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Type 2 Diabetes Dizzy Spells

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Some people who have type 2 diabetes may not have any symptoms early on. Many people with the disease don't even know they have it at first. But with time, diabetes starts to cause symptoms. High blood sugar Common symptoms of high blood sugar include: Being very thirsty. Urinating a lot. Having blurry vision. See more about symptoms of high blood sugar. The higher your blood sugar rises, the more likely you are to have symptoms. If you have higher-than-normal blood sugar and don't drink enough liquids, you can get dehydrated. This can make you feel dizzy and weak, and it can lead to an emergency called a hyperosmolar state. To learn what to do in an emergency, see When to Call a Doctor. Low blood sugar When your blood sugar is too low, it can also cause problems. And it can happen suddenly. Quickly treating low blood sugar can help you avoid passing out (losing consciousness). You can pass out when your blood sugar gets very low. Low blood sugar can also lead to a heart attack. Common symptoms of low blood sugar include: See more about symptoms of low blood sugar. If you aren't able to tell when your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemic unawareness), it's a good idea to test your blood sugar often. But you're not likely to get low blood sugar unless you take insulin or other diabetes medicines. To learn what to do in an emergency, see When to Call a Doctor. Know what your results mean Rhonda O'Brien, certified diabetes educator As important as regular testing is, you also need to know what the results mean and how to use them. "Look for patterns. If your blood sugar is always high before lunch, take a look at what you had for breakfast. Maybe you need to make some changes."-Rhonda This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims Continue reading >>

11 Warning Signs Of Pre-diabetes That You Need To Spot Early

11 Warning Signs Of Pre-diabetes That You Need To Spot Early

Pexels No one wants to get diabetes, but the disease doesn't just happen overnight. When your blood sugar is high, you're at risk for pre-diabetes, and if you don't adjust your lifestyle, you could eventually develop type-2 diabetes. There are a number of warning signs of pre-diabetes to look out for early on, and becoming aware of these symptoms can help you make the appropriate changes to help ward off diabetes and live as healthily as possible. "Pre-diabetes is a condition that indicates a patient’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes and its associated health complications," says Leah de Souza-Thomas, BSc MSc MPH over email. Among international organizations, there is no consensus on the definition of pre-diabetes, but most use blood glucose levels to determine risk. "In many people, there are no signs or symptoms associated with pre-diabetes and most people feel pretty normal as they progress from pre-diabetes to type 2 diabetes," says de Souza-Thomas. However, some indicators of pre-diabetes do exists, and they can often by subtle. One of these symptoms alone doesn't necessarily mean you have pre-diabetes, but if you have many of them together, you might want to go see a doctor. Here are 11 warning signs of pre-diabetes that you need to spot early. Fatigue Pexels Feeling extra tired lately? It may be a sign of pre-diabetes. "There are a number of reasons for excessive tiredness in pre-diabetics," says de Souza-Thomas. "These include the impact of dehydration and that the body’s energy requirements are not being met." Frequent Urination Pexels "Ordinarily when the kidneys filter the blood to make urine, they reabsorb all of the glucose and return it to the bloodstream," says de Souza-Thomas. "When a person's blood glucose levels are abnormally, high not all of t Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: The Hidden Health Timebomb

Prediabetes: The Hidden Health Timebomb

It is a “health timebomb” ticking away inside seven million people in Britain. It is a condition that can lead to serious illness, debilitation and even death. Yet prediabetes usually remains undetected – until it’s too late. So how worried should we be about this symptomless epidemic? Is it simply an inevitable precursor of full-blown diabetes, or a distinct condition in its own right? And what treatments are available to prevent prediabetes from developing into something much more serious? Prediabetes is a blood sugar disorder that can cause long-term damage to the heart and circulatory system. It also makes sufferers up to 15 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, which is irreversible and can lead to complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation and blindness. Fortunately if prediabetes is diagnosed early enough, the condition can be completely reversed, cutting the risk of major health problems by up to 60 per cent. Moreover, the treatment for prediabetes involves healthy lifestyle changes rather than any drugs regime. “People with abnormally high sugar levels have a much greater propensity to go on to develop diabetes, but that’s not a given,” says Professor Naveed Sattar, Professor of Metabolic Medicine at the University of Glasgow and an honorary consultant at the city’s Royal Infirmary hospital. “Factors like lifestyle, genetics and ethnicitity play a part, but obesity is a big driver; for someone who is susceptible to getting the disease, putting on excess weight can unleash that potential. Lose that weight however, and the risk goes back down again.” Ninety per cent of people diagnosed with prediabetes are overweight or obese. Excess fat, particularly round the midriff, hinders the regulation of blood sugar Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

What's Causing My Dizzy Spells?

