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Unstable Blood Sugar Levels Symptoms

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

If you are one of the millions of people who has prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). (1) Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. (2) What can you do to help avoid dangerous blood sugar swings and lower diabetes symptoms? As you’ll learn, normal blood sugar levels are sustained through a combination of eating a balanced, low-processed diet, getting regular exercise and managing the body’s most important hormones in othe Continue reading >>

Severely Fluctuating Blood Glucose Levels Associated With A Somatostatin-producing Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumor

Severely Fluctuating Blood Glucose Levels Associated With A Somatostatin-producing Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumor

A 68-yr-old nondiabetic woman with an ovarian tumor was suffering from hyper- and hypoglycemia. Based on the results of an oral glucose tolerance test and continuous glucose monitoring, we speculated that the fluctuating blood glucose level was accompanied not only by a low insulin level but also by low counter-regulatory hormones levels, and that those broad hormonal suppressions were caused by a high somatostatin level produced in the ovarian tumor. We performed an oophorectomy and assessed the pathology of the tumor and changes in the blood glucose profile as well as hormonal levels postoperatively. The blood glucose level was completely normalized after the oophorectomy. Insulin secretion was also normalized. Histological examination showed that the tumor comprised a mature cystic teratoma and a stromal carcinoid. Immunohistochemically, the stromal carcinoid component was positive for somatostatin. The somatostatin level was 8505 pmol/liter preoperatively, which dropped down to 71.5 pmol/liter postoperatively. We found two previous reports of somatostatin-producing ovarian neuroendocrine tumors. Somatostatin levels among cases of ovarian origin were much higher than those among cases of gastrointestinal origins, and cases of ovarian origin all experienced blood glucose fluctuations. A 14-yr-old girl presented with left hip pain showing bilateral metaphyseal bone collapse accompanied with posterior-inferior displacement of capital femoral epiphyses after 2.5 yr of GH treatment. Blood chemistry, showing high levels of alkaline phosphatase and PTH, and a transiliac bone biopsy, indicating severe osteomalacia with osteitis fibrosa, along with serial computed tomography images of the hips from the presymptomatic stage, led to accurate diagnosis and successful treatment b Continue reading >>

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

Upswing: Caffeine Your blood sugar can rise after you have coffee -- even black coffee with no calories -- thanks to the caffeine. The same goes for black tea, green tea, and energy drinks. Each person with diabetes reacts to foods and drinks differently, so it's best to keep track of your own responses. Ironically, other compounds in coffee may help prevent type 2 diabetes in healthy people. Many of these will raise your blood sugar levels. Why? They can still have plenty of carbs from starches. Check the total carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts label before you dig in. You should also pay attention to sugar alcohols such as sorbitol and xylitol. They add sweetness with fewer carbs than sugar (sucrose), but they may still have enough to boost your levels. One study found that people with type 2 diabetes who switched to a vegan (or all vegetable-based) diet had better blood sugar control and needed less insulin. A boost in fiber from whole grains and beans might play a role, by slowing down the digestion of carbs. But scientists need more research to know if going vegan really helps diabetes. Talk to your doctor before you make major diet changes. Blood sugar can dip dangerously low during shut-eye for some people with diabetes, especially if they take insulin. It's best to check your levels at bedtime and when you wake up. A snack before bed may help. For some people, blood sugar can rise in the morning -- even before breakfast -- due to changes in hormones or a drop in insulin. Regular testing is important. One option is a continuous blood glucose monitor, which can alert you to highs and lows. Physical activity is a great health booster for everyone. But people with diabetes should tailor it to what they need. When you work out hard enough to sweat and raise your h Continue reading >>

Why Does High (or Low) Blood Sugar Give Me Headaches?

Why Does High (or Low) Blood Sugar Give Me Headaches?

