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Type 2 Diabetes Hypoglycemia Or Hyperglycemia

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hyperglycemia

Diabetes And Hyperglycemia

Tweet Hyperglycemia occurs when people with diabetes have too much sugar in their bloodstream. Hyperglycemia should not be confused with hypoglycemia, which is when blood sugar levels go too low. You should aim to avoid spending long periods of time with high blood glucose levels. What is hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia, the term for expressing high blood sugar, has been defined by the World Health Organisation as: Blood glucose levels greater than 7.0 mmol/L (126 mg/dl) when fasting Blood glucose levels greater than 11.0 mmol/L (200 mg/dl) 2 hours after meals Although blood sugar levels exceeding 7 mmol/L for extended periods of time can start to cause damage to internal organs, symptoms may not develop until blood glucose levels exceed 11 mmol/L. What causes hyperglycemia? The underlying cause of hyperglycemia will usually be from loss of insulin producing cells in the pancreas or if the body develops resistance to insulin. More immediate reasons for hyperglycemia include: Missing a dose of diabetic medication, tablets or insulin Eating more carbohydrates than your body and/or medication can manage Being mentally or emotionally stressed (injury, surgery or anxiety) Contracting an infection What are the symptoms of hyperglycemia? The main 3 symptoms of high blood sugar levels are increased urination, increased thirst and increased hunger. High blood sugar levels can also contribute to the following symptoms: Regular/above-average urination Weakness or feeling tired Increased thirst Vision blurring Is hyperglycemia serious? Hyperglycemia can be serious if: Blood glucose levels stay high for extended periods of time - this can lead to the development of long term complications Blood glucose levels rise dangerously high - this can lead to short term complications In the shor Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia, sometimes called a hypo or low, is a condition that occurs when a person’s blood glucose level (BGL) has dropped too low, below 4mmol/L. It is important to treat a hypo quickly to stop the BGL from falling even lower and the person becoming seriously unwell. Hypoglycaemia can make it hard to concentrate and carry out everyday activities. Some activities, such as driving and operating machinery, are not safe if BGLs are less than 5.0mmol/L. Hypoglycaemia is much more common in people who take insulin or certain other glucose lowering tablets, however it can occur in people with diabetes who are not using insulin. Hypoglycaemia can be caused by one or a number of events, such as: Too much insulin or other glucose lowering diabetes tablets Delaying or missing a meal Not eating enough carbohydrate Unplanned physical activity* More strenuous exercise than usual* Drinking alcohol - the risk of hypoglycaemia increases, the more alcohol you drink *Hypoglycaemia may be delayed for 12 hours or more after exercise Symptoms of hypoglycaemia vary from person to person. Early signs and symptoms may include: Shaking, trembling or weakness Sweating Paleness Hunger Light headedness Headache Dizziness Pins and needles around mouth Mood change If the BGL continues to drop, more serious signs and symptoms may occur. Later signs and symptoms of hypoglycaemia may include: Lack of concentration/ behaviour change Confusion Slurred speech Not able to treat own hypo Not able to drink or swallow Not able to follow instructions Loss of consciousness Fitting/seizures Hypoglycaemia can be classified as mild or severe. A mild hypo occurs when a person can treat their own hypo. A severe hypo occurs when a person needs help from someone else to treat their hypo. What should I do if I s Continue reading >>

