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Sucrose Vs Glucose

Compared To Sucrose, Previous Consumption Of Fructose And Glucose Monosaccharides Reduces Survival And Fitness Of Female Mice.

Compared To Sucrose, Previous Consumption Of Fructose And Glucose Monosaccharides Reduces Survival And Fitness Of Female Mice.

Generate a file for use with external citation management software. J Nutr. 2015 Mar;145(3):434-41. doi: 10.3945/jn.114.202531. Epub 2014 Dec 10. Compared to sucrose, previous consumption of fructose and glucose monosaccharides reduces survival and fitness of female mice. Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; [email protected] Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; and. Nutrition and Metabolism Center, Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA. Intake of added sugar has been shown to correlate with many human metabolic diseases, and rodent models have characterized numerous aspects of the resulting disease phenotypes. However, there is a controversy about whether differential health effects occur because of the consumption of either of the two common types of added sugar-high-fructose corn syrup (fructose and glucose monosaccharides; F/G) or table sugar (sucrose, a fructose and glucose disaccharide). We tested the equivalence of sucrose- vs. F/G-containing diets on mouse (Mus musculus) longevity, reproductive success, and social dominance. We fed wild-derived mice, outbred mice descended from wild-caught ancestors, a diet in which 25% of the calories came from either an equal ratio of F/G or an isocaloric amount of sucrose (both diets had 63% of total calories as carbohydrates). Exposure lasted 40 wk, starting at weaning (21 d of age), and then mice (104 females and 56 males) were released into organismal performances assays-seminatural enclosures where mice competed for territories, resources, and mates for 32 wk. Within enclosures all mice consumed the F/G diet. Females initially Continue reading >>

Sugars: The Difference Between Fructose, Glucose And Sucrose

Sugars: The Difference Between Fructose, Glucose And Sucrose

29/06/2016 7:43 AM AEST | Updated 15/07/2016 12:56 PM AEST Sugars: The Difference Between Fructose, Glucose And Sucrose We're not just confused, we're also misinformed. "Fructose is the worst for you." "No way, sucrose is the devil." "I don't eat any sugar." Sugar is confusing. While some people only use certain types of sugars, others dismiss them completely. But is this necessary, or even grounded? To help settle the confusion, we spoke to Alan Barclay -- accredited practising dietitian, spokesperson for the Dietitians Association of Australia and Chief Scientific Officer at the Glycemic Index Foundation . "All the sugars are used as a source of fuel, but there are subtle differences in the way they are digested and absorbed," Barclay said. "In foods in Australia, the most common sugars are monosaccharides (glucose, fructose and galactose), but mostly these are occurring as disaccharides (which are sucrose, lactose and maltose)." Monosaccharides and disaccharides are two kinds of simple sugars, which are a form of carbohydrate. Oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, on the other hand, contain more sugar combinations and are known as complex carbohydrates -- for example, whole grain breads, brown rice and sweet potatoes. Monosaccharides require the least effort by the body to break down, meaning they are available for energy more quickly than disaccharides. "Monosaccharides don't require any digestion and can be absorbed into the mouth," Barclay said. "The problem there is they can cause dental caries which is one of the primary reasons why we need to be careful of how much added sugar we're consuming." Glucose -- the body's main source of energy and is found in fruit such as pasta, whole grain bread, legumes and a range of vegetables. Fructose -- this 'fruit sugar' fo Continue reading >>