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. Headaches can be debilitating, and patients with diabetes can get headaches from blood sugars dropping too low or climbing too high. As if we didn’t have enough to think about, right? There are many factors that can trigger headaches or even migraines, and blood sugar fluctuations are just one of those factors. The key to avoiding blood sugar-related headaches is keeping blood sugars from spiking or dropping too rapidly. For example, when you are treating a low blood sugar, don’t go on a high carbohydrate-eating binge, even though you may be ravenous. Eat a sensible meal with some protein as directed by your healthcare provider. When blood sugar is too low One of the suspected causes of low blood sugar-caused headaches has to do with the blood vessels in your brain. Your brain needs a readily available supply of glucose in order to function properly. If the brain senses it does not have enough sugar, blood vessels in the brain can spasm, triggering a headache. In the fasting state, stress hormones are also released which can cause vasoconstriction leading to headache. There is also a type of headache that can be seen in patients with diabetes that experience frequent low blood sugars, which are followed by rebound high blood sugars. This rebound phenomenon is often due to hormones that the body releases in response to a low blood sugar in an attempt to regulate itself. When blood sugar is too high High blood sugars can cause l Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Chapter 6 HYPOGLYCEMIA What is hypoglycemia and what causes it? In a society where sugar is consumed at alarming rates, some people find out from blood analysis that their blood sugar or glucose is low, that is, in medical terms, they are "hypoglycemic" ('hypo' refers to low and 'glycemia' means sugar). People that suffer from too much sugar in the blood are referred to as being "hyperglycemic" or using the more common terms, are prediabetic or diabetic. There needs to be a certain level of sugar in the blood for normal body functioning. The body regulates this sugar level by the secretion of regulating hormones one of which is insulin produced by the pancreas. As the level of insulin rises, the blood sugar level falls. Less insulin results in increased blood sugar levels. For most people, this insulin level fluctuation is a normal process but when the pancreas acts abnormally, problems develop. Although hypoglycemia can be caused by many complex factors such as emotional and physical stresses, large amounts of alcohol consumed on a daily basis, coffee, smoking, nutritional and enzyme deficiencies, and many other medical conditions, the large consumption of refined carbohydrates, (especially sugars) in the diet, allergies and hypothyroidism (low functioning thyroid gland) are among the most common factors leading to hypoglycemia. When refined sugar (sucrose) is ingested, a large percentage of it is immediately absorbed into the blood putting a strain on the pancreas to secrete insulin in abnormal amounts. Sugar consumption requires chromium which helps the pancreas and body cells regulate sugar levels. Excess sugars deplete our chromium and B Vitamin reserves. Caffeine, alcohol, tobacco, and stress further weakens the pancreas. Constant abuse of the pancreas can cause i Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

Blood sugar concentrations or blood glucose levels are the amount of sugar or glucose present in your blood stream. Your body naturally regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels as a part your body”s metabolic processes. Glucose or sugar is the primary energy mechanism for cells and blood lipids. Glucose or blood sugar is transported from your intestines or liver to the cells in your body via the bloodstream. The absorption of glucose is promoted by insulin or the hormone produced in the pancreas. If your sugar levels are not balanced you may have high or low blood sugar issues. Low sugar issues are hypoglycemia and high blood sugar indicates that you have hyperglycemia or hyperglycemia symptoms. High or low blood sugar levels cause different problems. Low blood sugar levels can cause dementia, comas or death. High blood sugar is a major cause of damage to your body”s internal organs. Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar or hypoglycemia indicates the level of glucose in your blood has dramatically dropped below what your body need to function. When your blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter symptom will develop. You may feel tired and anxious or weak and shaky. Your heart rate may be rapid and you feel as if you are having a heart attack. Eating something sugary will bring your sugar levels back to normal almost immediately and symptoms will subside. Sugar levels that are below 40 mg/dL cause you to have behavior changes. You may feel very irritable and become weak and confused. You may not realize you need to eat to raise your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels below 20 mg/dL will most certainly cause a loss of consciousness or perhaps you will experience seizures. You will need medical care immediately. Hypoglycemia symptoms happen very quickly. If you a Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

A healthy dog has a blood glucose level ranging from 75 mg to 120 mg. A dog is diagnosed with high blood sugar, or as hyperglycemic, when it exhibits high blood glucose, or sugar above the normal range. Elevated blood sugar may be temporary, stress-induced, or a sign of a serious underlying disease such as pancreatitis or diabetes mellitus. High blood sugar is more common in female than male dogs, and is more likely to occur in older dogs. Elevated blood glucose can occur transiently fairly often for various reasons (diet, stress, exertion, medications). Moderately elevated glucose can indicate infections (dental, kidneys, bladder), inflammatory conditions (pancreatitis) and hormonal imbalances (Hyperadrenocorticism). However persistent high glucose levels in the blood is diagnostic of Diabetes Mellitus. High blood Sugar causes increased thirst and urination. See a veterinarian promptly if your dogs shows these symptoms. The warning signs for high blood sugar are varied. If your dog’s high blood sugar is temporary or the result of stress or medication, you may not see any symptoms. However, if it is the result of a serious disease, you will likely see some of the following: Wounds not healing; infections worsening Depression Enlarged liver Urinary tract or kidney infection Bloodshot eyes Cataracts Extreme fluctuation in weight, gaining or losing Obesity Hyperactivity Excessive thirst or hunger Increased frequency of urination High blood sugar can indicate one of the following issues: Diabetes mellitus, caused by a loss of pancreatic beta cells, which leads to decreased production of insulin, rending the dog unable to process sugar sufficiently. Pancreatitis, inflammation of the pancreas, which can damage insulin-producing cells, inhibiting the dog’s ability to proce Continue reading >>