Kansas Department Of Health And Environment: Diabetes Information

Kansas Department Of Health And Environment: Diabetes Information

OGTT-Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (after 2 hours) Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce insulin and is, therefore, unable to provide the cells with the glucose they need to generate energy. Type 1 diabetes, formerly known as juvenile onset diabetes, typically occurs in children and young adults. About 5-10% of diagnosed diabetics are type 1. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin, does not use insulin properly, or has insufficient insulin production. Typically, type 2 diabetes is seen in adults, however, because overweight and obesity rates are increasing in children and adolescents this type of diabetes is being diagnosed more frequently in younger people. A majority of diagnosed diabetics have type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 4% of pregnant women, and is present only during pregnancy. Blood sugars will generally return to normal after the birth of the child. However, women who have had gestational diabetes are at increased risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is characterized by having fasting blood glucose levels between 100-125 mg/dl, or an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between 140-199 mg/dl. The body still reacts to insulin, but not as efficiently as it should. The likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes is very high. Approximately 41 million Americans have pre-diabetes. To calculate your risk of having diabetes now, answer these questions. For each answer add the number of points in the appropriate column. High for having diabetes now. You should visit your health care provider to rule out the possibility of having diabetes. Low for having diabetes now. Keep your risk low by maintaining a healthy weight, engaging in physical activity, and not smoking. This test was adapted from Amer Continue reading >>

Can Low Blood Sugar Or High Blood Sugar Cause Nightmares?

Can Low Blood Sugar Or High Blood Sugar Cause Nightmares?

Both low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) can cause any of a list of reactions in the body. Among these are sleep disturbances, which may manifest as nightmares. Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia has many causes. We all require certain levels of glucose in our systems to maintain energy levels. For the non-diabetic, in the absence of certain disorders, this is generally not an issue, as the metabolic process automatically balances the levels of glucose and insulin in our bodies. For the diabetic, particularly one who is using insulin and/or other medications to manage their glucose levels, continuing balance might be more difficult to achieve. Some causes of hypoglycemia include an overdose of insulin; a dose of insulin combined with a skipped meal; a reaction to a combination of diabetic medications; exercise that isn’t factored into insulin dosing; or any of a number of other medical problems, including tumors and hormonal disorders. Once blood sugar drops below certain levels, the body releases epinephrine, signaling an emergency to the body. This in turn causes the symptoms experienced by those who have hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia does not only occur during the day. In fact, the onset of hypoglycemia during the nighttime hours is not at all uncommon. While it might be easy to spot the symptoms of a serious drop in blood sugar levels while awake (shakiness, sweating, confusion, blurred vision, tingling or numbness of the tongue or lips, lightheadedness or dizziness, among other symptoms), recognizing the problem during the night is more difficult, and potentially more critical. Nighttime onset of hypoglycemia can manifest as nightmares or crying out during sleep, excessive sweating, and confusion and irritability upon waking. It is critical to Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

LOW BLOOD SUGAR OVERVIEW Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, occurs when levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too low. Hypoglycemia is common in people with diabetes who take insulin and some (but not all) oral diabetes medications. WHY DO I GET LOW BLOOD SUGAR? Low blood sugar happens when a person with diabetes does one or more of the following: Takes too much insulin (or an oral diabetes medication that causes your body to secrete insulin) Does not eat enough food Exercises vigorously without eating a snack or decreasing the dose of insulin beforehand Waits too long between meals Drinks excessive alcohol, although even moderate alcohol use can increase the risk of hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes LOW BLOOD SUGAR SYMPTOMS The symptoms of low blood sugar vary from person to person, and can change over time. During the early stages low blood sugar, you may: Sweat Tremble Feel hungry Feel anxious If untreated, your symptoms can become more severe, and can include: Difficulty walking Weakness Difficulty seeing clearly Bizarre behavior or personality changes Confusion Unconsciousness or seizure When possible, you should confirm that you have low blood sugar by measuring your blood sugar level (see "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)"). Low blood sugar is generally defined as a blood sugar of 60 mg/dL (3.3 mmol/L) or less. Some people with diabetes develop symptoms of low blood sugar at slightly higher levels. If your blood sugar levels are high for long periods of time, you may have symptoms and feel poorly when your blood sugar is closer to 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Getting your blood sugar under better control can help to lower the blood sugar level when you begin to feel symptoms. Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes During Ramadan Is All About Smart Management And Making Healthy Choices. Some Interesting Information To Note:

Managing Diabetes During Ramadan Is All About Smart Management And Making Healthy Choices. Some Interesting Information To Note:

