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Symptoms Of Very Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycaemia, or a ‘hypo’, is having too little glucose (sugar) in your blood (below 4 mmol/L). This can happen for many reasons such as: you have delayed or missed a meal or snack you have exercised more than usual you have diabetes and you have taken too much insulin. If you have a hypo, you might: feel hungry feel sweaty feel weak look pale feel dizzy or light-headed have tingling lips be trembling or shaking. People with a more severe hypo can: be confused find it hard to concentrate feel irritable or nervous behave irrationally or strangely, which can sometimes be mistaken for drunkenness. People with hypos who don’t get treatment can become unconscious. It can be fatal. If you or anyone you are with develops signs of hypoglycaemia, ring Triple zero (000) and ask for an ambulance. If you or anyone with you has a hypo and becomes unable to swallow, do not try to give them anything to eat or drink. Instead, call Triple zero (000). If the hypo is mild, and the person affected is behaving rationally, here are some things you can do. If your blood glucose level (BGL) is below 4 mmol/L: Step 1 Have 15 grams of fast-acting carbohydrate, such as: 6-7 jellybeans OR half a can of regular soft drink (not ‘diet’) OR half a glass of fruit juice OR 3 teaspoons of sugar or honey OR glucose tablets equivalent to 15 grams carbohydrate. Step 2 Wait 15 minutes, re-check your blood glucose levels to see if your BGL has risen above 4 mmol/L. If your BGL has risen above 4 mmol/L go to Step 3. If your BGL is still below 4 mmol/L, repeat Step 1. Step 3 Eat a snack or meal with a longer-acting carbohydrate, such as: a slice of bread OR 1 glass of milk OR 1 piece of fruit OR 2-3 pieces of dried apricot, figs or other dried fruit OR 1 tub of natural low-fat yoghurt OR pasta OR ric Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

You'll need to test your blood sugar if you think you have hypoglycemia.(ARTIGA PHOTO/CORBIS)Although type 2 diabetes is characterized by blood sugar that is too high, some people take insulin and others medications (such as sulfonylureas) that can occasionally drive blood sugar too low. When blood sugar is too lowgenerally less than 70 mg/dLit's called hypoglycemia, and it can become a medical emergency. (The normal range for fasting blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL, though it varies somewhat with age, and is lower during pregnancy and in children.) You can lose consciousness Hypoglycemia is more likely to occur when you start taking a new medication (it can take practice to match your food intake to your insulin dose, for example) or if you exercise more than usual. As blood sugar drops to low levels, you may feel: Shaky Irritable Sweaty This can occur within 10 to 15 minutes, and in extreme cases you can even lose consciousness and experience seizures if you don't consume some glucose (though hypoglycemia is usually mild in people with type 2 diabetes, and readily fixed by drinking juice or eating other sugar-containing items, such as glucose tablets or four to six pieces of hard candy). Hypoglycemia"My blood sugar was really plummeting" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring You'll need to test your blood sugar to confirm that you're having hypoglycemiasome people become irritable if blood sugar is too high, so it's not always obvious. If you drink sugar-containing juice, or some other form of carbohydrate, it should bring blood sugar back into the normal range. You can also purchase glucose pills or gels in the pharmacy that can get blood sugar back on track. “You should always have a glucose source in the car,” says Yvonne Thigpen, RD, diabetes program coor Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms And Signs

Hypoglycemia Symptoms And Signs

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) means that blood levels of glucose are too low. This condition is most commonly a complication of treatment for diabetes. Symptoms of hypoglycemia vary among people. When blood sugar levels drop, symptoms can include trembling, palpitations (fast or pounding heartbeat), sweating, clammy skin, and hunger. These are among the early symptoms of hypoglycemia. Other possible symptoms of low blood sugar can be lightheadedness, chills, nausea, and lack of coordination. If the low blood sugar levels persist, more serious symptoms develop, such as confusion, difficulty with thinking, and seizures. Eventually, coma may develop. Causes of hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia occurs as a side effect of many treatments for type 1 or 2 diabetes. There are other rare causes for the condition, such as insulin-producing tumors (insulinomas) and certain medications. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