Evidence Shows Some Sugars Are Worse Than Others; Fructose Tops The List

Evidence Shows Some Sugars Are Worse Than Others; Fructose Tops The List

Evidence Shows Some Sugars Are Worse Than Others; Fructose Tops the List Written by Cameron Scott on January 29, 2015 Are all sugars created equal, or are some more likely to cause obesity and related diseases, including type 2 diabetes? A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2004 proposed that the growing use of high-fructose corn syrup as a sweetener in processed foods could be linked to ballooning rates of obesity. It launched a long, contentious scientific debate. A recently published paper in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings wont settle the issue, but it does pose a significant new challenge to those who believe that a sugar is a sugar is a sugar. The comprehensive literature review claims to show for the first time that, calorie for calorie, added sugars especially fructose are more damaging to the bodys metabolic systems than other carbohydrates and are more likely to lead to type 2 diabetes and obesity. Forty percent of all American adults have some sort of insulin resistance, said James DiNicolantonio, PharmD, an associate editor at BMJ Open Heart, who co-authored the paper with Dr. Sean Lucan of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. The paper argues that the most current guidelines for how much added sugar is safe to eat are grossly exaggerated. It suggests that just 5 to 10 percent of our total caloric intake should come from added sugar. That comes out to about 22 grams of sugar about half as much as a single can of soda. Related News: Soda Linked to Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic Why fructose, and why added sugar? All carbohydrates contain glucose. Some foods, notably fruits, also contain fructose. Fructose is sweeter than glucose, so its most often used as an added sugar in processed foods, whether in the form of high-fructose corn syr Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose?

What Is The Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose?

Sucrose, glucose and fructose are important carbohydrates, commonly referred to as simple sugars. Sugar is found naturally in whole foods and is often added to processed foods to sweeten them and increase flavor. Your tongue can't quite distinguish between these sugars, but your body can tell the difference. They all provide the same amount of energy per gram, but are processed and used differently throughout the body. Structure Simple carbohydrates are classified as either monosaccharides or disaccharides. Monosaccharides are the simplest, most basic units of carbohydrates and are made up of only one sugar unit. Glucose and fructose are monosaccharides and are the building blocks of sucrose, a disaccharide. Thus, disaccharides are just a pair of linked sugar molecules. They are formed when two monosaccharides are joined together and a molecule of water is removed -- a dehydration reaction. The most important monosaccharide is glucose, the body’s preferred energy source. Glucose is also called blood sugar, as it circulates in the blood, and relies on the enzymes glucokinase or hexokinase to initiate metabolism. Your body processes most carbohydrates you eat into glucose, either to be used immediately for energy or to be stored in muscle cells or the liver as glycogen for later use. Unlike fructose, insulin is secreted primarily in response to elevated blood concentrations of glucose, and insulin facilitates the entry of glucose into cells. Fructose is a sugar found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, and added to various beverages such as soda and fruit-flavored drinks. However, it is very different from other sugars because it has a different metabolic pathway and is not the preferred energy source for muscles or the brain. Fructose is only metabolized in the li Continue reading >>

Glucose Vs Sucrose In Oral Rehydration Solutions For Infants And Young Children With Rotavirus-associated Diarrhea.

Glucose Vs Sucrose In Oral Rehydration Solutions For Infants And Young Children With Rotavirus-associated Diarrhea.

Glucose vs sucrose in oral rehydration solutions for infants and young children with rotavirus-associated diarrhea. The use of oral rehydration solutions containing essential electrolytes and either glucose or sucrose of equal osmolality was compared in a double-blind sequential trial of 784 children with rotavirus-associated diarrhea treated at a center in rural Bangladesh. The oral fluid failure rate was 11.5% for the sucrose-containing solution group and 7.3% for the glucose-containing group (P = NS). Vomiting was a significantly more common cause of failure for the group treated with sucrose-containing oral rehydration solution and was associated with an increased rate of intake of the sweeter sucrose-containing solution. The purging rate was not different for the two groups. The oral fluid failure rates for children in the most underweight category (less than 60% of expected weight for age) were not different from those for other groups, although, as assessed by purging rate and initial dehydration, the stool losses of members of this group constituted a greater proportion of their body weight. Glucose is the preferred carbohydrate for oral electrolyte solutions, although sucrose can be substituted with only minimum loss of efficacy. Continue reading >>

Effects Of Sucrose, Glucose And Fructose On Peripheral And Central Appetite Signals.

Effects Of Sucrose, Glucose And Fructose On Peripheral And Central Appetite Signals.

