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Sugar Level During 7th Month Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes (diabetes During Pregnancy)

Gestational Diabetes (diabetes During Pregnancy)

Definition of Diabetes During Pregnancy: Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that starts during pregnancy. When the pregnant woman has diabetes, her body is not able to consume the sugar (glucose) in her blood as well as it should. So the level of glucose in the blood becomes above normal. Gestational diabetes occurs in 4% of pregnant women. It is usually diagnosed in the fifth or sixth month of pregnancy (Between the 24th and 28th weeks). Generally, Females are cured from gestational diabetes after delivery. Causes of gestational diabetes: Almost all women have some degree of impaired glucose intolerance during pregnancy due to the hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy. In this case, the level of glucose in the blood may be higher than normal, but not high enough to cause diabetes. During the last phase of the pregnancy (the third trimester), these hormonal changes place pregnant women at risk for gestational diabetes. During pregnancy, increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta (the organ that connects the baby by the umbilical cord to the uterus) help shifting nutrients from the mother to the growing fetus. The placenta produces hormones to prevent developing low blood sugar. They stop the actions of insulin. Over the course of the pregnancy, these hormones produce impaired glucose intolerance, which increase the level of glucose in the blood. In order to decrease this level, the body makes more insulin to shuttle glucose into cells. Usually the mother's pancreas can produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the effect of the pregnancy hormones on glucose levels. When the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to do it, the glucose levels will raise and cause gestational diabetes. Risk factors for Diabetes Dur Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Dealing with disease and pregnancy Pregnancy is full of challenges—and even more so if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. So how do you handle a demanding disease and pregnancy? It may not be as hard as you think, says Cheryl Alkon, author of Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes. But you do need a plan. Before starting a family, check out these 7 tips that can help you ace diabetes management and have a healthy pregnancy. Get your blood sugar under control If you're thinking about getting pregnant, you need to kick bad habits (like smoking), lose weight (if you're overweight), and take prenatal vitamins. You can add one more item to the list if you have diabetes: Get your blood sugar under control. If your blood sugar levels are too high or too low, you may have a tough time getting pregnant. "In that case, your body may recognize that it's not a hospitable place for a pregnancy," says Alkon. Women with type 2 diabetes are particularly at risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which can also make it difficult to get pregnant. Medications that stimulate ovulation, such as Clomid and Serophene, can help. Assemble a diabetes team Pregnant women with diabetes could have up to three times as many appointments as women at a lower risk of complications. Find a high-risk obstetrician to monitor your pregnancy and check whether your endocrinologist is willing to work with your ob-gyn. "You want doctors who really know what diabetes is all about," says Alkon. The constant monitoring, ultrasounds, and additional blood sugar tests add up. So "make sure you know the ins and outs of your insurance plan," she adds. Consider going off oral medications Most doctors suggest that pregnant women with type 2 diabetes discontinue oral medications, says Alkon. This is because Continue reading >>

Are You Pregnant With Increased Blood Sugar Levels?

Are You Pregnant With Increased Blood Sugar Levels?