If you are planning to fast and you have diabetes, it is important to speak to your diabetes healthcare team as early as possible before Ramadan begins. For some people with diabetes, fasting can be dangerous. Your diabetes team will be able to advise you on whether it is safe for you to fast. If you are able to fast, they will advise you on how to manage your condition throughout the fasting period. Possible Complications of Fasting during Ramadan Fasting among patients with type 1 diabetes, and among those with type 2 diabetes who have inadequately managed blood glucose levels, is associated with multiple risks. Some of the major potential diabetes-related complications of fasting include dangerously low blood glucose (hypoglycemia), excessively high blood glucose (hyperglycemia), diabetic ketoacidosis and thrombosis (blood clots). Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia is the fall of blood sugar under the normal levels (less than 70mg/dl – 3.9mmol/l). Hyperglycemia is the rise of blood sugar above normal levels (above 200 mg/dl – 11.1 mmol/l) which may lead to diabetic Ketoacidosis in type 1 diabetes patients. Diabetic Ketoacidosis When the body’s cells don’t get enough glucose, it starts to burn fat for energy. When the body burns fat instead of glucose it causes waste products called ketones. Ketones can make the blood acidic and this can be dangerous. The risk for diabetic ketoacidosis may be further increased due to excessive reduction of insulin – based on the assumption that food intake is reduced during the month. Patients with type 1 diabetes who choose to fast during Ramadan are at a higher risk of developing ketoacidosis, especially if they have been experiencing hyperglycemia frequently before Ramadan. Dehydration and Thrombosis Fasting duri Continue reading >>

Halozyme Therapeutics - Halozyme's Ultrafast Insulin Accelerates Absorption And Lowers Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia Risk In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Halozyme Therapeutics - Halozyme's Ultrafast Insulin Accelerates Absorption And Lowers Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia Risk In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Halozyme's Ultrafast Insulin Accelerates Absorption and Lowers Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia Risk in Type 2 Diabetes Patients - More patients achieved postprandial glucose goal with lispro+PH20 combination compared to lispro alone - - Faster absorption of lispro+PH20 lowered hypoglycemic excursions and events compared to lispro alone - SAN DIEGO, June 27 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. (Nasdaq: HALO ) today announced Phase 2 results demonstrating that the subcutaneous coinjection of rHuPH20 (recombinant human hyaluronidase, PH20) with lispro significantly improves postprandial hyperglycemia, reduces hypoglycemia, and accelerates the absorption of mealtime insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes . Significantly more patients receiving lispro+PH20, 71% versus 48%, achieved the American Diabetes Association (ADA) goal of maintaining glucose below 180 mg/dL compared to lispro treatment alone, an indication of reduced hyperglycemia. Fewer patients required treatment for hypoglycemia and the mean minimum concentration for postprandial glucose was significantly higher for the lispro+PH20 combination compared to lispro alone. (Logo: ) Halozyme presented these results at the American Diabetes Association 70th Scientific Sessions today in Orlando, Fla. The results of this study confirm previously reported pharmacokinetic and glucodynamic findings in healthy volunteers and type 1 diabetes patients. "The new data from our Ultrafast Insulin development program provide further evidence that the combination of our rHuPH20 enzyme with insulin reduces glucose excursions through enhanced insulin absorption," stated Jonathan Lim, M.D., Halozyme's president and CEO. "Less hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia with a faster acting, best-in-class insulin product could lead Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Topic Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is most often seen in people who have diabetes that isn't well controlled. The symptoms of high blood sugar can be mild, moderate, or severe. Mild high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently higher than your target range (usually 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) to 350 mg/dL in adults and 200 mg/dL to 240 mg/dL in children), you may have mild symptoms of high blood sugar. You may urinate more than usual if you are drinking plenty of liquids. Some people who have diabetes may not notice any symptoms when their blood sugar level is in this range. The main symptoms of high blood sugar are: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Weight loss. Fatigue. Increased appetite. Young children are unable to recognize symptoms of high blood sugar. Parents need to do a home blood sugar test on their child whenever they suspect high blood sugar. If you don't drink enough liquids to replace the fluids lost from high blood sugar levels, you can become dehydrated. Young children can become dehydrated very quickly. Symptoms of dehydration include: A dry mouth and increased thirst. Warm, dry skin. Moderate to severe high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently high (usually above 350 mg/dL in adults and above 240 mg/dL in children), you may have moderate to severe symptoms of high blood sugar. These symptoms include: Blurred vision. Extreme thirst. Lightheadedness. Flushed, hot, dry skin. Restlessness, drowsiness, or difficulty waking up. If your body produces little or no insulin (people with type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2 diabetes), you also may have: Rapid, deep breathing. A fast heart rate and a weak pulse. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and/or vomiting. If your Continue reading >>