Regul Pept. 2008 Oct 9;150(1-3):26-32. doi: 10.1016/j.regpep.2008.06.008. Epub 2008 Jun 26. Effects of sucrose, glucose and fructose on peripheral and central appetite signals. Department of Experimental Medical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. [email protected] In the Western world, consumption of soft drinks has increased the last three decades and is partly responsible for the epidemic-like increase in obesity. Soft drinks, originally sweetened by sucrose, are now sweetened by other caloric sweeteners, such as fructose. In this study, we investigated the short-term effect of sucrose, glucose or fructose solutions on food intake and body weight in rats, and on peripheral and central appetite signals. Rats received water containing either of the sugars and standard rat chow for two weeks. Rats receiving water alone and standard chow were controls. All rats offered the sugar solutions increased their total caloric intake. The increased caloric intake occurred despite the fact that the rats offered either of the sugar solutions consumed less chow. As a consequence of the increased caloric intake, the sugar-drinking rats had elevated serum levels of free fatty acids, triglycerides and cholesterol. In addition, consuming sugar solutions resulted in increased serum leptin, decreased serum PYY and down-regulated hypothalamic NPY mRNA. Serum ghrelin was increased in rats receiving fructose solution. Moreover, consumption of sucrose or fructose solution resulted in up-regulated hypothalamic CB1 mRNA. Hypothalamic POMC mRNA was down-regulated in rats receiving glucose or fructose. In conclusion, consumption of glucose, sucrose or fructose solution results in caloric overconsumption and body weight gain through activation of hunger signals and depression of sat Continue reading >>

Understanding Glucose, Fructose, And Sucrose

Understanding Glucose, Fructose, And Sucrose

Considered the allies and enemies of many diabetics, glucose, fructose and sucrose are important carbohydrates. Although your tongue can't quite tell the difference between these simple sugars, they each play a different role in the body. People living with diabetes should pay especially close attention to glucose, which directly affects blood sugar levels. Here's what you should know about these three common carbohydrates. Glucose Glucose is the most the important simple sugar in our metabolism. It is the body's preferred energy source. Your body processes most of the carbohydrates you eat into glucose, whether to be used immediately for energy or to be stored in muscle cells or the liver as glycogen for later use. Glucose is measured in milligrams per deciliters and levels within the bloodstream naturally fluctuate throughout the day and night. Blood glucose generally becomes low between meals and during exercise. The hormone insulin is responsible for keeping blood sugar at a healthy level. Insulin converts sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Unlike fructose, high blood concentrations of glucose trigger the release of insulin. Type 2 diabetes In Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, the body either does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin properly, which doctors call insulin resistance. In the early stages of Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces extra insulin to compensate, but over time it isn't able to sustain the overproduction. At this point, it becomes difficult for the body to keep blood glucose at normal levels. Type 1 diabetes People with Type 1 diabetes produce little or no insulin. Only about 5 percent of people with diabetes have this form of the disease, which is usually associated with children and Continue reading >>

All Sugars Aren't The Same: Glucose Is Better, Study Says

All Sugars Aren't The Same: Glucose Is Better, Study Says

Correction Appended: April 21, 2009 Think that all sugars are the same? They may all taste sweet to the tongue, but it turns out your body can tell the difference between glucose, fructose and sucrose, and that one of these sugars is worse for your health than the others. In the first detailed analysis comparing how our systems respond to glucose (which is made when the body breaks down starches such as carbohydrates) and fructose, (the type of sugar found naturally in fruits), researchers at the University of California Davis report in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that consuming too much fructose can actually put you at greater risk of developing heart disease and diabetes than ingesting similar amounts of glucose. In the study, 32 overweight or obese men and women were randomly assigned to drink 25% of their daily energy requirements in either fructose- or glucose-sweetened drinks. The researchers took pains to eliminate as many intruding factors as possible by asking the volunteers to commit to a 12-week program; for the first and last two weeks of the study, each subject lived at UCD's Clinical and Translational Science Center, where they underwent rigorous blood tests to determine their insulin and lipid levels, among other metabolic measures. (Take a quiz on eating smart.) Both groups gained similar amounts of weight by the end of the 12 weeks, but only the people drinking fructose-sweetened beverages with each meal showed signs of unhealthy changes in their liver function and fat deposits. In this group, the liver churned out more fat, while the subjects consuming similar amounts of glucose-sweetened drinks showed no such change. The fructose-drinking volunteers also were not as sensitive to insulin, the hormone released by the pancreas to capture and br Continue reading >>