Gestational diabetes occurs during pregnancy & seen in approximately 10% of all pregnancies. It usually appears between 20 – 28 weeks (5th – 7th month) of gestation and usually resolves after delivery of the baby. Gestational diabetes is similar to type 2 diabetes in that there is both insulin resistance and an insufficiency of insulin secretion. Insulin resistance in pregnancy is caused by anti-insulin effect of some of the pregnancy hormones. Gestational diabetes results when the mother’s production of insulin is not enough to overcome the effect of these hormones. Following are the risk factors for gestational diabetes: 1) Strong family history of diabetes especially in parents 2) Obesity (BMI > 30 kg / m2) 3) Advanced maternal age (women above 35 years of age) 4) Gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies 5) History of large baby (i.e. birth weight more than 3.5 Kg) 6) History of Polycystic ovary disease (PCOD), Infertility treatment etc. Women with high risk should be screened as soon as possible after pregnancy has been confirmed & again at 24 – 28 weeks of gestation. Screening & diagnosis of gestational diabetes is done with the help of oral glucose challenge test or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Complications and risks of gestational diabetes : • Risks to mother: o High blood pressure o Polyhydramnios (excess of amniotic fluid) o Caesarian Section (due to large size of the baby) o Mother has high risk of developing gestational diabetes in subsequent pregnancies & type 2 diabetes in future. • Risks to baby: o Large baby (as excess blood sugar is transported to the baby, baby secretes more insulin to lower this glucose load which is responsible for large size of the baby) o Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) immediately after birth o Complic Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Causes Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is one of the most common pregnancy complications, and it affects between 2 to 10 percent of all pregnancies. This condition is characterized by high blood sugar that starts ( or is first diagnosed) during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes typically goes away after your baby is born. However, over 50 percent of women who experience gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. To understand how gestational diabetes develops, you have to understand a few basic principles of how your endocrine system works. When you eat, most of your food breaks down into a type of sugar called glucose, which enters your bloodstream. Insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas) opens your cells so they can use glucose as energy. When you're pregnant, the hormones produced by the placenta inhibits the effects of insulin. As a result, your cells aren't able to respond to insulin as well as they did previously. To compensate for this resistance to insulin, a healthy woman's pancreas will respond by secreting more insulin. You may actually require three times the normal amount of insulin to support a healthy pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs when your pancreas can't keep up with the increased insulin demand. When you don't have enough insulin, blood glucose can't leave your bloodstream and be changed into energy. As a result, glucose rises to high levels in your blood – which causes gestational diabetes. Untreated Gestational Diabetes and Your Baby Gestational diabetes usually doesn't begin until the middle half of pregnancy – often around 20 to 24 weeks pregnant. At this stage of pregnancy, your baby's body has already been formed. Because of this fact, gestational diabetes doesn't cause the type of birth defect Continue reading >>

Infant Of Diabetic Mother

Infant Of Diabetic Mother

Women may have diabetes during pregnancy in 2 ways: Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar (diabetes) that starts or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. If the diabetes is not well controlled during pregnancy, the baby is exposed to high blood sugar levels. This can affect the baby and mom during the pregnancy, at the time of birth, and after birth. Infants who are born to mothers with diabetes are often larger than other babies. Larger infants make vaginal birth harder. This can increase the risk for nerve injuries and other trauma during birth. Also, C-sections are more likely. The infant is more likely to have periods of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) shortly after birth, and during first few days of life. Mothers with poorly controlled diabetes are also more likely to have a miscarriage or stillborn child. If the mother had diabetes before her pregnancy, her infant has an increased risk of birth defects if the disease was not well controlled. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes During Pregnancy

Type 2 Diabetes During Pregnancy

There’s lots of good news these days for pregnant women with type 2 diabetes (a condition in which the body doesn’t respond as it should to insulin). In fact, with the right medical help and diligent self-care, you have about the same excellent chances of having a successful pregnancy and a healthy baby as any other expectant mom. The key to managing type 2 diabetes during pregnancy? Achieving normal blood glucose levels six months before conception and maintaining those levels throughout the nine months following it. So if you’ve been on top of keeping your diabetes under control, it’s more important than ever to continue your routine now that there are two of you on board. Here's what to think about if you're heading into pregnancy with type 2 diabetes: Your care team How does diabetes affect babies during pregnancy? If you have type 2 diabetes, you already have higher levels of glucose circulating in your blood; issues can come up if your blood sugar levels aren’t well monitored and managed. That’s because extra sugar can be transferred to baby while you're expecting — and a fetus that’s served too much glucose reacts by producing an increased supply of insulin (which can result in a too-large baby and other complications). READ MORE: Gestational Diabetes Finding your pregnancy and diabetes care team Be prepared: You’ll have a lot more prenatal visits than other expectant moms and will probably be given more doctors’ orders to follow (all for a good cause). So it’s a good idea to get your medical team in place as soon as you think you might want to get pregnant. The OB or midwife who supervises your pregnancy should have plenty of experience caring for diabetic moms-to-be, and he or she should work together with the doctor who has been in charge Continue reading >>