What's Causing My Dizzy Spells?

At different times of the day (no regular pattern) I feel very lightheaded and very dizzy, like when you have had too much to drink. During these attacks I struggle to find my bearings. It's like I don't have enough oxygen. I am a fitness instructor so I would like to say that I am rather fit. Your advice would be appreciated. I would have liked to have known whether these feelings occur in any particular circumstances, such as if you are hungry, or just had something to eat, or when (and if) you feel anxious. Dizziness and lightheadedness can be one of the most difficult symptoms to pin down. Very often it is due to some form of tension or anxiety, and can occur particularly when the breathing gets disturbed, as can happen with acute anxiety. This is often accompanied by feelings of wanting to take deep breaths, but feeling you can't, and sometimes tingling feelings around the lips or in the fingers. Physical causes include a low blood sugar. This may occur after a meal or sweet drink, which initially boosts the blood sugar, then causes a release of insulin, after which there is overcompensation and the blood sugar goes too low. This is nothing to do with diabetes. You can usually determine if this is the case by taking a couple of glucose tablets or a sweet drink, which should abolish the symptoms quickly. A very rare cause is a condition where too much insulin is produced in short bursts from abnormal tissue in the pancreas (an insulinoma), which can produce feelings of disorientation and sometimes bizarre behaviour. Another rare cause would be a form of temporal lobe epilepsy. This may not result in fits, but can make the patient feel strange and disorientated. However I think the explanation of the symptoms you describe will not prove to be anything so serious as t Continue reading >>

Dizziness

Dizziness

A A A Dizziness What about dizziness during pregnancy? Dizziness caused by metabolic disorders When should I seek medical care for dizziness? How is dizziness diagnosed? Dizziness is a common description for many different feelings. Some people may refer to it as giddiness, or a "dizzy spell." Vertigo is similar to, but not the same as, dizziness, and it describes a spinning sensation of a person's surroundings, usually caused by head movement or positioning. Several diseases of the balance organs of the inner ear can cause vertigo, or it may be a symptom of a tumor or stroke. Causes of dizziness include medications (blood pressure and pain medications, and antibiotics), psychiatric conditions (anxiety, stress, and depression) other illnesses (allergies, sinus infections, . Signs and symptoms of dizziness include lightheadedness, feeling faint or passing out, spinning, whirling, or motion - either of themselves or of the surroundings, weakness, tiredness, confusion, feeling off balance, headache or head pressure, chest pain or tightness, nausea, or vomiting. Dizziness may be a symptom of a condition or disease that is something more dangerous and should always be discussed with a doctor. Medical treatment for dizziness depends on the underlying cause and should be evaluated by a medical professional. The prognosis for dizziness depends on the cause. Most causes of dizziness are harmless, and the problem goes away on its own. Sometimes dizziness will be the only symptom of serious disease, the course of which may be life-threatening or be easily treatable. Continue Reading A A A Dizziness (cont.) Dizziness is a common symptom during pregnancy. One of the reasons women feel dizziness during pregnancy is due to rising hormones that cause blood vessels to dilate, which incr Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Levels & Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Levels & Symptoms

