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Sugar Level During 7th Month Pregnancy

High Blood Sugar In Pregnancy Puts Baby At Risk

High Blood Sugar In Pregnancy Puts Baby At Risk

Print Font: CHICAGO — The higher a pregnant woman’s level of blood sugar, the greater the risk to her newborn — whether the mother has diabetes or not, the largest study on the problem suggests. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. The findings released Friday may lead to more women being diagnosed with diabetes during pregnancy and given stricter diet advice or medication to lower blood sugar. The research involved more than 23,000 pregnant women in nine countries. It found a surprisingly strong relationship between the blood sugar levels of the women and the rate of big babies and first-time Caesarean sections, said lead investigator Dr. Boyd Metzger of Northwestern University. The newborns also were more likely to have low blood sugar levels and high insulin levels if their mothers’ blood sugar levels were higher. The problems can lead to obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure later in life. Risks for large babies Large babies risk shoulder damage and other injuries if delivered vaginally and lead to more C-sections, which also pose health risks to mothers and babies. Large babies were defined in the study as those bigger than 90 percent of those born in the local population, so large Thai babies would be smaller than large U.S. babies. Researchers reported the findings Friday at the American Diabetes Association’s annual scientific meeting. The higher the mother’s blood sugar, the more Continue reading >>

Expecting The Best: Diabetes, Pregnancy, And Blood Glucose Control

Expecting The Best: Diabetes, Pregnancy, And Blood Glucose Control

by Laura Hieronymus, RN, MSEd, CDE and Patti Geil, MS, RD, LD, CDE Pregnancy can be a special and exciting time in a woman's life. The anticipation begins as soon as you hear the words: “You're expecting a baby.” Once you've gotten used to the amazing news, you may wonder about such things as whether the baby will be a boy or a girl, when the baby is due, and, perhaps most important, what you need to do in the meantime to make sure the baby stays healthy and develops normally. All women feel a certain amount of anxiety and sometimes even fear about how pregnancy will affect them, and whether their baby will be healthy and normal. Women with diabetes are no different, but they do have one more thing to be concerned about: maintaining control of blood glucose levels. This is true whether a woman has type 1 or type 2 diabetes before becoming pregnant, or whether she is diagnosed with a condition called gestational diabetes during pregnancy. The good news is that if a woman who has diabetes (of any type) learns as much as she can about managing her blood glucose, and puts that knowledge into practice, she can have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Blood glucose control essential Optimal blood glucose control is important throughout pregnancy, both for the mother's health and the baby's. Glucose in a mother's blood crosses the placenta to her baby, affecting the baby's blood glucose level. (The placenta, a flat circular organ, links the unborn baby to the mother's uterus, to provide oxygen, nutrients, and the elimination of wastes.) The baby begins making its own insulin around 13 weeks gestation. If the baby is constantly exposed to high levels of glucose, it is as if the baby were overeating: The baby produces more insulin to absorb the excess glucose, resulting Continue reading >>

The 7th Month-pregnancy And Diabetes

The 7th Month-pregnancy And Diabetes

Saturday marked the start of my 32nd week or month 8! I was told at my last OB appointment that I will be induced at week 39 so I have less than 7 weeks to go! It might sound crazy but I actually feel like the days/weeks/months are flying by now. I can’t believe since I last wrote about my pregnancy I was beginning the third trimester and now 4 weeks later, I’m through with weeks 28-31 (or the 7th month). At lot has happened in the last month. My husband and I finished up our Childbirth class and I think I’m more scared now than I was before, but at least I know a little more about what to expect. We took a Newborn Care and Safety class so I now know how to give a baby a bath among other things. My husband now knows how to hold a baby. I had my baby shower last weekend and got a lot of great things for the baby and as a result, my nursery is getting closer to completion. My neighbors are throwing us a baby shower on Friday night so I think after that we are going to go to the stores and buy what is remaining for baby so hopefully by next week, we will be all set up. We did buy our car seat and have it installed so we are ready to bring baby home from the hospital. I’ve been in the third trimester for about four weeks and it is not as great as the second trimester. I have been so exhausted that I need to take like a 2 hour nap everyday. Thankfully, I work from home with a flexible schedule so I can afford to take a nap everyday. I have also had horrendous back pain. The weird thing is that it isn’t my lower back, it’s my upper back. I’ve been doing yoga and that sort of helps but doesn’t eliminate it. For the majority of the day, I can’t get comfortable. However, exhaustion and back pain are the only major issues I am having right now so I can’t compl Continue reading >>

Hi, I Am On My 7th Month Of Pregnancy And My Suger Level Is Quite High.

