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Sucrose Vs Glucose Yeast Fermentation

Rate Of Reactions Of Yeast And Glucose, Yeast And Sucrose, And Yeast And Lactose

Rate Of Reactions Of Yeast And Glucose, Yeast And Sucrose, And Yeast And Lactose

RATE OF REACTIONS OF YEAST AND GLUCOSE, YEAST AND SUCROSE, AND YEAST AND LACTOSE Aim: The aim of this experiment is to compare the rate of reactions of the reaction of yeast with the three different carbohydrates, namely glucose, sucrose, and lactose. Hypothesis: The rate of reaction should be fastest in the reaction between yeast and sucrose, since sucrose is broken down to two molecules of glucose, thereby giving more glucose for the yeast to act on. Therefore, for the same amount of glucose and sucrose, there will ultimately be double the amount of glucose in sucrose because the yeast will break down the sucrose into two times the amount of glucose. Theory: The three carbohydrates being used in this experiment fall into two categories; monosaccharide and disaccharide. Glucose is a monosaccharide, whereas sucrose and lactose are disaccharides. ...read more. Yeast + Glucose ==> Ethanol + Carbon dioxide C6H12O6 ==> 2C2H5OH + 2CO2 Temperature/ C Number of Carbon Dioxide bubbles released in the reaction in 5 minutes Glucose Lactose Sucrose 20 0 0 0 25 0 0 0 29 0 0 6 35 2 0 54 40 20 0 180 45 100 0 285 52 75 0 215 60 0 0 0 Planning: To carry out this experiment, I have to measure the Data Collection: The data that had to be collected for this experiment was the number of carbon dioxide bubbles released in the reaction in five minutes' time. The rate of there action with different carbohydrates can then be measured and compared. Data Processing and Presentation: From the graph above, it can be observed that the lactose is not digested by yeast and thus no reaction occurs in that test-tube. ...read more. Some modifications in this experiment could be as follows: * A device that measures and provides the inside temperature of the actual solution should be included in the appa Continue reading >>

General Botany | Introduction

General Botany | Introduction

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this exercise you should be able to: 1. Understand the purpose of fermentation 2. Understand the chemical reaction of fermentation 3. Recognize the effects of organic substrates on fermentation 4. Recognize the effects of environment on fermentation. 5. Understand the process of aerobic cellular respiration The process by which cells release energy stored in carbohydrates is called cellular respiration. Although, the energy is stored in carbohydrates, the cell cannot directly use this energy. Instead the energy must be released from the carbohydrates and converted to a usable form; ATP. The aerobic metabolic pathway for these conversions consists of four main steps: Glycolysis, Pyruvate Oxidation, Krebs Cycle and Electron Transport/Chemiosmosis. When oxygen is in low supply, the organisms switch to a different pathway called fermentation. In animals and some bacteria, the fermentation pathway is called Lactic Acid Fermentation. The end products of this pathway are ATP and Lactic Acid. In plants, fungi and some bacteria, the fermentation pathway is called Ethanol Fermentation. The end products of this pathway are carbond dioxide, ATP and Ethanol (an alcohol). In switching to fermentation much less ATP is produced than aerobic respiration (2 ATP vs. 38 ATP per molecule of glucose) Ethanol fermentation and other forms of fermentation are the basis for a number of industrial, pharmaceutical, and dietary applications including alcohol production, other chemical production and bread making. The summary equation for the fermentation of glucose by yeast is as follows: The above chemical formula is overly simplified. The process is a complex metabolic process, which involves numerous enzymes and a series of chemical reactions. Fermentation of frui Continue reading >>

