg/dL or as high as 480 mg/dL. Even with that 160-point spread, the FDA would still consider either number (and all numbers in Continue reading >>

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