Hi, I Am On My 7th Month Of Pregnancy And My Suger Level Is Quite High.

My sugar level is 148 and doctor has suggested me to control the same. I usually have 2 cups of tea, fruits (mostly pomigranate and apples), dry fruits (cashews and nuts) and proper servings of calcium. I need to know what should I change in my diet to keep myself at the balanced sugar level. Thanks. Watching your intake of carbohydrates (fresh and particularly dried fruit can have a lot). Fresh vegetables typically have fewer and are a "freebie" from the perspective of managing gestational diabetes. And balance out your carbohydrates with better sources of fats and protein. Cheese sticks and nuts can be good additions to your snacks. I'm diabetic & 148 isn't "high" for me. My doctor is actually telling me to target for 140. But I guess for someone who isn't already diabetic before pregnancy the target may be different. What are you using in your tea? If you add table sugar try using Splenda. Also, even though fruits are good for you, they do have natural sugars, so you don't want to over do it in that department. The nuts are the only thing I see listed that have protein which is also important for sugar balance. Are you vegetarian or did you just not list the meats you eat? Cheese & beans also have high protein content. Good luck. I have gest. diabetes. My OB wants my number to be less than 130 after an hour of eating. If I have a piece of fruit I have to add a protein. Just watch your carb intake. Recent questions in Nutrition & Weight Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes is diabetes that is found for the first time when a woman is pregnant. The expecting mother develops large amount of sugar in her blood which generally resolves itself after baby's birth - unlike other types of diabetes which are lifelong conditions. How does Gestational Diabetes develop? Gestational diabetes develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin - a substance produced by pancreas which regulates the amount of sugar available in the blood for energy and enables any sugar that isn't immediately required to be stored. The pregnant women has to produce extra insulin to meet baby's needs, if her body can't manage this, she may develop gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels may also rise because the hormonal changes of pregnancy interfere with insulin function. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the last half of pregnancy. Risk Factors • Women who are obese. • Women with high blood pressure • Women listed positive for sugar in urine during antenatal checkup. • Women who are above 25yrs of age. • Women with family history of type 2 diabetes. How is Gestational Diabetes Treated? Gestational Diabetes can be treated by keeping blood glucose level in a target range. Proper diet, physical activity and insulin if required plays important role in maintaining blood glucose levels. • Dietary Tips 1. Have small frequent meals i.e. six small meals in a day. 2. Limit sweets. 3. Include more and more fiber in your diet in form of fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals. 4. Carbohydrates should be 40%-45% of the total calories with breakfast and a bedtime snack containing 15-30 grams of carbohydrates. 5. Drink 8-10 glasses of liquids/day. 6. Avoid Trans fats, fried foods Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Almost two million women of reproductive age have diabetes, and these numbers continue to rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is extremely important for women with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels before they become pregnant, because if women have poorly controlled diabetes going into a pregnancy, they are at much higher risk for serious fetal complications. This improved control can be accomplished with education and medical management. Women with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes are also at higher risk for: Large birth weight babies, resulting in more Cesarean deliveries and increased complications during delivery Premature births or fetal death Pre-eclampsia: a dangerous surge in blood pressure associated with protein in the urine Diabetic retinopathy: damage to the retina caused by high glucose levels Diabetic kidney disease Severe hypoglycemia: episodes of low blood glucose levels that can result in confusion or unconsciousness Ensuring a healthy pregnancy The good news is that women with uncomplicated diabetes who keep their blood glucose levels in a normal range before and during pregnancy have about the same chance of having a successful pregnancy as women without diabetes. The Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess Pregnancy Program recommends the following blood glucose goals and medical assessments before pregnancy: Fasting and pre-meal blood glucose: 80-110 mg/dl Blood glucose one hour after meal: 100-155 mg/dl A1C, a blood test that measures average blood glucose over two to three months: less than 7 percent and as close to 6% as possible without hypoglycemia Review of diabetes and obstetrical history Eye evaluations to screen for and discuss risks of diabetic retinopathy Renal, thyroid, gynecological and sometimes c Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes happens when you have too much sugar (glucose) in your blood during pregnancy. Your blood sugar levels can go up when your body isn’t producing enough of a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps: the muscles and tissues in your body to use blood sugar for energy your body to store any blood sugar that isn’t needed While you’re expecting, your body has to make extra insulin, especially from mid-pregnancy onwards. You need extra insulin because hormones from the placenta make your body less responsive to it. If your body can’t meet this extra demand, your blood sugar levels will rise and you may develop gestational diabetes. Having too much sugar in your blood can cause problems for you and your baby, so you’ll have extra care during your pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is common, affecting as many as one in six mums-to-be. The good news is that gestational diabetes usually goes away after your baby is born. It’s different from type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, which last a lifetime. Gestational diabetes often doesn’t have any very recognisable symptoms, but you may: feel tired have a dry mouth be very thirsty pee a lot get recurring infections, such as thrush have blurred vision If you have any of these symptoms, tell your doctor. What makes me prone to develop gestational diabetes? You may be more likely to develop gestational diabetes if: Your body mass index (BMI) is 25 or more. You have already given birth to a large baby weighing 4.5kg or more. You’ve had gestational diabetes before or your close relatives have had diabetes. Some ethnicities are more prone to diabetes, and sadly, South Asian are among those. So if there is a family history of gestational diabetes or diabetes, you might be more likel Continue reading >>