Sucrose Vs Glucose

Sucrose Vs Glucose

When most people think of sugar, table sugar, or sucrose, comes to mind. However, your body prefers to use the simple sugar glucose as its primary energy source. Sucrose is made of linked molecules of the sugars glucose and fructose, another simple sugar commonly found in fruits. Though glucose and sucrose are very similar sugars, your body may respond to them in different ways. All carbohydrates are made from linking together molecules of three simple sugars: glucose, fructose and galactose. These three sugars are classified as monosaccharides, from the words for single and sugar. Sucrose is a disaccharide, composed of two linked simple sugars. All carbohydrates that you consume from foods are digested into monosaccharides before they are absorbed by your body. Sucrose is rapidly broken down into individual glucose and fructose molecules. Glucose The sugar reserve in your blood is glucose. Glycogen, the molecule that stores energy in your muscles and liver, is composed of long chains of glucose. If you consume too many carbohydrates in your diet, the high levels of blood glucose must be accounted for. After the energy stores in your body are refilled, excess sugar can be removed as waste or stored as fat. Sucrose Sucrose consists of equal parts glucose and fructose. Your body must convert fructose into glucose before you can use it for energy through a biochemical process called glycolysis. This is primarily accomplished in your liver. A high intake of sucrose, due to the fructose content, can be a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, due to the high concentration of sugar in the liver, according to a research study in the "Journal of Hepatology." Consuming pure glucose does not lead to an elevated risk of fatty liver disease. Insulin & Diabetes An elevat Continue reading >>

Sucrose, High-fructose Corn Syrup, And Fructose, Their Metabolism And Potential Health Effects: What Do We Really Know?

Sucrose, High-fructose Corn Syrup, And Fructose, Their Metabolism And Potential Health Effects: What Do We Really Know?

Sucrose, High-Fructose Corn Syrup, and Fructose, Their Metabolism and Potential Health Effects: What Do We Really Know? University of Central Florida Medical School, Orlando,FL and Rippe Lifestyle Institute, Shrewsbury, MA To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: Laboratory of Applied Physiology, Department of Health Professions, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL Search for other works by this author on: Advances in Nutrition, Volume 4, Issue 2, 1 March 2013, Pages 236245, James M. Rippe, Theodore J. Angelopoulos; Sucrose, High-Fructose Corn Syrup, and Fructose, Their Metabolism and Potential Health Effects: What Do We Really Know?, Advances in Nutrition, Volume 4, Issue 2, 1 March 2013, Pages 236245, Both controversy and confusion exist concerning fructose, sucrose, and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) with respect to their metabolism and health effects. These concerns have often been fueled by speculation based on limited data or animal studies. In retrospect, recent controversies arose when a scientific commentary was published suggesting a possible unique link between HFCS consumption and obesity. Since then, a broad scientific consensus has emerged that there are no metabolic or endocrine response differences between HFCS and sucrose related to obesity or any other adverse health outcome. This equivalence is not surprising given that both of these sugars contain approximately equal amounts of fructose and glucose, contain the same number of calories, possess the same level of sweetness, and are absorbed identically through the gastrointestinal tract. Research comparing pure fructose with pure glucose, although interesting from a scientific point of view, has limited applicatio Continue reading >>