How The Somogyi Effect Causes High Morning Blood Sugar

How The Somogyi Effect Causes High Morning Blood Sugar

is one type of morning high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) caused by very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night. It is also called the rebound effect or rebound hyperglycemia. It's a very rare phenomenon and most often occurs in people with type 1 diabetes. How the Somogyi Effect Works Your body tries to keep your blood sugar levels stable. When blood glucose levels drop during sleep, your body releases hormones that trigger the liver to release glucose. This influx of glucose into the bloodstream can then raise your blood sugar levels beyond what's normal for fasting glucose levels, leading to a high-fasting glucose reading the next morning. Causes The Somogyi effect results from having extra insulin your body before bedtime. Insulin is a hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreas that permits glucose to enter cells and helps the body use glucose for energy. Insulin controls the amount of glucose in the blood. There are a couple ways you could have too much insulin at bedtime: Not having a bedtime snack (which would give the insulin some glucose to work on) Taking long-acting insulins. Because it's often an effect of long-acting insulins, the Somogyi effect mainly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes. How the Somogyi Effect Differs from the Dawn Phenomenon The Somogyi effect is similar to the dawn phenomenon in that both can cause high morning blood glucose readings as a result of a hormone triggering the liver to release glucose into the blood. Unlike the Somogyi effect, however, the dawn phenomenon is not caused by hypoglycemia, but by a random release of the triggering hormones. The only way to know for sure whether you're experiencing the dawn phenomenon or the Somogyi effect is to test your blood sugar in the middle of the night. Wake up sometime b Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia occurs when the level of sugar in the blood is too low. It can also be called insulin shock or insulin reaction. Hypoglycemia is when the level of sugar in the blood is below 60 mg/dl. Check with your doctor or nurse to find out what blood sugar level is too low for you. Causes Taking too much insulin or oral medication Not eating all of your meals and snacks or delaying meals and snacks Doing more exercise than usual Onset Hypoglycemia can occur at any time. It is more likely to occur at peak times of insulin actions. It may occur during or after increased activity. It is more likely if you are late eating your food or reduce the amount that you eat. Signs and Symptoms Sweating Shaking Nervousness Hunger Dizziness Faintness Pounding heart Personality change Confused thinking Impatience Crankiness Numbness of lips and tongue Headache Blurred Vision Slurred or slow speech Convulsions Unconsciousness Treatment Immediately eat or drink something containing "quick acting" sugar. Some possibilities are: 1/2 to 3/4 cup fruit juice 1/2 to 3/4 cup regular soda pop 2-3 teaspoons sugar 10 gumdrops 5-7 lifesavers 2 tablespoons of raisins Over-the-counter sugar tablets or gel If your symptoms do not disappear in 15 minutes and/or your blood sugar remains less than 80, repeat the treatment. Repeat every 15 minutes until the blood sugar is greater than 80. If a reaction occurs at a time when you do not plan to eat your next meal or snack for more than 30 minutes, eat food containing starch and protein after you have taken a "quick acting" sugar source and begin to feel better. Foods containing starch and protein are necessary to help prevent another reaction. Examples of appropriate snacks may be: 6 saltine crackers 3 graham crackers 1/2 meat sandwich 1 slice toast and 1 Continue reading >>

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

back to Overview Know-how Type 2 A tag-team approach on low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. Markus recently wrote an article on our German language blog talking about low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. The question (“can I have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes?”) is very common, and it’s easy to see why it’s of concern. So I’ve helped Markus bring his German post to life here in English. I hope it helps! Here’s Markus: Low blood sugar In 2014, results from the DAWN2 study were announced. It was the largest study of its kind (15,000 participants) on the “fears & needs of people with diabetes and their families.” One result stood out: The gravest fears are related to low blood sugars, especially at night. Up to 69% of the participants share this fear! So! Can you have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes? Yes! Of course! But let’s think about who exactly is at risk – and why. It’s common to think: Type 1 diabetes = at risk for lows Type 2 diabetes = not at risk for lows But that isn’t correct at all, so we should wipe it from our mind. So… what do I need to know? Maybe it’s more accurate to say that people with type 2 diabetes who take certain types of medication are more at risk for lows. We’re getting closer! But to get to the truth, we should take a look at someone without diabetes. Is it possible for them to have lows, too? Theoretically yes, especially if doing long-lasting physical activities without proper food intake. Additionally, extreme stress and binge drinking are also common causes of low blood sugar for people without diabetes. However, it’s pretty rare because as soon as BG’s drop below 80 mg/dl (4.4 mmol/L), the natural counterregulatory system kicks in, raising blood sugar back to normal levels. I’ve never exp Continue reading >>

In The Absence Of Diabetes Or Physical Symptoms, Is Very Low-blood Sugar Bad?