I'm Pregnant And The Doctor Found Sugar In My Urine

I'm Pregnant And The Doctor Found Sugar In My Urine

At my check-up today, a small trace of sugar was present in my urine. The doctor pricked my finger and tested my blood and said the trace was fine (the reading was 5.8mmol/L) and that small traces of sugar are quite common in late pregnancy. The doctor didn't seem concerned, so I didn't ask any questions. Now I'm wondering if I should be taking any special precautions, such as changing my diet, or if I should be concerned that this is an indicator of potential problems. In pregnancy, the body changes the way it manages glucose and reacts to insulin. For some, the extent of these changes means a diagnosis of gestational diabetes (diabetes in pregnancy) is made. In some countries a short glucose tolerance test is done at around 28-weeks in all women to detect this. In the UK women are usually screened if they; develop glucose (sugar) in the urine, which is common and often doesn't develop into gestational diabetes have a large baby show signs of excess fluid around the baby. The diagnosis of gestational diabetes is usually made if the fasting blood sample is greater than 7mmol/l or if the two-hour level is greater than 11.1mmol/l. Cut off levels for diagnosis vary a little between different units. If someone is diagnosed with gestational diabetes, the mainstay of treatment is a diet with reduced fat, increased fibre and regulation of carbohydrate intake. Eliminating certain foods from your diet can lead to rapid improvement, for example high calorie drinks, snack foods and fresh orange juice. While the result of your blood test means there is no need for you to be concerned about diabetes, adhering to a lower fat, high fibre diet with plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, and avoiding high calorie foods can only be a good thing. Yours sincerely The NetDoctor Medical Team Continue reading >>

Dates During Pregnancy: Do They Really Ease Labor?

Dates During Pregnancy: Do They Really Ease Labor?

When it comes to childbirth we all want to have an easy, short, and healthy labor and delivery. Luckily, there are a number of things we can do to help us achieve that, such as: Taking an out-of-hospital childbirth education class Working with a birth doula Knowing the truth about epidurals Taking the best prenatal vitamin Looking into a birth center Doing pregnancy exercises to get baby in optimal position Perineal massage And now you can add one more thing to your list: Eating dates. Yes, dates. Eat dates during pregnancy for the best labor and birth Have you ever thought to snack your way to an easier labor? According to this study, women who ate 6 dates a day for the four weeks leading up to their due date were significantly more dilated and more likely to: Have intact membranes upon admission to the hospital Go into labor spontaneously Avoid pitocin And have a shorter first phase of labor A 2014 study in the Journal of Midwifery & Reproductive Health looked at date consumption in late pregnancy as it related to cervical ripening, and it found that date eaters had: Higher Bishop scores at admission to birthplace Greater cervical dilation compared More successful rates of labor induction Finally, a study in March 2017 supported all the initial findings. The authors of this study concluded that: Dates fruit consumption during late pregnancy has been shown to positively affect the outcome of labour and delivery without adverse effect on the mother and child.” Pretty awesome for just eating some dates, huh? So why does eating dates during pregnancy help mamas-to-be? Researchers have found that date fruit has an oxytocin-like effect on the body, leading to increased sensitivity of the uterus. It also helps stimulate uterine contractions, and reduces postpartum hemorrha Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes During Pregnancy

