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Type 1 Diabetes Specialist Near Me

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Learn how ultra-athlete Maggie Crawford manages her type I diabetes. Comprehensive Diabetes Care At UC San Diego Health, we recognize the work that adults with type 1 diabetes and their families do every day to live with this disease. Our goal is to equip you with: Evidence-based therapies to live well with type 1 diabetes. The best tools to manage blood glucose, including insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors. Education on diabetes management tools and therapies. Accurate, up-to-date information on diabetes and its complications. Responsive and reliable advice for managing the highs and lows of life with type 1 diabetes. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system protects us from viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi. In autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn’s disease or multiple sclerosis, the immune system attacks the body’s own healthy cells. Insulin In type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas (beta cells). Insulin is necessary for survival. Without insulin, the body can’t make use of food energy by allowing blood glucose to pass into our bodies’ cells. When the beta cells are destroyed, food energy — in the form of blood glucose — stays in the blood, where it can damage the rest of the body. To stay alive, people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin, either by injection multiple times a day or through an insulin pump (like the one shown here). Symptoms Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2 diabetes, accounting for approximately 5 percent of people with diabetes in the United States. Type 1 diabetes is generally diagnosed in children, but can come on at any age. The warning signs are: Extreme thirst Frequent urination Exhaus Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Your Child’s Health Care Team

Type 1 Diabetes: Your Child’s Health Care Team

When you find out that your child has type 1 diabetes, there’s a lot of new information to take in, and changes to your family’s lifestyle. Your child’s heath care team will help you and your child learn how to make diabetes part of everyday life. The team may include: Your child’s regular pediatrician for general care A pediatric endocrinologist (a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating children with diabetes and other endocrine conditions) A certified diabetes educator A dietitian for advice on meals and snacks An optometrist or ophthalmologist to take care of your child’s eyes A mental health professional (usually a social worker or psychologist) More on each of those professionals below. They’ll be important as you and your child learn things like how to: Plan when and what to eat Know how physical activity will affect your child’s diabetes Although there isn’t a cure for type 1 diabetes, good control of the condition can let your child can lead a normal, active life. The health care team is there to help make that happen. Your son or daughter should continue to see a pediatrician for general health care: everything from illnesses that come up to vaccinations and routine checkups. The pediatrician will make sure that all parts of your child’s health care are managed and can also make referrals to other specialists. Pediatric endocrinologists have had special training to understand the specific medical and emotional needs of young children and teens, and can give them the best care. Your child’s pediatric endocrinologist will: Ask you questions about your child’s diet and exercise habits Ask you how comfortable you are with managing your child’s diabetes Check for any complications See how much insulin your child takes and how often Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Pediatric Diabetes And Endocrinology

Pediatric Diabetes And Endocrinology

Services for Adults UW Health endocrinologists, a group that includes our diabetes specialists in Madison, Wisconsin, provide services for patients with a wide variety of endocrine disorders, including juvenile diabetes. Our staff commonly evaluates and treats problems of the thyroid, adrenal and pituitary glands. Diabetes education, counseling and treatment, including the genetics of diabetes Evaluation and treatment of a wide range of endocrine gland conditions Thorough medical histories and preliminary examinations Comprehensive education regarding diagnosis, testing and all aspects of treatment Coordination of care between UW Health pediatric endocrinologists and your child's primary physician News Identification Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care

Diabetes Care

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by issues with the body’s use of insulin. There are differing types of diabetes, classified on how the body responds to insulin, such as failing to secrete enough insulin not responding appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Since insulin is needed by the body to convert glucose into energy, these failures result in abnormally high levels of glucose accumulating in the blood. Diabetes may be a result of other conditions such as genetic syndromes, chemicals, drugs, malnutrition, infections, viruses, or other illnesses. Detroit Medical Center can help you manage your diabetes. If you have diabetes, or think you may have diabetes, DMC can help you find a primary care physician who can help you diagnose, treat and monitor your condition. Diabetes is a life-threatening condition that, when properly managed, is easy to live with. For an appointment, a second opinion or more information, please call (888) DMC-2500. More About Diabetes For glucose to be able to move into the cells of the body, insulin must be present. Insulin is produced primarily in the pancreas, and is readily available to move glucose into the cells. This use of insulin is disrupted in persons with diabetes, making it difficult for their body to get energy. With diabetes, either the pancreas produces too little or no insulin or the cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, which the body passes into urine where it is eventually eliminated, leaving the body without its main source of fuel. The three main types of diabetes - type 1, type 2, and gestational - are all defined as metabolic disorders that affect the way the body metabolizes, or uses, digested food to make glucose, the main source of fuel for the bo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Endocrinology