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Diabetes that begins during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. This condition affects 5 to 9 percent of all pregnancies in the United States, and it is becoming more common, according to a July 2009 article in "American Family Physician." Pregnancy also aggravates preexisting type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar levels that are consistently too high during pregnancy can cause problems for both mother and infant. Video of the Day Diabetes during pregnancy increases the likelihood of congenital malformations, or birth defects, in infants, particularly if your blood glucose is poorly controlled for the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. High blood sugars also contribute to excessive fetal growth, which makes labor and delivery difficult and increases the likelihood of infant fractures or nerve injuries. Large infants are more likely to be delivered via cesarean section. Newborns of diabetic mothers are at risk for respiratory distress, jaundice and dangerously low blood calcium or glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugars exceed specified levels following two glucose tolerance tests. The first test, usually performed between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy, involves drinking 50 g of a sugar solution and checking your blood glucose one hour later. If your level is above 130 mg/dL, your doctor will probably order a second glucose tolerance test that measures your blood glucose when you are fasting and then each hour for 2 to 3 hours after the test. A fasting glucose higher than 95 mg/dL, a one-hour level above 180 mg/dL, a two-hour level over 155 mg/dL or a three-hour measurement over 140 mg/dL is diagnostic of gestational diabetes. For pregnant women without diabetes, average fasting glucose levels vary between 69 mg/dL and 75 mg/ Continue reading >>

Pre-existing Diabetes And Pregnancy

Pre-existing Diabetes And Pregnancy

If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and are planning a family, you should plan your pregnancy as much as possible. Controlling your blood sugars before conception and throughout pregnancy gives you the best chance of having a trouble-free pregnancy and birth and a healthy baby. If you have diabetes and your pregnancy is unplanned, there’s still plenty you can do to give your baby the best start in life. The information on this page is for women who have diabetes before becoming pregnant. If you develop diabetes during pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. Planned pregnancy Visit your doctor or diabetes educator at least 6 months before you start trying to fall pregnant, if you can. You will be given advice and guidance on controlling your blood sugars as tightly as possible, and taking necessary supplements like folate. You may also be advised to change medications. If you are healthy and your diabetes is well controlled when you become pregnant, you have a good a chance of having a normal pregnancy and birth. Diabetes that is not well controlled during pregnancy can affect your health long-term and can also be risky for your baby. Unplanned pregnancy Not everybody can plan their pregnancy. If you have diabetes and think you might be pregnant, see your doctor as soon as you can. Your healthcare team You may be cared for by a team of health professionals including: an obstetrician who can handle high risk pregnancies a specialist experienced in diabetes care during pregnancy, who may be an endocrinologist or who may be a general physician a diabetes educator to help you manage your diabetes a dietician who can provide dietary advice at all the different stages - before conception, while pregnant and after the birth a midwife who is experienced in all aspects Continue reading >>

What Might Go Wrong In The Third Trimester?

What Might Go Wrong In The Third Trimester?

Weeks 28 through 40 bring the arrival of the third trimester. This exciting time is definitely the home stretch for expectant mothers, but it also presents a time where complications can occur. Just as each trimester can bring its own challenges, so can the third trimester. Prenatal care is especially important in the third trimester because the types of complications that can arise at this time are more easily managed if detected early. You’ll likely start visiting your obstetrician every other week from 28 to 36 weeks, then once per week until your little one arrives. According to the American Diabetes Association, as many as 9.2 percent of pregnant women have gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs because the hormonal changes of pregnancy make it more difficult for your body to effectively use insulin. When insulin cannot do its job of lowering blood sugar to normal levels, the result is abnormally high glucose (blood sugar) levels. Most women have no symptoms. While this condition is usually not dangerous for the mother, it poses several problems for the fetus. Specifically, macrosomia (excessive growth) of the fetus can increase the likelihood of cesarean delivery and the risk of birth injuries. When glucose levels are well-controlled, macrosomia is less likely. At the beginning of the third trimester (between weeks 24 and 28), all women should get tested for gestational diabetes. During the glucose tolerance test (also known as the screening glucose challenge test), you will consume a drink that contains a certain amount of glucose (sugar) and at a specified time later your doctor will test your blood sugar levels. For the oral glucose tolerance test, your blood sugar levels are checked after you have fasted for at least eight hours and you’ve drank Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Month 7: Gestational Diabetes