It is important for people with diabetes to know the symptoms of high and low sugar levels so appropriate action can be taken to prevent health problems occurring in either the short or long term. In the case of low blood glucose levels, it is generally only people on certain medications such as insulin and tablets which directly stimulate insulin production that need to be actively aware of low blood sugar symptoms. Symptoms of high sugar levels (hyperglycemia) One or more of the following symptoms are common when blood glucose levels are too high: Increased urination Increased thirst Increased hunger Fatigue Dry mouth Dry eyes Blurred vision If sugar levels are regularly too high for a number of days or weeks, the following symptoms may also be recognised: Loss of weight, particularly muscle mass Regular urinary tract infections (UTIs) Regular episodes of thrush (yeast infections) Note that in people that are overweight, loss of weight may sometimes be more recognisable as a loss of muscle mass. High blood sugar can be uncomfortable and can increase the risk of developing long term complications if extended periods of hyperglycemia become a regular occurrence. Read more about hyperglycemia. Symptoms of low sugar levels (hypoglycemia) One or more of the following symptoms may be recognised if blood glucose levels become too low: Increased hunger Pale appearance Feeling weak Lethargy Faster heart rate Sweating Blurred vision Dizzy spells Reduced co-ordination Impaired ability to make decisions Hypoglycemia, or hypos for short, can be dangerous for people on the following anti-diabetic medications: Insulin Sulphonylureas Prandial glucose regulators (glinides) People with diabetes on these medications need to be able to spot the signs of low blood sugar levels quickly and Continue reading >>

Dizziness While Pregnant

Dizziness While Pregnant

Introduction Dizzy spells are a common symptom of pregnancy and often occur in the first trimester, but may continue until the third trimester. In fact, along with morning sickness and sore breasts, dizziness is often one of the first early signs of pregnancy. Generally, dizzy or shaky spells do not indicate a serious condition and are unharmful to mothers or babies. Dizziness comes in various form's, but the most common symptom is a feeling of moving or spinning while standing still. Sometimes this is accompanied by loss of balance and nausea without vomiting, similar to vertigo. An 'attack' can last for a few minutes, or up to several hours. What Causes Dizziness During Pregnancy? Hormone Changes Those pesky hormones again! Throughout pregnancy, high levels of progesterone cause blood vessels to relax. This has the effect of allowing extra blood to flow through the veins (in fact an increase of up to 50 percent), towards the developing embryo. At the same time, it slows the return of blood to the mother. Result? Reduced blood flow leads to reduced blood pressure, a common cause of temporary faintness. Blood Sugar A woman's metabolism changes during pregnancy and dizziness may be a direct consequence of fluctuating blood sugar levels. Women with types 1 or 2 diabetes are more susceptible than others. For those who are not diabetic, there is a 4 to 8 percent of risk of developing gestational diabetes, a condition where blood sugar levels are too high. This condition requires close medical attention, but fortunately in most cases, it disappears after birth. For more about caring for your baby in the formative months, see our prenatal care guide. Uterus Pressure By the second trimester, the expanding uterus can put pressure on surrounding blood vessels, causing dizziness. Continue reading >>

What Are The Causes Of Dizziness In Diabetics?

What Are The Causes Of Dizziness In Diabetics?

The American Diabetes Association and other health professionals are dedicated to the research and treatment of diabetes and associated conditions. They have found that the main reason diabetics experience dizziness is because of a lack of control of blood sugar and blood pressure levels. These levels need to be balanced and maintained. Video of the Day A medical doctor prescribes a certain amount of medication to many diabetic patients, to be taken at a certain time. Type 1 diabetics require insulin to maintain a proper blood sugar level; Type 2 diabetics may have to rely on oral medication. Medication instructions must be followed precisely. Variation may cause the blood sugar levels to be too high or too low. This is especially true of the Type 1 diabetic. Also, regular doctors visits are important. Blood sugar levels are checked and adjustments made to medication, if needed. Blood sugar levels must be checked at home as well. This is mandatory to keep the levels steady. The daily diet is also discussed during these appointments. Diet is just as essential as medication in controlling blood sugar levels, and for diabetics who do not need medication, diet is the source for controlling blood sugar levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetics with gastroparesis find it very difficult to control blood sugar levels. Gastroparesis is a condition in which the nerves in the stomach that aid digestion are impaired, leading to incomplete digestion, nausea, vomiting and pain. High blood pressure is common in diabetics because of shared causes of the diseases themselves, according to Dr. Patrick Lyden, professor of neuroscience and director of UC San Diego's Stroke Center. High blood pressure can cause dizziness, as can low blood pressure. Dr. Timothy Hain of Continue reading >>

Why Do I Get Dizzy Spells?

Why Do I Get Dizzy Spells?