Diabetes And Endocrinology

What is Diabetes? Diabetes mellitus (DM), or diabetes, as it is more commonly known, is a metabolic disease where blood sugar levels are elevated for prolonged periods of time. Diabetes is caused by the pancreas not producing enough insulin, or the body not responding properly to the insulin produce. Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination and increased thirst and hunger. If left untreated, diabetes can cause many serious complications. Long-term complications of the disease include heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, foot ulcers and damage to the eyes. There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 DM: Occurs in about five percent of diabetes patients. The body does not produce enough insulin. Type 2 DM: Is the most common form of diabetes. Unlike those with type 1 diabetes, the bodies of patients with type 2 can make insulin. However, their pancreas either does not make enough or the body cannot use it efficiently. This is also called insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes can be regulated and controlled with healthy diet, exercise and medication. Gestational diabetes: Occurs when a pregnant woman without a prior history of diabetes develops high blood glucose. Typically is it only present during the course of the pregnancy. What is Endocrinology? Endocrinology is a branch of medicine dealing with the endocrine system, its diseases and functions and the hormones related to it. The endocrine system is a collection of glands that secrete hormones directly into the circulatory system. The major endocrine glands include the pituitary gland, pancreas, ovaries, testes, thyroid, parathyroid, hypothalamus, gastrointestinal tract and adrenal glands. These glands control many hormonal functions of the body, including metabolism, growth and development, sleep, di Continue reading >>

The 20 Best U.s. Diabetes Hospitals

The 20 Best U.s. Diabetes Hospitals

U.S. News and World Report releases its 2014 rankings. We’ve included a map and link of each award-winning hospital that made the cut. Every year, the U.S News and World Report ranks U.S. hospitals for best practices. Editors rank the hospitals based on surveys from the American Hospital Association and other medical organizations, patient feedback, and medical outcomes. Earlier, the publication released its 2014 rankings for the best children’s hospitals for treating Type 1 diabetes. Now, it has released its rankings of the best overall diabetes and endocrinology programs. Above is a map of the Top 20, links to each hospital’s diabetes program below: 1) Mayo Clinic – Rochester, MN 2) Cleveland Clinic – Cleveland, OH 3) Massachusetts General Hospital – Boston, MA 4) Johns Hopkins Hospital – Baltimore, MD 5) UCSF Medical Center – San Francisco, CA 6) New York-Presbyterian University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell – New York, NY 7) Yale-New Haven Hospital – New Haven, CT 8) Northwestern Memorial Hospital – Chicago, IL 9) UCLA Medical Center – Los Angeles, CA 10) University of Washington Medical Center – Seattle, WA 11) Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian – Philadelphia, PA 12) Brigham and Women’s Hospital – Boston, MA 13) Florida Hospital Orlando – Orlando, FL 14) Cedars-Sinai Medical Center – Los Angeles, CA 15) Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University – St. Louis, MO 16) Beaumont Hospital – Grosse Pointe, MI 17) Mount Sinai Hospital – New York, NY 18) Froedtert Hospital and the Medical College of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, WI 19) Lancaster General Hospital – Lancaster, PA 20) University of Kansas Hospital – Kansas City, KS In the past, U.S. News and World Report has been criticized by some in di Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Doctors

The Best Diabetes Doctors

Diabetes impacts millions of Americans every year. As the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, diabetes is something to be concerned about. With that in mind, it's important to have top-quality, best diabetes doctors for you or your loved ones. At Castle Connolly, your search for top diabetes doctors can be simple. Doctors do not pay to appear on our lists. Through peer nomination, research, review and screening, we have comprised an extensive listing of the best Baltimore doctors. Included in the profiles is helpful information about the doctor such as education, training and special expertise. Locating the Best Doctors for Diabetes Follow these steps to find your doctor who specializes in diabetes. 1. Enter zip code or city and state 2. Type in Diabetes in the Disease/Condition field 3. Click on the Search Now button With Castle Connolly's advanced search option, you can conduct the most detailed search possible. This feature allows you to search by Name, Hospital, Area of Expertise and more-increasing the chances your search results will reveal the best diabetes doctors for you. This is a free initial search that will give you access to 20-25% of the total 51,900+ list, nationwide. To access the full list of doctors with a focus in women's health, sign up as a Premium Member now. Diabetes Doctor Background Checks Since diabetes is such a serious disease, you might want as much information about your narrowed-down list of doctors as possible. Castle Connolly can provide you with access to public medical board data, which displays the doctor's disciplinary record. Through these records, you can locate information in regards to a specific doctor's disciplinary and behavioral record. When you access this background check for top diabetes doctors, you will Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that affects a person's blood sugar levels and can require various treatments. Understanding which doctors help treat diabetes can simplify the process, making it less stressful. This article helps people with diabetes to understand the key differences between the various diabetes specialists. It also covers some common guidelines to follow for visiting each of these experts, to ensure you get the most out of your treatment. Which doctors help with treating diabetes? There are a number of diabetes specialists who may be involved in treating someone with this common condition. As each of these specialists has a slightly different role, there are some key things to be aware of before seeing each one. General care physicians A general care physician will often help in the treatment of people with diabetes. Regular check-ups will usually be carried out once every 3 to 4 months. If there is anything outside their area of expertise, a general care physician will frequently send an individual to an endocrinologist first of all. Endocrinologists The most common specialists in the field of diabetes are endocrinologists. Endocrinologists specialize in the glands of the body, and the hormones that are produced from those glands. The pancreas is a gland that comes under the spotlight when managing diabetes. It produces insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. In the case of people with diabetes, insulin is either not produced or does not work properly. People with type 1 diabetes are put under the care of an endocrinologist most of the time. People with type 2 diabetes, who have fluctuating blood sugar levels, will also need to see an endocrinologist. Visiting a doctor for diabetes When visiting a doctor about diabetes for the first time, it is important tha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment Center - Hamilton, Oh