Pregnancy Month 7: Gestational Diabetes

Month 7 brought in some complications and a lot of restrictions. Gestational diabetes is a very common complication faced by many women. You can read this link on Gestational diabetes for more information. I wrote down a questionnaire myself when I was having GD and was searching the net for information. I have answered the questions based on my experience during pregnancy. When were you diagnosed with gestational diabetes? In my 7th month of pregnancy, I was diagnosed with GD (Gestational Diabetes). What were the symptoms you experienced during this phase? I had no symptoms, pain or any sort of discomfort before or after the diagnosis was done. The diagnosis was made based on a blood sugar test and further confirmed with a glucose screening test. I was put on medication and a strict diet regimen. Could you have somehow avoided gestational diabetes? I am not sure. I have a strong family history of Type-2 diabetes and Gestational diabetes. However, I did make a lot of wrong eating choices during my initial pregnancy days and I also had a rapid weight gain (of about 6 kgs) in a single month after my food choices went hay-wire. What caused the problem? – I do not know! Did you have to take insulin injections? Thankfully no! I controlled my diet strictly and took my medicines on time. It was fruitful and I never took any insulin injection. Typically what readings did you see post lunch/dinner? Typically post food reading used to be 110. The goal from my doctor was <110 post food. I always maintained it. The highest reading I got was 135 and I was taken to task after this reading by my mom and doctor. What helped you measure blood sugar reading? Did you always go to a lab? No, I had the equipment at home to take the blood sugar reading. The equipment and strips are easily Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Pregnancy Puts Baby At Risk

High Blood Sugar In Pregnancy Puts Baby At Risk

Print Font: CHICAGO — The higher a pregnant woman’s level of blood sugar, the greater the risk to her newborn — whether the mother has diabetes or not, the largest study on the problem suggests. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. The findings released Friday may lead to more women being diagnosed with diabetes during pregnancy and given stricter diet advice or medication to lower blood sugar. The research involved more than 23,000 pregnant women in nine countries. It found a surprisingly strong relationship between the blood sugar levels of the women and the rate of big babies and first-time Caesarean sections, said lead investigator Dr. Boyd Metzger of Northwestern University. The newborns also were more likely to have low blood sugar levels and high insulin levels if their mothers’ blood sugar levels were higher. The problems can lead to obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure later in life. Risks for large babies Large babies risk shoulder damage and other injuries if delivered vaginally and lead to more C-sections, which also pose health risks to mothers and babies. Large babies were defined in the study as those bigger than 90 percent of those born in the local population, so large Thai babies would be smaller than large U.S. babies. Researchers reported the findings Friday at the American Diabetes Association’s annual scientific meeting. The higher the mother’s blood sugar, the more Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Sometimes pregnancy causes the blood sugar to rise in women who do not have diabetes. This is called gestational diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. For further information about diabetes, see separate leaflets called Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Sometimes pregnancy causes the blood sugar to rise in women who do not have diabetes. This is called gestational diabetes (see below). How does pregnancy affect diabetes? How does pregnancy affect diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Pregnancy makes the body need more insulin to control the levels of sugar (glucose) in the body. Therefore, women with diabetes usually need more treatments to control their blood sugar when t Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugars In Pregnancy