Diabetes is a condition of having high blood sugar in one’s blood. When a person is found to have blood glucose level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two separate occasions, then he will be said to have diabetes Dear doctor: I carried out medical tests and I was found to be a diabetic with sugar levels of 121mg/dl. I went to a pharmacist friend who gave me tablets. But every time I take them I sweat, get dizzy, my heart races and I feel lifeless. Are the drugs causing me this trouble? —Farouk Dear Farouk: Diabetes is a condition of having high blood sugar in one’s blood. When a person is found to have blood glucose level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two separate occasions, then he will be said to have diabetes. In general, people who have blood sugar of 100-125 mg/dl usually have no symptoms of diabetes but are at risk of developing diabetes and have to minimise fats and increase physical activity to avoid or delay getting diabetic. Most prone to this disease are the obese, physically inactive, have a family history of diabetes, are Blacks, women who have given birth to babies of 4kg or higher, have high blood pressure or high blood fat. These people require regular monitoring of blood sugar. At 121mg/dl, you needed another fasting blood test instead of drugs. If you are given drugs by a pharmacist without a doctor’s prescription, it is self-prescription which may be dangerous to your health. It is likely that the drugs you were given are causing your blood sugar to be low which is dangerous and can cause death in minutes because the brain only uses sugar for the vast energy needs. In the meantime, stop taking the drugs and visit a doctor. Embark on physical exercise while minimising sugar and fat intake. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is gestational diabetes (GDM)? GDM is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, usually in the second or third trimester. GDM causes your blood sugar level to rise too high. This can harm you and your unborn baby. Blood sugar levels usually go back to normal after you give birth. What causes GDM? The cause of GDM is not known. The hormones made by the placenta may cause insulin resistance. Insulin helps move sugar out of the blood so it can be used for energy. Insulin resistance means your pancreas makes insulin, but your body cannot use it. As the placenta grows, more of these hormones are produced. The hormones block insulin and cause your blood sugar level to rise. What increases my risk for GDM? Lack of exercise A close family member with diabetes A history of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol Being overweight or obese Previous delivery of a large baby Glycosuria (sugar in your urine) or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Being African American, Latino, Native American, Asian American, or Pacific Islander heritage What are the signs and symptoms of GDM? More hunger or thirst than usual Frequent urination Blurred vision More fatigue (tired) than usual Frequent bladder, vaginal, or skin infections More weight gain than your healthcare provider suggests during your pregnancy Nausea or vomiting How is GDM diagnosed? An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Your healthcare provider may order either a one-step or two-step OGTT. One-step OGTT: Your blood sugar will be tested after you have not eaten for 8 hours (fasting). You will then be given a glucose drink. Your blood sugar will be tested again 1 hour and 2 hours after you finish the drink. Two-step OGTT: You Continue reading >>

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness is a symptom that is often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Vertigo is the sensation of spinning, while lightheadedness is typically described as near fainting, and weakness. Some of the conditions that may cause lightheadedness in a patient include low blood pressure, high blood pressure, dehydration, medications, postural or orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, endocrine disorders, hyperventilation, heart conditions, and vasovagal syncope. Vertigo is most often caused by a problem in the balance centers of the inner ear called the vestibular system and causes the sensation of the room spinning. It may be associated with vomiting. Symptoms often are made worse with position changes. Those with significant symptoms and vomiting may need intravenous medication and hospitalization. Vertigo is also the presenting symptom in patients with Meniere's Disease and acoustic neuroma, conditions that often require referral to an ENT specialist. Vertigo may also be a symptom of stroke. Most often, dizziness or lightheadedness is a temporary situation that resolves spontaneously without a specific diagnosis being made. Introduction to dizziness (feeling dizzy) Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms that will prompt a person to seek medical care. The term dizziness is sometimes difficult to understand since it means different things to different people. It is either the sensation of feeling lightheaded as if the individual is weak and will pass out, or it describes vertigo or the sensation of spinning, as if the affected person just got off a merry-go-round. Lightheadedness is often caused by a decrease in blood supply to the brain, while vertigo may be caused by disturbances of the inner ear and the balance centers of the brain. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Hypoglycemia