Diabetes Treatment Center - Hamilton, Oh

Type of Physician: Endocrinologist What is a Endocrinologist? A subspecialty certification by the Board of Internal Medicine; practitioners treat disorders of the internal (endocrine) glands such as the thyroid and adrenal glands. Endocrinology also deals with disorders such as diabetes, metabolic and nutritional disorders, pituitary diseases, and menstrual and sexual problems. Specialty: Endocrinology Common Name: * Provider Directory Terms of Use: The WebMD 'Provider Directory' is provided by WebMD for use by the general public as a quick reference of information about Providers. The Provider Directory is not intended as a tool for verifying the credentials, qualifications, or abilities of any Provider contained therein. Inclusion in the Provider Directory does not imply recommendation or endorsement nor does omission in the Provider Directory imply WebMD disapproval. You are prohibited from using, downloading, republishing, selling, duplicating, or "scraping" for commercial or any other purpose whatsoever, the Provider Directory or any of the data listings or other information contained therein, in whole or in part, in any medium whatsoever. The Provider Directory is provided on an "AS-IS" basis. WebMD disclaims all warranties, either express or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for particular purpose. Without limiting the foregoing, WebMD does not warrant or represent that the Provider Directory or any part thereof is accurate or complete. You assume full responsibility for the communications with any Provider you contact through the Provider Directory. WebMD shall in no event be liable to you or to anyone for any decision made or action taken by you in the reliance on information provided in the Provider Dir Continue reading >>

Dr. A.i. Moryan Md, Facp. In Denton, Tx

Dr. A.i. Moryan Md, Facp. In Denton, Tx

An early diagnosis and implementation of aggressive treatment services can prolong the potentially devastating consequences of endocrine related diseases including diabetes, thyroid illnesses, obesity and more. Dr. A I Moryan is dedicated to providing quality and services for patients with these and other medical conditions. Dr. Moryan provides a comprehensive evaluation, diagnosis and regimen recommendations as well as ongoing access to diabetes education such as insulin pump therapy and continuous glucose monitoring. Dr. Moryan's comprehensive care is based on prevention, education and utilizing modern medical techniques to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Diabetes mellitus is a disease that prevents your body from properly using the energy from the food you eat. Diabetes occurs when either the pancreas (an organ behind your stomach) produces little insulin or no insulin at all. (Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreas that helps the body use sugar for energy.) The pancreas makes insulin, but the insulin made does not work as it should. This condition is called insulin resistance. Type 1 diabetes occurs because the insulin-producing cells (called beta cells) of the pancreas are damaged. People with Type 1 diabetes produce little or no insulin, so sugar cannot get into the body's cells for use as energy. This causes blood sugar levels to rise. People with Type 1 diabetes MUST use insulin injections to control their blood sugar. The damage to the insulin-producing cells in Type 1 diabetes occurs over a period of years. However, the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes might occur over a period of days to weeks. Type 1 is the most common form of diabetes in people younger than 20 years old, but it can occur at any age. People with Type 2 d Continue reading >>