Sucrose Vs. Glucose In Yeast Fermentation

Sucrose Vs. Glucose In Yeast Fermentation

Sucrose vs. Glucose in YEast Fermentation Post by Cris1111 Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:37 pm I recently conducted an experiment in which I tested different substrates in yeast and which ones would be metabolized most efficiently. I mixed malt syrup (maltose), corn syrup (glucose), and refined sugar (sucrose) into different bottles that each contained one cup of warm water. I sealed each of the bottles that contained the solutions, with balloons (as a means of collecting the C02 produced) and waited for a total of 2hrs. After this time, however, I noticed that the yeast in the solution with the sucrose was metabolizing the quickest, and produced the most C02 (the most inflated balloon). In one of your earlier posts, I read a question pertaining to this same topic, in which one of the answers talked about how glucose would be the most effective substrate. I was just wondering, if this is the case, why is it that I observed differently; the results I collected show that sucrose solution allowed for the balloon to become the most inflated. The circumfrence of the balloon with the glucose solution was 11.8cm, while the balloon for the solution with sucrose was 52cm.... Did I do something wrong? Here's the problem, if you want to compare them you'd need the same concentration of sugars in each. And by concentration I mean # of molecules of sucrose/glucose/maltose etc. The problem is you have no idea what the original concentration inside the bottles are and therefore you don't know how much food you've fed to the yeast. Assuming one solution is twice as concentrated as the other, you'd invariably get the higher results for that sample. Assuming the same energy content for each, you can probably look at how much carbs/sugars are in each "serving" in the nutritional info. That should g Continue reading >>

Yeast And Fermentation: Sucrose Vs. Glucose Bloemen, V., Sommen

Yeast And Fermentation: Sucrose Vs. Glucose Bloemen, V., Sommen

Yeast and fermentation: Sucrose vs. GlucoseBloemen, V., Sommen, C. van derGymnasium Haganum, The Netherlands (April 2010)SummaryYeasts are eukaryotic micro-organisms classified in the kingdom Fungi. Yeast has the ability toferment glucose into ethanol and carbon dioxide. Yeast, being part of the fungus family, operatesin an anaerobe environment. Sucrose is a disaccharide and hydrolyzed into glucose and fructose.In the experiment by Slaa etc. they begin with sucrose, but for the fermentation they use onlyglucose. This implies that the presence of fructose does not serve any purpose in thefermentation process. However, seeing that fructose and glucose have the same molecularformula, this does not seem very likely. The amount of carbon dioxide produced during thefermentation process was observed first when using sucrose (glucose + fructose) andafterwards when using only glucose. This resulted in the conclusion that sucrose produces ahigher amount of carbon dioxide, and therefore also a higher amount of ethanol, then when onlyglucose is used. This means that fructose also produces carbon dioxide. However, the molar ratioof the two amounts does not equal 1:2, expected when fructose would produce the same amountof carbon dioxide as glucose, but 1:1,6. This might be caused by the fact that fructose has anotheroptimal temperature than glucose. 2010 Vera Bloemen and Cecile van der Sommen. All rights reserved.IntroductionThe regular sugar from the stores is noglucose, but is a disaccharide, a sugarcomposed of two different monosaccharides.This regular sugar is called sucrose(C12H22O11). Before the fermentation of glucoseto ethanol starts, first the sucrose has to behydrolyzed. One molecule of sucrose reactswith one molecule of water. This division takesplace under influence of i Continue reading >>

How Does Sugar Affect Yeast Growth?

How Does Sugar Affect Yeast Growth?

Yeast is a fungus and needs a supply of energy for its living and growth. Sugar supplies this energy (your body also gets much of its energy from sugar and other carbohydrates). Yeast can use oxygen to release the energy from sugar (like you can) in the process called "respiration". So, the more sugar there is, the more active the yeast will be and the faster its growth (up to a certain point - even yeast cannot grow in very strong sugar - such as honey). However, if oxygen is short (like in the middle of a ball of dough), then yeast can still release energy from sugar, but in these conditions, its byproducts are alcohol and carbon dioxide. It is this carbon dioxide gas which makes the bubbles in dough (and therefore in bread), causing the dough to rise. Alcohol is a poison (for yeast as well as for people) and so the yeast is not able to grow when the alcohol content gets too high. This is why wine is never more than about 12% alcohol. WHY does an excess of sugar inhibit the yeast? My guess would be that the osmotic concentration of the sugar gets so great that the yeast is unable to get enough water for growth. As fresh yeast is more than 90% water, the single substance most needed for growth is water. As osmotic concentration increases, the water potential of the sugar solution gets more and more negative until it reaches a point where is lower than the water potential of the yeast cell contents and water tends to move OUT of the cell rather than IN. I do not know whether yeast cells are able to take up water actively, by expenditure of metabolic energy to pump the water against the water potential gradient. I imagine that up to a certain concentration, the limiting factor is the amount of sugar available for respiration and synthesis of cell materials with the yeas Continue reading >>