Tips For Managing Glucose Levels

Tips For Managing Glucose Levels

Upswing: Caffeine There are many different ways blood sugar (glucose levels in the blood) can be affected and cause problems with sugar control in people with diabetes. Each person reacts differently to various items that influence blood sugars. There are some compounds individuals with diabetes may want to examine to see how they influence their own blood sugar levels. For example, blood sugar levels can rise after drinking coffee, black tea, and some energy drinks due to the presence of caffeine. There are other compounds that may alter blood glucose levels and methods people with diabetes can use to see what compounds and actions influence their own blood sugar levels. Upswing: Sugar-Free Foods A number of foods claim to be "sugar-free," but these foods raise blood sugar levels because many of them contain carbohydrates in starches, fats, and even fiber. Sugar alcohols such as sorbitol and xylitol add sweetness to foods but still may have enough associated carbohydrates to raise blood sugar levels. Foods with high levels of carbohydrates are likely to raise blood sugar levels very high, and eventually may cause organ damage over time in people with diabetes. Upswing: Chinese Food Foods high in fat can cause blood sugar to stay higher for longer periods of time. Pizza, French fries, and most fried foods are high in carbohydrates and fat. It's a good idea to check your blood sugar about two hours after you eat such foods to see how your blood sugar levels are affected. Upswing: A Bad Cold Dehydration can elevate your blood sugar so it is wise to stay well hydrated. If you are sick, diarrhea and vomiting for more than two hours, or illness longer than a few days may alter your blood sugar. Moreover, blood sugar rises as your body tries to fight any type of illness. Medi Continue reading >>

Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose Level

Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose Level

Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level: Risk for variation of blood glucose/sugar levels from the normal range. There are different kinds of sugars. “Glucose” is what our body utilizes most. Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies and use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. Serum glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to body cells via the bloodstream and is made available for cell absorption via the hormone insulin, produced by the body primarily in the pancreas. Insulin is secreted by the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas in response to elevated level of blood glucose. This pancreatic hormone facilitates the movement of glucose across the cell membranes to be used for metabolic activity. The alpha cells of the islets of Langerhans secrete glucagon when blood glucose levels are low. Download PDF To View PDF, Download Here DocToPDF Hyperglycemia or elevated blood glucose levels may occur in a variety of clinical situations. Diabetes mellitus is the most common disorder associated with elevated blood glucose levels. Certain drugs have hyperglycemia as a side effect. Hypoglycemia, otherwise, occurs most often as the result of excess insulin administration in the person with diabetes mellitus. It may also occur to a person who has excessive alcohol intake, prolonged fasting and starvation states, adrenal insufficiency, and eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa. Low blood glucose levels after meals may be linked to gastric bypass surgery or excess consumption of refined carbohydrates and is the result of increased insulin production. An important part of managing blood glucose levels, as well as the ov Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Effects And Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Levels

Effects And Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Levels

One of the side effects of diabetes suffered by many individuals is low blood sugar. In the case of diabetes the body is not able to process blood sugar or glucose which subsequently damages bodily systems and organs. The treatment for low glucose levels is to use oral hypoglycemic or injectable insulin which assists the body in producing energy by drawing glucose into the cellular system. The insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications require that the individual have a enough blood sugar upon which it will work. In some cases an individual will also have a condition that is known as “brittle” or hard to control diabetes. These individuals find that they have problems with low blood sugar and high blood sugar which happened during both the daytime and night time. Low Blood Sugar Definition Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is the medical term used to describe when blood sugar falls below what the body requires to stay alive. The normal blood sugar range level is between 70 and 99 mg/dL Low blood sugar is defined when the level, measured in mg/dL, falls below 65. When it falls very low, such as below 20, it is considered a dangerous blood sugar level; individuals can get confused, drowsy and even lose consciousness. The blood sugar levels are necessary in order to maintain significant brain activity. If this blood sugar drops during pregnancy it can permanently harmed the baby. Individuals who do not suffer from brittle diabetes can produce low blood sugar by taking too much insulin, not eating enough food, exercise when it wasn’t planned for, drinking too much alcohol or exercising and not eating. Each of these situations causes an environment in the body in which the amount of blood sugar drops and there continues to be insulin present that works on the remaining b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Common symptoms of low blood sugar are: Feeling dizzy, shaky, or lightheaded Feeling nervous or anxious Having a fast heart beat Sweating Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar And Panic Attacks: How Are They Related?

Low Blood Sugar And Panic Attacks: How Are They Related?