Normal Blood Sugars In Pregnancy

I have until now avoided discussing the issue of what normal blood sugars should be in pregnancy because it looked like gynecologists were being more aggressive with blood sugar control during pregnancy then other doctors. Blood sugar control is particularly important in pregnancy because a fetus that is exposed to continually high blood sugars will experience significant changes in the way that its genes express which will affect its blood sugar metabolism for the rest of its life. High blood sugar will also make babies very large, which poses problems when it is time for delivery, some life-threatening. Blood sugars are lower in pregnant women because there is a higher blood volume during pregnancy, but it is starting to look like the targets gynecologists have been recommending, which would have been excellent for non-diabetic women are considerably higher than normal. This was made clear by a new meta-study that analyzed a series of studies of the blood sugars of a wide range of normal pregnant women using Continuous Glucose Monitoring, home testing, and hospital lab results. It makes it clear that the current targets for pregnancy are probably too high. Here is the full text version of the meta-study: Patterns of Glycemia in Normal Pregnancy: Should the current therapeutic targets be challenged? Teri L. Hernandez, et al. Diabetes Care July 2011 vol. 34 no. 7 1660-1668. It concludes that the following appear to be truly normal blood sugars for pregnant women: AVERAGE BLOOD SUGARS IN NORMAL PREGNANT WOMEN Fasting: 70.9 ± 7.8 mg/dl (3.94 mmol/L ± .43) One Hour Post Meal: 108.9 ± 12.9 mg/dl (6.05 ± .72 mmol/L) Two Hours Post Meal: 99.3 ±10.2 mg/dl (5.52 ± .57 mmol/L ) A commentary published in this month's Diabetes Care gives more insight into the importance of t Continue reading >>

The 7th Month-pregnancy And Diabetes

The 7th Month-pregnancy And Diabetes

Saturday marked the start of my 32nd week or month 8! I was told at my last OB appointment that I will be induced at week 39 so I have less than 7 weeks to go! It might sound crazy but I actually feel like the days/weeks/months are flying by now. I can’t believe since I last wrote about my pregnancy I was beginning the third trimester and now 4 weeks later, I’m through with weeks 28-31 (or the 7th month). At lot has happened in the last month. My husband and I finished up our Childbirth class and I think I’m more scared now than I was before, but at least I know a little more about what to expect. We took a Newborn Care and Safety class so I now know how to give a baby a bath among other things. My husband now knows how to hold a baby. I had my baby shower last weekend and got a lot of great things for the baby and as a result, my nursery is getting closer to completion. My neighbors are throwing us a baby shower on Friday night so I think after that we are going to go to the stores and buy what is remaining for baby so hopefully by next week, we will be all set up. We did buy our car seat and have it installed so we are ready to bring baby home from the hospital. I’ve been in the third trimester for about four weeks and it is not as great as the second trimester. I have been so exhausted that I need to take like a 2 hour nap everyday. Thankfully, I work from home with a flexible schedule so I can afford to take a nap everyday. I have also had horrendous back pain. The weird thing is that it isn’t my lower back, it’s my upper back. I’ve been doing yoga and that sort of helps but doesn’t eliminate it. For the majority of the day, I can’t get comfortable. However, exhaustion and back pain are the only major issues I am having right now so I can’t compl Continue reading >>

Hi, I Am On My 7th Month Of Pregnancy And My Suger Level Is Quite High.

Hi, I Am On My 7th Month Of Pregnancy And My Suger Level Is Quite High.

My sugar level is 148 and doctor has suggested me to control the same. I usually have 2 cups of tea, fruits (mostly pomigranate and apples), dry fruits (cashews and nuts) and proper servings of calcium. I need to know what should I change in my diet to keep myself at the balanced sugar level. Thanks. Watching your intake of carbohydrates (fresh and particularly dried fruit can have a lot). Fresh vegetables typically have fewer and are a "freebie" from the perspective of managing gestational diabetes. And balance out your carbohydrates with better sources of fats and protein. Cheese sticks and nuts can be good additions to your snacks. I'm diabetic & 148 isn't "high" for me. My doctor is actually telling me to target for 140. But I guess for someone who isn't already diabetic before pregnancy the target may be different. What are you using in your tea? If you add table sugar try using Splenda. Also, even though fruits are good for you, they do have natural sugars, so you don't want to over do it in that department. The nuts are the only thing I see listed that have protein which is also important for sugar balance. Are you vegetarian or did you just not list the meats you eat? Cheese & beans also have high protein content. Good luck. I have gest. diabetes. My OB wants my number to be less than 130 after an hour of eating. If I have a piece of fruit I have to add a protein. Just watch your carb intake. Recent questions in Nutrition & Weight Continue reading >>

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