Glucose Fructose And Sucrose Were Capable Of Being Fermented By Yeast Because | Course Hero

Glucose Fructose And Sucrose Were Capable Of Being Fermented By Yeast Because | Course Hero

Glucose Fructose and Sucrose were capable of being fermented by yeast Because Glucose fructose and sucrose were capable of being 100% (2) 2 out of 2 people found this document helpful This preview shows page 2 - 3 out of 7 pages. Glucose, Fructose, and Sucrose were capable of being fermented by yeast. Because Sucrose(disaccharide) was a common sugar and made of Glucose (monosaccharide) and Fructose(monosaccharide), these three carbohydrates were fermented by yeast whereas other typescannot. Therefore, disaccharide and monosaccharide of same sugar could be fermented. Glucoseand Lactose had relative rates of fermentation (6.2 mL and 5.8 mL, respectively) while Fructoseproduced highest amount of CO2in fermentation (11.9 mL). Order of the carbohydrates fromfastest to slowest rate was Fructose (11.9 mL), Glucose (6.2 mL), and Sucrose (5.8 mL).The carbohydrates that Torulopsis cremosis could ferment (Lactose, Glucose, andGalactose) were different from carbohydrates that Saccharomyces cerevisiae could ferment(Sucrose, Glucose, and Fructose) because components of Lactose were Glucose and Galactosewhile components of Sucrose were Glucose and Fructose. The order of the rate of fermentationin Torulopsis cremosis was Lactose, Glucose, and Galactose. It was different from rate of samethree carbohydrates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fructose and Glucose and Sucrose,respectively). All yeast did not use the same kinds of carbohydrates equally well because Lactose(disaccharide) in Torulopsis cremosis got fastest rate while Sucrose (disaccharide) inSacharomyces got slowest rate in all three carbohydrates. Glucose, oil, albumin, and DNA were 4 organic macromolecules were tested. BesideGlucose, no other macromolecules were fermented by yeast because the graph showed only oneslope of Gluco Continue reading >>

Brewing Sugars

Brewing Sugars

After doing some research on the topic of brewing sugars, I have put together a quick article that sums up all of the things I have learned. Grains are soaked in approx. 150 degree water to extract these sugars, this is called mashing. Next the fermentation process uses yeast to convert these sugars in the wort into alcohol and CO2. The common sugars associated with brewing, there prevalence in wort, and how yeast breaks them down are described below. Building Blocks Here are the very basic things to know about the sugars extracted from grains during brewing. Sugar is basically a ringed structure made up of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen A sugar ring is named by how many carbon atoms are attached to it. Common brewing sugars, such as glucose and fructose are made up of a single hexose (6 carbon atoms, chemical formula C6H12O6) A single hexose is called a monosaccharide. Common monosaccharides that existing in brewing sugars are glucose, fructose, and galactose. When two monosaccharides join they form another sugar structure called a disaccharide. Common disaccharides that exist in brewing sugars are sucrose and maltose. Sucrose is made up of a glucose molecule and fructose molecule, while maltose is made up of two glucose molecules. When three monosaccharides join they form another sugar structure called a trisaccharide. The most common trisaccharide that exists in brewing sugars is maltotriose, which is made up of three glucose molecules. When monosaccharides join in structures of 4 or more the resulting structures are called dextrin, which is not fermentable by beer yeast. Pure dextrin is actually added to some beers during the boil to increase body in the final product, our Northern English Brown ale is a good example. Common Brewing Sugars Breakdown Monosaccharides †Continue reading >>

Sucrose And Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: A Relationship Most Sweet

Sucrose And Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: A Relationship Most Sweet