Center For Diabetes & Metabolic Health

Center For Diabetes & Metabolic Health

At NYU Langone’s Center for Diabetes and Metabolic Health, our team is dedicated to helping people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes manage their condition and avoid complications that can affect their health. Our collaborative approach to diabetes care is what sets us apart. Your care team is led by an endocrinologist who works closely with diabetes educators, nutritionists, nurses, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants to develop a treatment plan focused on getting your diabetes under control. Our team then provides the education and support you need to achieve that goal. Learn more about our approach to care for adults with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, including information on physicians who treat these conditions. Preventing and Managing Complications Our goal is twofold: to prevent diabetes complications from occurring, and expertly treat those complications if they occur. Since high blood pressure and uncontrolled cholesterol dramatically increase the risk of advanced diabetes complications, we focus on controlling these factors along with lowering blood glucose levels. Effective treatment prevents complications and reduces your risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney and heart failure, vision loss, and amputation. Leaders in Diabetes Research As a patient at the Center for Diabetes and Metabolic Health, you have access to clinical trials of medications and technologies that often are not widely available to the general public. Experts in our Diabetes Research Program focus on the link between diabetes and complications triggered by high blood glucose, obesity, and cholesterol disorders. More About The Center for Diabetes and Metabolic Health If you’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the right medication and lifestyle modifications can signific Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your health care team helps you manage your diabetes and maintain your good health. According to the American Diabetes Association, your diabetes care team should include: You: You are the most important member of your diabetes care team! Only you know how you feel. Your diabetes care team will depend on you to talk to them honestly and supply information about your body. Monitoring your blood sugar tells your doctors whether your current treatment is controlling your diabetes well. By checking your blood sugar levels, you can also prevent or reduce the episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) you have. Primary doctor: Your primary care doctor is who you see for general checkups and when you get sick. This person is usually an internist or family medicine doctor who has experience treating people with diabetes, too. Because your primary care doctor is your main source of care, he or she will most likely head up your diabetes care team. Endocrinologist: An endocrinologist is a doctor who has special training and experience in treating people with diabetes. You should see yours regularly. Dietitian: A registered dietitian (RD) is trained in the field of nutrition. Food is a key part of your diabetes treatment, so yours will help you figure out your food needs based on your weight, lifestyle, medication, and other health goals (like lowering blood fat levels or blood pressure). Nurse educator: A diabetes educator or diabetes nurse practitioner is a registered nurse (RN) with special training and background in caring for and teaching people with diabetes. Nurse educators often help you with the day-to-day aspects of living with diabetes. Eye doctor: Either an ophthalmologist (a doctor who can treat eye problems both medically and surgically) or an optometrist (someone who Continue reading >>

Diabetes Services In San Diego At Scripps Health

Diabetes Services In San Diego At Scripps Health

Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute is Southern California’s leading diabetes center of excellence, committed to providing the best evidence-based diabetes screening, education and patient care in San Diego. Founded in 1981, our mission is to improve the quality of life for individuals with pre-diabetes, gestational diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes through innovative programs. We offer programs in patient self-management education, clinical research, community-based diabetes care, diabetes prevention, pragmatic retinal screenings, and professional training and education. Our dedication to diabetes care has earned Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla and Scripps Green Hospital recognition as San Diego’s best hospitals for diabetes and endocrinology medicine by U.S. News and World Report. Read more about our exceptional diabetes care and offerings in the Scripps Diabetes Annual Report 2017 (PDF, 1.2 MB). Currently, more than 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and up to one-third of them do not know it. Learn more about diabetes, including the three types of diabetes: gestational diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Definition Type 2 diabetes is a lifelong (chronic) disease in which there is a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Causes Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by special cells, called beta cells. The pancreas is below and behind the stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored and later used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your fat, liver, and muscle cells do not respond correctly to insulin. This is called insulin resistance. As a result, blood sugar does not get into these cells to be stored f Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

There are certain things that you should expect from your medical team. If you have just been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you should have: A full medical examination- this may also include a referral to a specialist eye clinic. A talk with a diabetes care nurse who will explain what diabetes is and about your treatment. Several sessions with your diabetes nurse for basic instruction on injection technique, looking after your insulin, blood glucose meter and pen, blood glucose testing and what the results of your own testing means. You should also expect to have a discussion about hypoglycaemia (hypos) and how to deal with it. After this initial help, you should have access to a diabetes care team where you will have the opportunity to talk to doctors, nurses and dieticians. They will assess your diabetes control and discuss any problems with you. You should also be given a contact number so that you are able to contact a member of the team for advice whenever you need it. Most diabetic clinics have a specialist nurse who will visit you at home between hospital appointments especially in the early days after your diagnosis. Each year you are entitled to an Annual Review assessment by the diabetes care team.This should include a blood pressure check, a measurement of height and weight, drawing blood to find out your cholesterol level and your HbA1c (average blood glucose over the last few weeks), plus a urine test to check whether your kidneys are working well. They should also examine your feet and reflexes to check that your nerves are okay, and they may ask you whether you smoke and offer help to give up if you would like to do so. In addition, the annual review should include an examination of your eyes, although this may be done at a specialist eye clinic. Drops w Continue reading >>

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