Differences Between Glucose And Sucrose

Differences Between Glucose And Sucrose

Categorized under Science | Differences Between Glucose and Sucrose When one hears the terms glucose and sucrose, one automatically thinks of sugar and chemistry. These terms are common enough among chemists, food analysts, and those who check the nutritional content of chocolate or any other sugar-rich processed food. Chocolate and candy lovers are most likely familiar with sucrose, which is a common component of all sweets sold in the market. However, not everyone knows the differences between these two terms. Some people simply assume that glucose and sucrose are two sides of the same coin, as they both pertain to sugar. As a result, glucose and sucrose are often interchanged, and are treated as synonyms of sugar. When one gets to know these two terms better, however, the differences start to roll. Glucose and sucrose are not interchangeable terms. The only way to define and differentiate between these two terms would be via their chemical makeup. In formal chemistry terms, glucose is a monosaccharide known as C6H12O6 or C6(H2O)6. Glucose is a compound in the carbon group, and is considered as a hydrate, hence the term carbohydrate. Glucose has two forms, namely alpha and beta. On the other hand, sucrose is a disaccharide, a combination of fructose and glucose. Its formal chemical formula is known as C12(H2O)11. Sucrose is formed when the alpha form of glucose is mixed with fructose, which results in the loss of water and the formation of a disaccharide. Because of its nature as a monosaccharide, glucose is easier for the body to break down and process as compared to sucrose. Sucrose, a disaccharide, is digested at a slower rate because it has a more complex chemical form. Glucose, a simple sugar, is broken down and absorbed more efficiently than sucrose. Because of Continue reading >>

Effect Of Glucose, Sucrose And Fructose On Plasma Glucose And Insulin Responsesin Normal Humans: Comparison With White Bread.

Effect Of Glucose, Sucrose And Fructose On Plasma Glucose And Insulin Responsesin Normal Humans: Comparison With White Bread.

1. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1998 Dec;52(12):924-8. Effect of glucose, sucrose and fructose on plasma glucose and insulin responsesin normal humans: comparison with white bread. (1)Department of Nutritional Science, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. OBJECTIVE: To determine the plasma glucose and insulin responses of various dosesof glucose, sucrose, fructose and white bread in normal human subjects.DESIGN: Plasma glucose and insulin were measured before and at various timesafter 8 subjects ate 13 different test meals in randomized order on separate daysafter an overnight fast. Test meals consisted of 500 ml of tea or water to which was added either nothing, 25, 50, or 100 g of glucose or sucrose, 25 or 50 gfructose, 50 g glucose plus 50 g fructose, or a 25, 50 or 100 g carbohydrateportion of white bread. The glycaemic (GI) and insulinaemic index (II) values of the sugars were calculated by expressing the incremental areas under the plasmaglucose and insulin curves (AUC) after glucose, sucrose and fructose as apercentage of the respective AUC after white bread containing the same amount of carbohydrate.SETTING: University teaching hospital clinical nutrition centre.SUBJECTS: Lean, normal subjects (4 male, 4 female) 21-33 y of age.RESULTS: Plasma insulin responses increased nearly linearly as carbohydrateintake increased from 0 to 100 g, but glycaemic responses increased by only 68%and 38% as carbohydrate intake increased from 25 to 50 g and 50 to 100g,respectively. The GI and II values of glucose, 149+/-16 and 147+/-18,respectively, were significantly greater than those of bread (100; P<0.05), whilethe values for fructose, 16+/-4 and 22+/-3 were significantly less than those of bread (P<0.001). GI values did not differ significantly from II values.CONCLUSIONS: It is conclu Continue reading >>