Type 2 Diabetes During Pregnancy

There’s lots of good news these days for pregnant women with type 2 diabetes (a condition in which the body doesn’t respond as it should to insulin). In fact, with the right medical help and diligent self-care, you have about the same excellent chances of having a successful pregnancy and a healthy baby as any other expectant mom. The key to managing type 2 diabetes during pregnancy? Achieving normal blood glucose levels six months before conception and maintaining those levels throughout the nine months following it. So if you’ve been on top of keeping your diabetes under control, it’s more important than ever to continue your routine now that there are two of you on board. Here's what to think about if you're heading into pregnancy with type 2 diabetes: Your care team How does diabetes affect babies during pregnancy? If you have type 2 diabetes, you already have higher levels of glucose circulating in your blood; issues can come up if your blood sugar levels aren’t well monitored and managed. That’s because extra sugar can be transferred to baby while you're expecting — and a fetus that’s served too much glucose reacts by producing an increased supply of insulin (which can result in a too-large baby and other complications). READ MORE: Gestational Diabetes Finding your pregnancy and diabetes care team Be prepared: You’ll have a lot more prenatal visits than other expectant moms and will probably be given more doctors’ orders to follow (all for a good cause). So it’s a good idea to get your medical team in place as soon as you think you might want to get pregnant. The OB or midwife who supervises your pregnancy should have plenty of experience caring for diabetic moms-to-be, and he or she should work together with the doctor who has been in charge Continue reading >>

What Might Go Wrong In The Third Trimester?

What Might Go Wrong In The Third Trimester?

Weeks 28 through 40 bring the arrival of the third trimester. This exciting time is definitely the home stretch for expectant mothers, but it also presents a time where complications can occur. Just as each trimester can bring its own challenges, so can the third trimester. Prenatal care is especially important in the third trimester because the types of complications that can arise at this time are more easily managed if detected early. You’ll likely start visiting your obstetrician every other week from 28 to 36 weeks, then once per week until your little one arrives. According to the American Diabetes Association, as many as 9.2 percent of pregnant women have gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs because the hormonal changes of pregnancy make it more difficult for your body to effectively use insulin. When insulin cannot do its job of lowering blood sugar to normal levels, the result is abnormally high glucose (blood sugar) levels. Most women have no symptoms. While this condition is usually not dangerous for the mother, it poses several problems for the fetus. Specifically, macrosomia (excessive growth) of the fetus can increase the likelihood of cesarean delivery and the risk of birth injuries. When glucose levels are well-controlled, macrosomia is less likely. At the beginning of the third trimester (between weeks 24 and 28), all women should get tested for gestational diabetes. During the glucose tolerance test (also known as the screening glucose challenge test), you will consume a drink that contains a certain amount of glucose (sugar) and at a specified time later your doctor will test your blood sugar levels. For the oral glucose tolerance test, your blood sugar levels are checked after you have fasted for at least eight hours and you’ve drank Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels During Pregnancy

Blood Sugar Levels During Pregnancy

Tweet Blood glucose control is one of the most important factors during pregnancy. Tight blood glucose control, helps to ensure the best chance of a successful pregnancy. Diabetes control is important for people who have diabetes going into their pregnancy as well as people who develop diabetes during their pregnancy (gestational diabetes). What is gestational diabetes? It has been reported that on average 2% to 4% of women develop temporary diabetes also known as gestational diabetes. This happens because they are unable to produce an increased amount of insulin to overcome the resistance levels. In gestational diabetes there is not normally any show of external symptoms normally recognised as characteristic of the disease for example excessive thirst, tiredness and increased urination. Blood sugar control during pregnancy Good blood glucose control reduces the risks of complications developing for the mother and baby. The target HbA1c for mothers before and during pregnancy is 6.1% (or 43 mmol/mol). [91] People with diabetes before their pregnancy will be advised to keep excellent control of their blood sugar before and throughout the pregnancy. The first eight weeks of the pregnancy are a critical period and so it is highly recommended that strong control is achieved prior to becoming pregnant wherever possible. Mothers who develop gestational diabetes will be treated initially with diet and exercise but may be put onto oral hypoglycaemics (tablets) or insulin injections if blood sugar levels remain high. Diabetes management To help you to meet the challenging blood glucose targets, you will be expected to test your blood glucose before each meal and 1 hour after eating. People taking insulin for their diabetes will also need to test before bed each night. You will h Continue reading >>

Glucose Test During Pregnancy – Why, What And When?