About Diabetes

About Diabetes

formerly known as Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM). characterized by hyperglycemia due to an absolute deficiency of the insulin hormone produced by the pancreas. patients require lifelong insulin injections for survival. usually develops in children and adolescents (although can occur later in life). may present with severe symptoms such as coma or ketoacidosis. patients are usually not obese with this type of diabetes, but obesity is not incompatible with the diagnosis. patients are at increased risk of developing microvascular and macrovascular complications. Etiology usually (but not always) caused by autoimmune destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas, with the presence of certain antibodies in blood. a complex disease caused by mutations in more than one gene, as well as by environmental factors. Symptoms increased urinary frequency (polyuria), thirst (polydipsia), hunger (polyphagia), and unexplained weight loss. numbness in extremities, pain in feet (disesthesias), fatigue, and blurred vision. recurrent or severe infections. loss of consciousness or severe nausea/vomiting (ketoacidosis) or coma. Ketoacidosis more common in T1D than in T2D. Diagnosis diagnosis is made by the presence of classic symptoms of hyperglycemia and an abnormal blood test. a plasma glucose concentration >=7 mmol/L (or 126 mg/dL) or >=11.1mmol/L ( or 200mg/dL) 2 hours after a 75g glucose drink. in a patient without classic symptoms, diagnosis can also be made by two abnormal blood tests on separate days. in most settings (although not always available in resource-poor countries), another test called HbA1C is done to approximate metabolic control over previous 2-3 months and to guide treatment decisions. Treatment overall aim of treatment is symptom relief and prevention or de Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia can occur when blood sugar levels are too high. People develop hyperglycemia if their diabetes is not treated properly. Hypoglycemia sets in when blood sugar levels are too low. It is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication. Diabetes is a metabolic disease with far-reaching health consequences. In type 2 diabetes, not enough insulin is released into the bloodstream, or the insulin cannot be used properly. In type 1 diabetes, the body only produces very little insulin, or none at all. We need insulin to live. Without it, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood because it cannot be taken out and used by the body. Very high blood sugar, known as hyperglycemia, leads to a number of symptoms. If blood sugar levels are too low, it is called hypoglycemia. When is blood sugar considered to be too high or too low? Slight fluctuations in blood sugar levels are completely normal and also happen on a daily basis in people who do not have diabetes. Between around 60 and 140 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) is considered to be healthy. This is equivalent to between 3.3 and 7.8 mmol/L. “Millimole per liter” (mmol/L) is the international unit for measuring blood sugar. It indicates the concentration of a certain substance per liter. If type 1 diabetes is left untreated, people’s blood sugar levels can get very high, even exceeding 27.8 mmol/L (500 mg/dL). Such high levels are rather uncommon for type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar concentrations below 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) are considered to be too low. As you can see in the illustration below, there are no clear-cut borders between the normal range of blood sugar and high and low blood sugar. Signs of hyperglycemia People with type 2 diabetes do not always realize that their Continue reading >>