Sugar Explained

Sugar Explained

You've probably heard the terms fructose, glucose, lactose and sucrose before, and you may know that they're all types of sugar. But do you know how they differ from one another, or whether some are better for you than others? Use our handy guide to shed some light on the secrets of sugar... What are complex and simple carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are classified into two basic groups, complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates are composed of multiple simple sugars, joined together by chemical bonds. The more chains and branches of simple sugars, the more complex a carbohydrate is and in turn, the longer it takes to be broken down by the body and the less impact it has on blood sugar levels. Examples of complex carbohydrates include wholegrains such as jumbo oats, brown rice, spelt, rye and barley. Simple carbohydrates are either monosaccharides (one sugar molecule) or disaccharides (two sugar molecules). They are digested quickly and release sugars rapidly into the bloodstream. The two main monosaccharides are glucose and fructose. The two major disaccharides are sucrose (composed of glucose and fructose) and lactose (which is made up of galactose and glucose). Glucose What is glucose? Glucose is the primary source of energy your body uses and every cell relies on it to function. When we talk about blood sugar we are referring to glucose in the blood. When we eat carbohydrates, our body breaks them down into units of glucose. When blood glucose levels rise, cells in the pancreas release insulin, signalling cells to take up glucose from the blood. As the cells absorb sugar from the blood, levels start to drop. The nutritional profile of glucose The glycemic index is a ranking of how quickly foods make your blood sugar levels rise after eating them. High GI foods are very Continue reading >>

Difference Between Glucose And Sucrose

Difference Between Glucose And Sucrose

Key difference: Glucose is a monosaccharides sugar. Glucose is the primary source of energy for cells and a metabolic intermediate. Sucrose, the common table sugar is a type of disaccharides. As a disaccharide, it is made up of two molecules; one of glucose and one of fructose. Sugar is the generalized name for sweet-flavored food substances. Sugars are categorized as carbohydrates, which are a group of compounds made up of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Carbohydrates, and in turn sugars, are the source of chemical energy for living organisms, including humans. Sugars are categorized as monosaccharide, disaccharides and polysaccharides. Monosaccharides are the simplest carbohydrate type, composed of a single molecule. These include glucose, galactose, and fructose. Disaccharides are made up of two molecules. The table sugar, also known as sucrose, most commonly used by humans, is a type of disaccharide. Other disaccharides include maltose and lactose. Glucose, also known as D-glucose, dextrose, or grape sugar, is directly absorbed into the bloodstream during digestion. It is an important carbohydrate in biology, as cells use it as the primary source of energy and a metabolic intermediate. Glucose is one of the main products of photosynthesis and fuels for cellular respiration. Glucose is the basic molecule making starches. Many glucose molecules bonded together form starches, which are found in grains, legumes and starchy vegetables. Fruits usually contain small amounts of sucrose and varying proportions of fructose and glucose. Sucrose, on the other hand, is a disaccharide. It is also known as saccharose. Sucrose appears as a white, odorless, crystalline powder with a sweet taste. As a disaccharide, it is made up of two molecules; one of glucose and one of fructose via Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose?

What Is The Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose?

What Is the Difference Between Sucrose, Glucose & Fructose? Jamie Yacoub is a clinical outpatient Registered Dietitian, expert in nutrition and author of her cookbook "Modern Guide to Food and Eating: Low Glycemic Recipes". She obtained a Bachelor of Science in clinical nutrition from UC Davis and an MPH in nutrition from Loma Linda University. Yacoub then completed her dietetic internship as an intern for a Certified Specialist in sports nutrition and at a top-100 hospital. Small bowl of cubed sugar.Photo Credit: YelenaYemchuk/iStock/Getty Images Glucose and fructose are both monosaccharides -- simple sugar molecules. Sucrose is a disaccharide made up of two simple sugar molecules, a glucose molecule and a fructose molecule. Sucrose, glucose and fructose may taste similar in food sources such as fruit, honey and candy but are actually quite different. Sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup are major sources of fructose and glucose added to foods. Sucrose -- table sugar -- is equal parts fructose and glucose. HFCS is glucose and fructose mixed in different concentrations, the most common being 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose. HFCS is in soft drinks and pastries as well as many processed foods. Although too much of any sugar in your diet is not good, researchers of a review study published in 2013 in "Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism" suggest fructose is linked to metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical problems that increase your risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes when they occur together. HFCS is under scrutiny because manufacturers are not required to specify on food labels for general consumers how much fructose is in the concentration. Researchers of a study at the University of California Davis published in 2008 in "The American Journal o Continue reading >>

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