Diabetic Hypoglycemia

Print Overview For people with diabetes, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs when there's too much insulin and not enough sugar (glucose) in the blood. Hypoglycemia is defined as blood sugar below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.9 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Several factors can cause hypoglycemia in people with diabetes, including taking too much insulin or other diabetes medications, skipping a meal, or exercising harder than usual. Pay attention to early warning signs, so you can treat low blood sugar promptly. Treatment involves short-term solutions — such as taking glucose tablets — to raise your blood sugar into a normal range. Untreated, diabetic hypoglycemia can lead to seizures and loss of consciousness — a medical emergency. Rarely, it can be deadly. Tell family and friends what symptoms to look for and what to do in case you're not able to treat the condition yourself. Symptoms Early warning signs and symptoms Early signs and symptoms of diabetic hypoglycemia include: Shakiness Dizziness Sweating Hunger Irritability or moodiness Anxiety or nervousness Headache Nighttime symptoms Diabetic hypoglycemia can also occur while you sleep. Signs and symptoms, which can awaken you, include: Damp sheets or bedclothes due to perspiration Nightmares Tiredness, irritability or confusion upon waking Severe symptoms If diabetic hypoglycemia goes untreated, signs and symptoms of severe hypoglycemia can occur. These include: Clumsiness or jerky movements Muscle weakness Difficulty speaking or slurred speech Blurry or double vision Drowsiness Confusion Convulsions or seizures Unconsciousness Death Take your symptoms seriously. Diabetic hypoglycemia can increase the risk of serious — even deadly — accidents. Identifying and correcting the factors contrib Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

Have You Experienced Dizziness Related to Your Diabetes? Dizziness is not a pleasant feeling. It can strike unexpectedly anytime, anywhere, leaving you unable to carry on with everyday tasks. This lightheaded sensation is typically accompanied by a sudden flush of heat and often seems to occur at the most inconvenient time possible, which can be embarrassing. As awkward as sudden dizziness can be, you should always alert someone nearby to the fact that you have diabetes. Feeling lightheaded can be the first warning that your blood glucose levels are awry, and you want someone close knowing how to help you. What Causes Dizziness? There are many reasons why someone might feel dizzy, not all of them related to diabetes. Maybe the room is too hot, or the person feeling dizzy is overdressed or dehydrated. Sometimes certain medications, an ear infection or a migraine can cause dizziness. Stress can also bring on the room-spinning feeling or sensation you may faint. If dizziness often strikes after you sit or stand up suddenly, but goes away when you sit or lie down, it is probably due to postural hypertension (a sudden drop in blood pressure), which is quite common in older people. With dizziness caused by stress or heat, a cool glass of water or a bit of fresh air will help you recover completely within a very short time. Maybe a trip to your doctor is in order if you suspect your medication or an ear infection is to blame. But since there is a chance your body is using dizziness as an early warning system, you should always check your blood sugar levels if you self-test, or get them checked if dizzy spells become frequent if you don’t test your sugar levels with finger prick testing. Dizziness and Blood Glucose Levels As is often the case with fairly vague symptoms like d Continue reading >>

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

Talk around blood pressure typically centers on what to do if blood pressure is too high. We know that high blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes than people without diabetes. We also know that uncontrolled high blood pressure is a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and kidney disease. The American Diabetes Association recommends a blood pressure goal of less than 140/80 for most people with diabetes. But what if your blood pressure is too low? Is it cause for concern? And what do you do about it? Low blood pressure defined Low blood pressure is also known as “hypotension.” You might be thinking that low blood pressure is a good thing, especially if yours tends to run on the high side. But the reality is that low blood pressure can be a serious condition for some people. For people without diabetes, the American Heart Association recommends a blood pressure of less than 120 over 80 (written as 120/80). Low blood pressure is generally defined as a blood pressure of less than 90/60. If your blood pressure tends to hover in that area without any symptoms, then there’s likely no cause for concern. But if symptoms occur, that’s a signal that something is amiss. Symptoms of low blood pressure Low blood pressure may be a sign that there’s an underlying medical condition, especially if your blood pressure drops suddenly or if you have the following symptoms: • Dizziness or lightheadedness • Fainting • Fast or irregular heartbeat • Feeling weak • Feeling confused • Lack of concentration • Blurred vision • Cold, clammy skin • Nausea • Rapid, shallow breathing • Depression • Dehydration That’s quite a list. Some of the above symptoms can occur if you have, say, the flu, a stomach bug, or have been outside for a long time in h Continue reading >>

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