Your First Vet Visit: Diagnosing Feline Diabetes

Your First Vet Visit: Diagnosing Feline Diabetes

Your first vet visit: diagnosing feline diabetes Your veterinarian can diagnose diabetes with a simple, in-office physical examination of the cat and laboratory tests, which will determine if there is an abnormally high level of sugar in the bloodstream and urine. Your veterinarian may ask if your cat has exhibited any of the following symptoms, indicating a possibility of feline diabetes: Increased thirst Sudden increase in appetite Sudden weight loss (despite an increase in appetite) Increased urination Increased lethargy Understanding your cat's diagnosis The food your cat eats is broken down into glucose during the digestion process. Glucose is the fuel that provides energy needed by the cells of the body to sustain life. As glucose enters the bloodstream, the cat's pancreas secretes insulin. Insulin is a hormone released in small amounts to properly balance the blood sugar (glucose) levels in the blood. Feline diabetes is similar to human diabetes, and occurs when your pet either doesn't produce or is unable to process insulin, a hormone that helps regulate glucose or sugar in the bloodstream. Just like humans, diabetic cats are diagnosed primarily with Type 2 diabetes.The types of diabetes in cats are based on the human classification system. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 form of diabetes is defined as an absolute insulin deficiency. In this form, the pancreas is not able to produce enough insulin to regulate the glucose in the bloodstream, leading to persistent high glucose levels in the blood. This type of diabetes is very rare in the cat. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes in cats, occurs when the cells in the cat's body don't respond to the insulin that is being provided. As a result, the cat becomes hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), wh Continue reading >>

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia is the medical term for a high blood sugar (glucose) level. It's a common problem for people with diabetes. It can affect people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as pregnant women with gestational diabetes. It can occasionally affect people who don't have diabetes, but usually only people who are seriously ill, such as those who have recently had a stroke or heart attack, or have a severe infection. Hyperglycaemia shouldn't be confused with hypoglycaemia, which is when a person's blood sugar level drops too low. This information focuses on hyperglycaemia in people with diabetes. Is hyperglycaemia serious? The aim of diabetes treatment is to keep blood sugar levels as near to normal as possible. But if you have diabetes, no matter how careful you are, you're likely to experience hyperglycaemia at some point. It's important to be able to recognise and treat hyperglycaemia, as it can lead to serious health problems if left untreated. Occasional mild episodes aren't usually a cause for concern and can be treated quite easily or may return to normal on their own. However, hyperglycaemia can be potentially dangerous if blood sugar levels become very high or stay high for long periods. Very high blood sugar levels can cause life-threatening complications, such as: diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) – a condition caused by the body needing to break down fat as a source of energy, which can lead to a diabetic coma; this tends to affect people with type 1 diabetes hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS) – severe dehydration caused by the body trying to get rid of excess sugar; this tends to affect people with type 2 diabetes Regularly having high blood sugar levels for long periods of time (over months or years) can result in permanent damage to parts Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

What Is Hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia may be described as an excess of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Your endocrine system regulates the amount of sugar that is stored and used for energy. It is important in brain cell function, and energy levels. Since the sugar that you consume in your diet is either used or stored, certain conditions and disorders may cause you to have difficulty processing and storing blood glucose, resulting in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. One hormone that is important to the normal storing and processing of sugar is insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is made in the pancreas that is responsible for maintaining "normal" blood sugar levels. If you have a problem with your pancreas, then you may have increased blood sugar levels. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels higher than these might indicate hyperglycemia. Causes of Hyperglycemia: Diabetes. About 90% of people with diabetes, have diabetes of adult onset (Diabetes type 2). You are more at risk for developing diabetes if you are older, extremely overweight (obese), if you have a family history of diabetes (parents, siblings), and if you are of African-American, Hispanic American, or Native-American heritage. People who have diabetes have an underproduction of the hormone, insulin, which lowers your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, you will have problems with elevated blood sugar levels. If you develop diabetes type 2, and you are an adult, your healthcare provider may prescribe medications in a pill form, which allow your body to process insulin that is needed for maintaining "normal" blood glucose levels. It is likely that your pancreas is producing enough insulin, but your body is resistant to the insulin, a Continue reading >>

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