In The Absence Of Diabetes Or Physical Symptoms, Is Very Low-blood Sugar Bad?

I've seen reports from people, some of whom mentioned they were in Ketosis, that their blood sugar readings are scary low. I think someone on here posted once how they had a reading of 50something, but felt fine. I'm not diabetic, but I check my blood sugar from time to time and when I'm in ketosis, it's generally on the hypoglycemic side. I myself have gotten readings in the 60mg/deciliter range. I feel fine though and don't have any weakness/cold sweats or any other typical hypoglycemic symptoms. We already know that Ketosis reduces the need for glucose uptake by the muscles and brain. Certainly it's not illogical to assume that there's going to be a lot less sugar floating around hence a naturally lower blood sugar level while in ketosis. But I think this sort of thing exists even in people who aren't in ketosis, they simply have good blood sugar control or don't consume many simple carbohydrates. 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com Having talked to people online about this same issue, they're not sure what causes it either. I haven't seen any mention of very low blood sugar in the absence of any symptoms in medical literature. Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Tweet Knowing and understanding the symptoms of high and low blood sugar should be essential for both diabetics and their friends and families. Symptoms of high blood sugar Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is common amongst diabetics. It occurs when a diabetic person eats too much food, and has too little insulin to regulate their blood sugar. Sometimes stress can cause diabetes. Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Need for frequent urination Drowsiness Nausea Extreme hunger and/or thirst Blurring of the vision Symptoms of low blood sugar Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when a diabetic has not eaten enough food, or has too much insulin within his or her body. An excessive amount of exercise can also cause low blood sugar levels. Be aware of low blood sugar symptoms Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Shaking Fast heartbeat Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Extreme hunger Weakness and tiredness Irritability Why do these symptoms matter for diabetics? These symptoms are essential for diabetics to understand, because they may encounter high or low blood sugar levels from time to time. A cold or virus can cause sudden high blood sugar levels, and understand the symptoms means knowing how to deal with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. People with diabetes who can recognise the symptoms can avoid levels that lead to medical emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Knowing your high and low blood sugar symptoms allows you to test Once you understand symptoms of high and low blood sugar, it is possible to test quickly and avoid serious proble Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar

Topic Overview Symptoms of mild low blood sugar You may have these symptoms when your blood sugar has dropped below 4.0 millimoles per litre (mmol/L). When you have had diabetes for many years, you may not always develop symptoms of mild low blood sugar. Some young children with diabetes cannot recognize symptoms of low blood sugar. Others can, but not every time. To be safe, the parents need to do a home blood sugar test whenever they suspect low blood sugar in a child. Symptoms may include: Sweating (almost always present). Check for sweating on the back of your neck at your hairline. Nervousness, shakiness, and weakness. Extreme hunger and slight nausea. Dizziness and headache. Blurred vision. A fast heartbeat and feeling anxious. These symptoms may go away shortly after you eat food that contains sugar. Symptoms of moderate low blood sugar If your blood sugar continues to drop, your behaviour may change. Symptoms may include: Inability to concentrate. Confusion and irritability. Slurred speech. Unsteadiness when standing or walking. Muscle twitching. Personality changes, such as anger or crying. Symptoms of severe low blood sugar Symptoms of severe low blood sugar include: Seizure. Loss of consciousness (coma). Stroke. Death. Signs of low blood sugar at night If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night (nocturnal hypoglycemia) include: Restlessness. Making unusual noises. Attempting to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. Sleepwalking. Nightmares. Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. Signs of hypoglycemic unawareness Some people have no symptoms of low b Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Definition Glucose is a type of sugar. It is your body's main source of energy. Hypoglycemia is a condition where the level of glucose in your blood becomes low enough to cause symptoms. When blood glucose drops too low, your body does not have enough energy to function properly. Causes Medications for diabetes are the most common cause, particularly when combined with the following factors: Taking too much blood sugar-lowering medication Delaying or missing meals, or eating too little at meals Too much or too strenuous exercise Reactive hypoglycemia may also occur in people without diabetes. It is thought to be rare. Other causes of hypoglycemia include: Alcohol use disorder, especially binge drinking coupled with not eating Starvation Early pregnancy Certain pituitary or adrenal gland conditions Certain liver conditions Certain types of stomach surgery Tumor that makes insulin Hereditary enzyme or hormone deficiencies Severe illness or infection Risk Factors that may increase your chances of hypoglycemia: Having diabetes Taking medications that lower blood sugar levels Drinking too much alcohol Fasting, particularly in combination with strenuous exercise Symptoms Symptoms may come on slowly or suddenly. Hypoglycemia may cause: Sweating Nervousness Lightheadedness Rapid heartbeat Hunger Headache Tingling feeling around the mouth As hypoglycemia worsens, it may cause: Fatigue Weakness Inappropriate behavior or severe confusion Poor control of movements Seizure Loss of consciousness If you have frequent hypoglycemia, you may lose many of the early symptoms and be at particular risk of sudden loss of consciousness, seizure, or bizarre behavior. This could affect your ability to operate machinery or a motor vehicle. You will need to discuss any special instructions with yo Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugar

Treating Low Blood Sugar

You are at risk of having a low blood sugar reaction if you: Skip or delay a meal or snack Take too much insulin or eat too few carbohydrates Exercise Drink alcohol, especially without eating carbohydrates Check your blood sugar if you have any of these symptoms: Weakness and/or fatigue Headache Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Shaking Increased heartbeat If your blood sugar is less than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl): Eat 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrate (sample foods listed below) Wait 15 minutes and then recheck your blood sugar If your blood sugar is still less than 100 mg/dl, take another 15 grams of carbohydrate and retest your blood sugar in another 15 minutes. Repeat if necessary. Important: If you have frequent low blood sugars speak to your doctor. You may need changes in your medication and/or meal plan. Quick Carbohydrate Guide for Treating Low Blood Sugars If your blood sugar is less than 70 mg/dl, you need 15 to 30 grams of a quickly absorbed carbohydrate, like the ones listed below. Each of the following servings provides 15 grams of carbohydrate. Candies and Other Sweets 5 small gum drops 12 gummy bears 6 large jelly beans 5 Life Savers 15 Skittles 1 Tablespoon honey, jam or jelly 1 Tablespoon sugar in water 4 Starburst Beverages 1/2 cup apple juice 1/2 cup orange or grapefruit juice 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1/2 cup regular soda (not diet) 1/3 cup grape juice 1/3 cup cranberry juice 1/3 cup prune juice 1 cup fat free milk Fruits 1/2 banana 1 small apple 1 small orange 1/2 cup applesauce 2 tablespoons of raisins 15 grapes Other 3 to 4 glucose tablets 1 tube glucose gel Note: The foods listed above are easily absorbed and will raise blood sugar levels quickly. Foods that contain protein or fat — such as chocolate, candy bars, ice cream, cookies, crackers and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (dm) And Disorders Of Blood Sugar Metabolism