Glucose Test During Pregnancy – Why, What And When?

Is the glucose test during pregnancy only for those with a history of diabetes? Are you pregnant and waiting to get your glucose test done? Is the glucose test during pregnancy phase mandatory? If anyone asks me what was the one thing that I hated during my pregnancy, my answer would be – the Glucose Test. I know mommies, even you might feel the same. But this is a test that should not be ignored at any cost during one’s pregnancy. It’s very important to avoid any complications in your pregnancy stage. This test, along with the others prescribed by your doctor, will help to ensure that you and your baby stay healthy through the course of your pregnancy. Before heading into details about this test, we will discuss a few things about insulin function, gestational diabetes mellitus, the risk factors, symptoms, effects on your baby, treatment and a few food suggestions. Insulin and its function: Insulin is the hormone which facilitates the entry of glucose into the cells of our body thus helping to keep blood glucose level in control. But do you know the fact that this insulin hormone can be blocked by certain hormones when we are pregnant? Now you may think “So how can one manage their blood sugar levels during pregnancy” Want to know?? Read on to clear all your doubts and concerns. Gestational diabetes or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM): As I mentioned above, during pregnancy, our body produces some hormones against our own insulin thus making us resistant to insulin. This hormonal action is necessary as it takes place to give the sufficient glucose from the mom’s blood to the growing foetus inside the womb. But we moms also need sufficient insulin to get our blood sugar levels under control. Our body knows this too. So the good thing is that our body prod Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes (diabetes During Pregnancy)

Gestational Diabetes (diabetes During Pregnancy)

Definition of Diabetes During Pregnancy: Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that starts during pregnancy. When the pregnant woman has diabetes, her body is not able to consume the sugar (glucose) in her blood as well as it should. So the level of glucose in the blood becomes above normal. Gestational diabetes occurs in 4% of pregnant women. It is usually diagnosed in the fifth or sixth month of pregnancy (Between the 24th and 28th weeks). Generally, Females are cured from gestational diabetes after delivery. Causes of gestational diabetes: Almost all women have some degree of impaired glucose intolerance during pregnancy due to the hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy. In this case, the level of glucose in the blood may be higher than normal, but not high enough to cause diabetes. During the last phase of the pregnancy (the third trimester), these hormonal changes place pregnant women at risk for gestational diabetes. During pregnancy, increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta (the organ that connects the baby by the umbilical cord to the uterus) help shifting nutrients from the mother to the growing fetus. The placenta produces hormones to prevent developing low blood sugar. They stop the actions of insulin. Over the course of the pregnancy, these hormones produce impaired glucose intolerance, which increase the level of glucose in the blood. In order to decrease this level, the body makes more insulin to shuttle glucose into cells. Usually the mother's pancreas can produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the effect of the pregnancy hormones on glucose levels. When the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to do it, the glucose levels will raise and cause gestational diabetes. Risk factors for Diabetes Dur Continue reading >>

Mothers' High Normal Blood Sugar Levels Place Infants At Risk For Birth Problems

Mothers' High Normal Blood Sugar Levels Place Infants At Risk For Birth Problems

Pregnant women with blood sugar levels in the higher range of normal — but not high enough to be considered diabetes — are more likely than women with lower blood sugar levels to give birth to babies at risk for many of the same problems seen in babies born to women with diabetes during pregnancy, according to a study funded in large part by the National Institutes of Health. These problems included a greater likelihood for Caesarean delivery and an abnormally large body size at birth. Infants born to women with higher blood sugar levels were also at risk for shoulder dystocia, a condition occurring during birth, in which an infant’s shoulder becomes lodged inside the mother's body, effectively halting the birth process. The study authors declined to make recommendations for acceptable blood sugar levels for pregnant women. The researchers were unable to identify a precise level where an elevation in blood sugar increased the risk for any of the outcomes observed in the study. Rather, the chances for the outcomes were observed to increase gradually, corresponding with increases in the women’s blood sugar levels. It is well known that high blood sugar levels characteristic of the diabetes that occurs during pregnancy present risks for expectant mothers and the infants born to them. The current study is the first to document that higher blood sugar levels, not high enough to be considered diabetes, also convey these increased risks. Furthermore, when the researchers mathematically adjusted for other potential causes of these risks — such as older maternal age, obesity, and high blood pressure — the increased risks due to higher blood sugar levels were still present. "These important new findings highlight the risks of elevated blood sugar levels during pregnan Continue reading >>

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