Sucrose and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a relationship most sweet Department of Chemical Engineering, University of So Paulo, So Paulo-SP, 05424-970, Brazil School of Food Engineering, University of Campinas, Campinas-SP, 13083-862, Brazil Search for other works by this author on: School of Food Engineering, University of Campinas, Campinas-SP, 13083-862, Brazil Search for other works by this author on: Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianpolis-SC, 88040-900, Brazil Search for other works by this author on: Department of Chemical Engineering, University of So Paulo, So Paulo-SP, 05424-970, Brazil School of Food Engineering, University of Campinas, Campinas-SP, 13083-862, Brazil Corresponding author: University of Campinas, School of Food Engineering, Rua Monteiro Lobato 80, Campinas-SP 13083-862, Brazil. Tel: +55-19-35214031; Search for other works by this author on: FEMS Yeast Research, Volume 16, Issue 1, 1 February 2016, fov107, Wesley Leoricy Marques, Vijayendran Raghavendran, Boris Ugarte Stambuk, Andreas Karoly Gombert; Sucrose and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a relationship most sweet, FEMS Yeast Research, Volume 16, Issue 1, 1 February 2016, fov107, Sucrose is an abundant, readily available and inexpensive substrate for industrial biotechnology processes and its use is demonstrated with much success in the production of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which naturally evolved to efficiently consume sugars such as sucrose, is one of the most important cell factories due to its robustness, stress tolerance, genetic accessibility, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse. This minireview is focused on sucrose metabolism in S. cerevisiae, a rather unexplored subject in the scientific l Continue reading >>

Yeast Respiration

Yeast Respiration

Students are often confused by the term isomer. Eventually, they memorize a definition and know that isomers share atomic composition, but vary in their structures. What are the consequences for organisms? Can organisms use any molecule for energy as long as they have the same chemical formulas? Or does the structure of each molecule affect the usefulness of a molecule? In this investigation, it is determined that not all sugar is the same. Only certain configurations of sugar molecules can be used by yeast. Three Monomers Shown Below--Three Dimers Shown Above 1. The fundamental life processes of plants and animals depend on a variety of chemical reactions that occur in specialized areas of the organisms cells. As a basis for understanding this concept: b. Students know enzymes are proteins that catalyze biochemical reactions without altering the reaction equilibrium and the activities of enzymes depend on the temperature, ionic conditions, and the pH of the surroundings. g. Students know the role of the mitochondria in making stored chemical-bond energy available to cells by completing the breakdown of glucose to carbon h. Students know most macromolecules (polysaccharides, nucleic acids, proteins, lipids) in cells and organisms are synthesized from a small collection of simple 1. Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other four strands, students should develop their own questions and perform d. Formulate explanations by using logic and evidence. Fill the six eudiometers with colored tap water (colored water is easier to read). Invert each in a 600mL or larger beaker on a ring stand. Create 10% solutions of each of the six sugars. (ad Continue reading >>

Sucrose Fermentation By Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Lacking Hexose Transport.

Sucrose Fermentation By Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Lacking Hexose Transport.

Sucrose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking hexose transport. Departamento de Bioqumica, Centro de Cincias Biolgicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianpolis, SC 88040-900, Brazil. Sucrose is the major carbon source used by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during production of baker's yeast, fuel ethanol and several distilled beverages. It is generally accepted that sucrose fermentation proceeds through extracellular hydrolysis of the sugar, mediated by the periplasmic invertase, producing glucose and fructose that are transported into the cells and metabolized. In the present work we analyzed the contribution to sucrose fermentation of a poorly characterized pathway of sucrose utilization by S. cerevisiae cells, the active transport of the sugar through the plasma membrane and its intracellular hydrolysis. A yeast strain that lacks the major hexose transporters (hxt1-hxt7 and gal2) is incapable of growing on or fermenting glucose or fructose. Our results show that this hxt-null strain is still able to ferment sucrose due to direct uptake of the sugar into the cells. Deletion of the AGT1 gene, which encodes a high-affinity sucrose-H(+) symporter, rendered cells incapable of sucrose fermentation. Since sucrose is not an inducer of the permease, expression of the AGT1 must be constitutive in order to allow growth of the hxt-null strain on sucrose. The molecular characterization of active sucrose transport and fermentation by S. cerevisiae cells opens new opportunities to optimize yeasts for sugarcane-based industrial processes. Continue reading >>