Diabetes Mellitus (dm) And Disorders Of Blood Sugar Metabolism

Hypoglycemia is abnormally low levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Hypoglycemia is most often caused by drugs taken to control diabetes. Much less common causes of hypoglycemia include other drugs, critical illness or organ failure, a reaction to carbohydrates (in susceptible people), an insulin-producing tumor in the pancreas, and some types of bariatric (weight loss) surgery. A fall in blood glucose causes symptoms such as hunger, sweating, shakiness, fatigue, weakness, and inability to think clearly, whereas severe hypoglycemia causes symptoms such as confusion, seizures, and coma. The diagnosis for a person who has diabetes is based on finding low glucose levels in the blood while the person is experiencing symptoms. Normally, the body maintains the level of glucose in the blood within a range of about 70 to 110 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) of blood. In hypoglycemia, the glucose level becomes too low. Although diabetes mellitus, a disorder involving blood glucose levels, is characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood (hyperglycemia), many people with diabetes periodically experience hypoglycemia due to side effects of diabetes treatment. Hypoglycemia is uncommon among people without diabetes. Very low levels of glucose in the blood may interfere with the function of certain organ systems. The brain is particularly sensitive to low glucose levels because sugar is the brain's major energy source. To prevent glucose levels in the blood from falling too far below their usual range, the brain responds by stimulating the All of these hormones cause the liver to release glucose into the blood, but sometimes these hormones do not raise the blood glucose level enough to overcome the hypoglycemia. If the blood glucose level remains too low, the brain will get Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormal decrease of glucose concentration in the blood, or more simply - low blood sugar levels. A normal blood glucose value for healthy, non-diabetic dogs is 3.3-6.1 mmol/L. Hypoglycemia occurs when excessive glucose consumption depletes the reserves of glucose in the body. Hypoglycemia can be a result of endocrine or hepatic disorders, a higher energy requirement for glucose, lack of glucose due to fasting, or toxicity. Hypoglycemia will leave dogs feeling weak and groggy. If left untreated, unconsciousness followed by death will result. Hypoglycemia is defined as a low blood sugar concentration. As sugar (in the form of glucose) is the primary energy source in the body, low blood sugar levels will ultimately affect organ and brain function. Symptoms of hypoglycemia will usually begin with low energy and a delayed response time, if left to progress further these symptoms will develop into more serious signs such as seizures and collapse. Potential symptoms include: Loss of appetite Lethargy (low energy) Slow response time Unusual behaviour Polyuria (increased urination) Polydipsia (increased thirst) Lack of coordination Partial paralysis of hindquarters Weakness Exercise intolerance Trembling Involuntary twitching Seizures Unconsciousness Hypoglycemia can be the result of underlying endocrine or hepatic disorders, sudden increase in the use of glucose by the body, inadequate amounts of glucose, or toxicity. Causes include: Abnormal growth of pancreatic cells Cancer in the liver or gastrointestinal system Inflammation of the liver Portosystemic shunt Glycogen-storage disease Excessive strenuous exercise Overuse of glucose in the body during pregnancy Reduced intake of glucose due to starvation or malnutrition Delayed time between meals in ki Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Treatment

Hypoglycemia Treatment

Your treatment plan for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) depends on what is causing your blood sugar level to drop too low. As you can learn in the causes article, hypoglycemia causes fall into two categories: low blood glucose caused by diabetes and low blood glucose not caused by diabetes. Diabetes-related Hypoglycemia If your hypoglycemia is caused by certain medications used for diabetes (people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes can become hypoglycemic), your healthcare professional may suggest several things to help you treat hypoglycemia when it happens. He or she may also suggest adjustments in your diabetes treatment plan to help you prevent hypoglycemia. The doctor may suggest: Medication (e.g., insulin certain oral medications) dose adjustment: This may also include changing when you take your medication. Working with a dietitian to develop or adjust your meal plan: A dietitian can help you figure out a good meal plan—for example, one that maintains consistency in carbohydrates at meals. A dietitian can also help you learn how to count grams of carbohydrates so that you can better plan your medication and/or insulin. Increase (or more closely follow) self-monitoring of blood glucose levels: Knowing your blood glucose level throughout the day—when you get up, before meals, after meals, etc.—can help you avoid going low. Limit consumption of alcoholic beverages: Alcohol can affect the way your body metabolizes glucose, so if you're already prone to hypoglycemia, you should cut back on how much alcohol you drink. Carry glucose tablets (dextrose) or hard candy: With your healthcare professional's recommendation, make sure you always have glucose tablets or hard candy with you. You can stick them in your briefcase, purse, car, at your desk, school locker, e Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by low blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body. Carbohydrates, such as rice, potatoes, bread, cereal, fruit and sweets, are the major source of glucose in our diet. The ideal range of fasting morning blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL (milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood). Blood sugar levels under 70 mg/dL are too low and are considered unhealthy. Hypoglycemia may be a condition by itself, or may be a complication of diabetes or another disorder. It’s most often seen as a complication of diabetes. This is sometimes referred to as insulin reaction. Hypoglycemia can happen quickly. In adults and children older than age 10, hypoglycemia is uncommon except as a potential side effect of diabetes treatment. What causes hypoglycemia? Causes of hypoglycemia in people with diabetes may include the following: Too much medicine, such as diabetes medicines A missed meal A delayed meal Too little food eaten as compared to the amount of insulin or other medicine taken Other causes of hypoglycemia are rare, but may happen in early pregnancy, after strenuous exercise, or during prolonged fasting. Hypoglycemia may also result from abusing alcohol, or other rare causes, such as a tumor that makes insulin. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? The following are the most common symptoms of hypoglycemia. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. The symptoms include: Shakiness Dizziness Sweating Hunger and nausea Headache Irritability Pale skin color Sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason Clumsy or jerky movements Difficulty paying attention, or confusion Tingling sensations around the mouth Rapid heartbeat Blurred or impaired vision Continue reading >>

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