Then, your heart starts beating faster, and you feel the need to sit down. Or sleep. Or vomit. You know your body is pleading for something — but what does it want? What does it need? You continue to wonder as your body begins to sweat. These symptoms worry you, of course. “Is this a panic attack?” you ask yourself. After all, you’ve experience severe anxiety before. You know these uncomfortable sensations. You know that a racing heart and a woozy head usually signify an intense head-on collision with panic is just around the corner. Or is something else amiss? HYPOGLYCEMIA: IMITATING PANIC ATTACKS SINCE…WELL, ALWAYS The word “hypoglycemia” is just a fancypants way of saying “low blood sugar” or “low blood glucose”. And according to Edmund Bourne’s The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook, hypoglycemia’s main symptoms (light-headedness, trembling, feelings of unsteadiness) overlap with the symptoms of panic. And I can certainly vouch for that. As both a panicker and someone who sees regular dips in blood sugar, the overlap is uncanny. Well, that spells trouble, doesn’t it? So…when you’re feeling unwell, how can you differentiate between panic and low blood sugar? How can you know that what you’re feeling is “just” a bout of low blood sugar that’ll disappear with a glass of OJ and a decent meal? Unless you have a glucose meter, you sort of…can’t. (Although, for the record, they’re not too expensive — I bought one from CVS when it was on sale for $10. Test strips are another story, though.) But you can calm your nerves a bit by learning about hypoglycemia, its causes, and ways to prevent it. LOW BLOOD SUGAR: WHAT PANICKERS NEED TO KNOW Bourne goes on for a few pages about hypoglycemia and its relationship with anxiety, but I’ve pic Continue reading >>

Reasons For Unstable Blood Glucose Levels: Getting Off The Glucose Merry-go-round

Reasons For Unstable Blood Glucose Levels: Getting Off The Glucose Merry-go-round

When you're diabetic, it sometimes seems as if your blood glucose levels spiral from one extreme to another, hypo or hyper and never finding the mid-ground. Here, we explore why that could be and find out how you can get off the glucose merry-go-round. If you're living with Diabetes, sometimes it can seem as if your blood glucose levels are on a constant white-knuckle ride, one minute rising to dizzying heights before lurching to terrifying lows. You already know that it's important to eat and exercise sensibly, but what happens when you are following your doctor's advice and are still seeing wild fluctuations? Here, we explore the reasons behind your unstable blood glucose levels and find out how you can get yourself on a more even keel. But why does it really matter? If your blood glucose (sugar) levels are unstable, you are more likely to experience complications. Complications of diabetes may be managed initially, including bouts of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar), but will usually get worse over time, leading to eye problems (including blindness), kidney problems, nerve pain, and foot problems that may eventually lead to amputation. The better your blood glucose control, the less likely you are to have these serious complications. So, how can you keep those levels stable, to prevent those serious problems? And what are the surprising causes of unstable blood glucose levels. Surprising Reason: Artificial Sweeteners A 2013 study by Pepino and colleagues found that when seventeen patients with type 2, insulin-resistant Diabetes were given the artificial sweetener Sucralose (Splenda), their blood glucose levels peaked at a higher point than those who drank water. Registered Nurse, Patty Bonsignore says: "If you drink a lot of diet Continue reading >>

What You Can Do To Stop The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster

What You Can Do To Stop The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster

If you find that your blood sugars often fluctuate from too high to too low (and vice versa), you’re on the blood sugar rollercoaster. To learn how to eliminate the extremes, you’ll have to do a little sleuthing on your own. Get out your blood glucose meter, and for a week try testing before and after a variety of meals, activities, and destressors to figure out what’s making it go up and down to stop it for good! Your blood sugars are affected by a large number of things, including what you ate (especially refined “white” carbohydrates), how long ago you ate, your starting blood glucose level, physical activity, mental stress, illness, sleep patterns, and more. If you take insulin and use it to treat highs, you can easily end up overcompensating and developing low blood sugars. If you develop a low, it’s easy to overeat and end up high again. Large fluctuations in blood sugars may make you feel cruddy and are bad for your long-term health, so it’s time to learn how to stop the rollercoaster! Physical Activity Effects: During this week, your goal is to do at least 30 minutes of physical activity on three days at varying times of day, and check and record your blood glucose levels before and after the activity. Physical Activity Trial #1: For this first activity, pick one that you normally do (like walking or cycling) and try to do it at your usual time of day. Check and record your blood sugar immediately before starting and within an hour of completing the 30 minutes of activity. You will find that your body responds differently to varying types of physical activities, particularly when the time of day varies as well. If you exercise first thing in the morning (before breakfast and medications), it is not unusual to experience a modest increase in blood s Continue reading >>

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