Glucose, Fructose, And Sucrose - How Different Sugars Ferment

Glucose, Fructose, And Sucrose - How Different Sugars Ferment

Glucose, fructose, and sucrose - how different sugars ferment Discussion in ' 'Non Beer' Brewing ' started by TimT , 14/9/14 . As folks on this forum will know (because sometimes I just don't shut up about it), we have bees, and over the years we've had them I've noticed quite a lot of variability in between the honeys produced from month to month. Well, duh. No surprises there, obviously, especially since we live in the burbs and there's a wide variety of plants for our bees to forage from at any one time. But I'll ramble on a bit more about each batch of honey as it will allow me to frame my question a bit better. The first batch I can't remember much about, but I made a fairly straightforward mead from it that's come into its own about the start of this year. The honey fermented cleanly, gave the mead a strong spirituous vibe with a lingering sweetness that puts it into a dessert wine territory. The second batch of honey was quite different; dark and, frankly, a bit festy. It came from the oldest combs, the ones that we'd got from when we did the hive split. It's possible the area it came from had a lot of gums flowering, too (as opposed to where we are, full of fruit trees and European flower varieties). It created mead of a dark amber to almost-brown colour that again fermented to a kind of spirity liquor, again with a lingering sweetness. I mixed some of this batch of honey with plum juice to create quite a nice melomel that is now developing the distinctive toffeeish mead odours. I think the plum juice has mellowed out the flavour of the straight honey ferment quite nicely. The third (latest) batch of honey, different again. We collected this lot during autumn, and it tended to be quite finely coloured and smooth - much cleaner than the previous batch. Like othe Continue reading >>

How Does The Type Of Sugar (eg. Glucose, Lactos, Maltose And Fructose) Affect The Rate Of Fermentation In A Yeast Solution?

How Does The Type Of Sugar (eg. Glucose, Lactos, Maltose And Fructose) Affect The Rate Of Fermentation In A Yeast Solution?

How does the type of sugar (eg. Glucose, Lactos, Maltose and Fructose) affect the rate of fermentation in a yeast solution? Different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are used by bakers and brewers for fermentation to raise bread and produce alcohol. This species has a superior ability to perform fermentation making it perfect for use. The anaerobic respiration of yeasts is what is used by bakers. Yeasts react at different rates to different sugars. Lactose, sucrose and maltose are disaccharides while glucose, fructose and galactose are monosaccharides. When yeast is added to sucrose, the sucrose gets broken... Different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are used by bakers and brewers for fermentation to raise bread and produce alcohol. This species has a superior ability to perform fermentation making it perfect for use. The anaerobic respiration of yeasts is what is used by bakers. Yeasts react at different rates to different sugars. Lactose, sucrose and maltose are disaccharides while glucose, fructose and galactose are monosaccharides. When yeast is added to sucrose, the sucrose gets broken down into glucose and fructose and yeast is found to perform fermentation at the fastest rate. If sucrose and maltose are present in a solution, the yeast utilizes maltose which is made up of two molecules of glucose, only when the sucrose has been consumed. The rate of fermentation with maltose is slower than that with sucrose. Lactose is made up of one glucose and galactose. Yeast does not undergo fermentation when it is put into a solution containing lactose. Continue reading >>

Fermentation Flashcards | Quizlet

Fermentation Flashcards | Quizlet

How can we measure fermentation? which method is the best what is the purpose of the gas bag when doing a fermentation experiment? it must have an enzyme to break down that carb source to glucose for the organism to be able to use it as an energy source Most organisms are typically able to use more than 1 carbon source to obtain energy. However, it is only glucose which can be used directly for glycolysis. What is the key factor that determines whether or not an organism is capable of using that particular carbon source? glucose loss in anaerobic system, ethanol gain, or CO2 production; we used CO2 production because its the easiest In this experiment, we asked the question: can yeast use glucose, starch, lactose and sucrose as carbon sources? We sought to answer the question by measuring how much fermentation was being carried out by yeast. What are 2 possible ways in which one can measure the level of fermentation? Which one did we use and why? sucrose is glucose+fructose; yeast has the enzyme to convert fructose to glucose. So 1 mole of sucrose is like 2 miles of glucose hence you get more CO2 why would you expect more CO2 to be produced from 1M sucrose compared to 1M glucose? when we make the yeast solution, we add some glucose to activate it; thats what the yeast is using to make CO2 even in water Why do we see some CO2 production even with just water? because the system goes momentarily aerobic when the flask is unsealed and air gets in Right after we change one carb solution for another, we see a transient spike in CO2 production in the QUBIT graph. Why? Yeast does not have the enzyme that breaks starch or lactose down to glucose, so there is no glycolysis or fermentation with these carb sources. we did not see much CO2 produced with starch and lactose. Why? Lac Continue reading >>

Sugar Utilization By Yeast During Fermentation

Sugar Utilization By Yeast During Fermentation

, Volume 4, Issue4 , pp 315323 | Cite as Sugar utilization by yeast during fermentation When glucose and fructose are fermented separately, the uptake profiles indicate that both sugars are utilized at similar rates. However, when fermentations are conducted in media containing an equal concentration of glucose and fructose, glucose is utilized at approximately twice the rate of fructose. The preferential uptake of glucose also occurred when sucrose, which was first rapidly hydrolyzed into glucose and fructose by the action of the enzyme invertase, was employed as a substrate. Similar results were observed in the fermentation of brewer's wort and wort containing 30% sucrose and 30% glucose as adjuncts. In addition, the high levels of glucose in the wort exerted severe catabolite repression on maltose utilization in theSaccharmyces uvarum (carlsbergensis) brewing strain. Kinetic analysis of glucose and fructose uptake inSaccharomyces cerevisiae revealed aKm of 1.6 mM for glucose and 20 mM for fructose. Thus, the yeast strain has a higher affinity for glucose than fructose. Growth on glucose or fructose had no repressible effect on the uptake of either sugar. In addition, glucose inhibited fructose uptake by 60% and likewise fructose inhibited, glucose uptake by 40%. These results indicate that glucose and fructose share the same membrane transport components. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Bisson, L.F. and D.G. Fraenkel. 1983. Involvement of kinases in glucose and fructose uptake bySaccharomyces cerevisiae. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80: 17301734. Google Scholar Bisson, L.F. and D.G. Fraenkel. 1984. Expression of kinasedependent glucose uptake inSaccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Bacteriol. Continue reading >>

Why Do Yeast Ferment Sucrose Faster Than Glucose?

Why Do Yeast Ferment Sucrose Faster Than Glucose?

Why do yeast ferment sucrose faster than glucose? Shouldn't it be the other way round? I thought that since glucose is smaller, the yeast would ferment it quicker. Any ideas? Update: actually we did an experiment and turns out that yeast do ferment sucrose faster Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Sucrose is a disaccharide made of glucose and fructose. Before the yeast can utilize sucrose it must split it into its two sub sugars. Glucose will enter the the process of glycolysis and be changed into glucose 6 phosphate and then be changed to fructose 6 phosphate (2 steps). Fructose on the other hand skips step 1. Glucose alone has to start from the beginning while sucrose starts 1/2 of its sugars from the beginning giving it the edge. For the best answers, search on this site Sounds like a homework question that you should be researching yourself, but I'll answer it anyway. Yeast will ferment faster when fed glucose. This is because most living beings use glucose as a form of energy (even humans; we break down table sugar into glucose molecules to be able to use it). Sucrose is a combination of 2 glucose molecules. Sucrose has to be further metabolized/digested to break it down into glucose molecules. The yeast already fed glucose does not have to do this, therefore it ferments faster. Why do yeast ferment sucrose faster than glucose? Shouldn't it be the other way round? I thought that since glucose is smaller, the yeast would ferment it quicker. Any ideas? Source(s): yeast ferment sucrose faster glucose: yeast ferments glucose faster than sucrose. Glucose is the starting reactant of glycolysis, whereas sucrose first has to be converted to glucose. Sucrose is more easily combustible than glucose, making the release of energy quicker. I think th Continue reading >>

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