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Stress And Low Blood Sugar

Blood Sugar & Stress

Blood Sugar & Stress

When stressed, the body prepares itself. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine levels rise, and more glucose is available in the blood stream. What happens to my blood sugar levels when I’m stressed? During stressful situations, epinephrine (adrenaline), glucagon, growth hormone and cortisol play a role in blood sugar levels. Stressful situations include infections, serious illness or significant emotion stress. When stressed, the body prepares itself by ensuring that enough sugar or energy is readily available. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine (adrenaline) levels rise and more glucose is released from the liver. At the same time, growth hormone and cortisol levels rise, which causes body tissues (muscle and fat) to be less sensitive to insulin. As a result, more glucose is available in the blood stream. When you have type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars from too much medication or insulin are a common cause of stress. The hormonal response to a low blood sugar includes a rapid release of epinephrine and glucagon, followed by a slower release of cortisol and growth hormone. These hormonal responses to the low blood sugar may last for 6-8 hours – during that time the blood sugar may be difficult to control. The phenomena of a low blood sugar followed by a high blood sugar is called a “rebound” or “Somogyi” reaction. When you have type 2 diabetes, stress may make your blood sugar go up and become more difficult to control – and you may need to take higher doses of your diabetes medications or insulin. During times of stress, individuals with diabetes, may have more difficulty controlling their blood sugars. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned ab Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Does Stress Affect Your Blood Sugar Levels?

Diabetes: Does Stress Affect Your Blood Sugar Levels?

As a diabetic, you’ve likely asked yourself whether stress affects your blood sugar levels. The answer to that question is YES. Unfortunately in our fast paced society, it can be nearly impossible to avoid stress entirely. But there are several things you can do to better manage your stress levels and your blood glucose. What is Stress? If you are living with diabetes, you need to have a better understanding of stress. The term “stress” tends to get used a lot in this day and age. But it’s good to understand what it actually means medically. Stress produces strain in psychological response to an event or perceived attack. It can be prompted by a physical reason. These include sickness, surgery, a car accident etc. Stress can also come from a person’s emotional reaction to problems with money, health, friends, family, etc. We mostly associate stress as being caused by bad things, but good things can also be stressful. Diabetics have a lot to worry about when on vacations or visiting from family and friends. You may not even realize the stress you’re under when ziplining in Hawaii or cooking a large meal for loved ones. With diabetes, stress can be short term or long term. Short term stressors can range from realizing you forgot your diabetes medication to getting stuck in traffic. Long term stressors are things like the threat of diabetic complications as you age or taking care of an ailing loved one. How Does Stress Affect Your Blood Sugar Levels? When you are under stress, your body triggers its fight-or-flight response. Certain hormones including adrenaline, cortisol and epinephrine kick in. They make glucose and fat available to help your body escape the perceived danger. Unfortunately, your fight-or-flight response doesn’t work as well when you have di Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

The Link Between Hypoglycemia And Depression

The Link Between Hypoglycemia And Depression

Helen came to The Center • A Place of HOPE suffering from anxiety and depression. Her moods swung from hopelessness and lethargy to being stressed out and anxious. If it wasn’t one, it was the other. Both were taking their toll, and she wanted an end to them. Helen was tired of never feeling settled. She had become terrified she was bipolar because of her roller-coaster moods. It was this fear that finally propelled her into counseling. In addition to her therapy, Helen set up an appointment to see our nutritionist. What was mysterious to her was obvious to him. Helen had hypoglycemia, which was a major source of her depression and anxiety. Over the course of her adult life, Helen developed a pattern based upon her eating habits and food choices. She preferred quick, calorie-rich foods, eaten sporadically, with large amounts of caffeine throughout the day. Because she worked for a newspaper, Helen’s duties were stressful and time sensitive. Many times she put off eating, subsisting instead on high-caffeine beverages and sweets, consumed on the run. The caffeine and sweets propelled her headlong into nervousness and anxiety as her blood sugar levels spiked. The resulting crash of insulin to counter this massive sugar dump in her system brought feelings of depression and physical depletion. At these low times, Helen doubted her abilities, fretted over her age, and raged over any mistake. When Helen hit rock bottom, she questioned whether she was really capably of doing her high-stress, high-profile job. Her body was playing right into her fears of unworthiness and inadequacy to handle her job. Hypoglycemia is more commonly known as low blood sugar or the “sugar blues.” The body’s main source of fuel is glucose, which is a form of sugar. Glucose is produced by Continue reading >>

Stress & Low Blood Sugar

Stress & Low Blood Sugar

Stress & Low Blood Sugar: Toy-breed dogs can be susceptible to stress, which can cause a condition of low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia. In small breed puppies from post-weaning to 4 months of age, the most common form of hypoglycemia is called Transient Juvenile Hypoglycemia: "Transient" because the symptoms can be reversed by eating; "Juvenile" because it is seen in young individuals. Glucose is the "simple" sugar that the body uses for "fuel" to run its various functions. Table sugar, or sucrose, is made up of two simple sugars, glucose and fructose, and can be broken down rapidly after eating. All sugars are carbohydrates. Grains are also carbohydrates but are considered "complex" carbohydrates because they have many more components and take longer to be broken down. The body uses glucose as its primary energy source. All the parts of the body except the brain can, if needed, use alternate energy sources--fatty acids, for example, which the body accesses by breaking down fat stores. The brain, however, is completely dependent upon glucose to function. If the glucose in the blood is lower than normal, the brain function is the first to show signs. In dogs, these signs may be seen as weakness, behavior changes, confusion, wobbly gait, or even seizures. In fact, in young dogs who have had what may appear to be an epileptic seizure, low blood sugar is generally ruled out before a diagnosis of epilepsy is made. How are small breeds different? Puppies of very small size and toy breeds of dogs have characteristics that make them more prone to the development of Transient Juvenile Hypoglycemia, which is brought on by fasting. Pups of any breed are more likely to develop hypoglycemia than adults, because their skeletal muscle mass and liver size are smaller and brain size Continue reading >>

How Stress Affects Blood Sugar

How Stress Affects Blood Sugar

Research studies have connected many different physical conditions to having too much stress. Things like chronic fatigue syndrome and obesity have been linked to increased stress levels. It turns out that stress has an impact on blood sugar levels, which has great implications for those suffering from diabetes. People under increased levels of stress are suffering from a heightened “fight or flight” response. This causes the adrenal glands to put out norepinephrine, epinephrine, and cortisol when exposed to the stressor. The stomach knots up, the respiratory rate is faster, and the heart rate is faster. The cortisol released by the adrenal cortex (the outer layer of the adrenal gland) causes elevated blood sugar levels in an attempt to provide cellular fuel if the body actually needs to go into fighting or fleeing. If you suffer from type 2 diabetes, it means that your body’s cells are insulin resistant. The rise in glucose that comes from stress and cortisol release isn’t managed well and the blood sugar has no place to go. It means that the blood sugar levels will be too high. Stress in your Life Most people have a lot of stress in their lives. Stress comes from having long hours on the job, traffic jams getting to and from work, relationships that aren’t perfect, and financial difficulties. This causes the stress hormones to rise for long periods of time, even when we are not actively fighting or fleeing from predators. Rather than acting on the stressor, we sit there with elevated cortisol levels that secondarily increase the blood sugar levels on a chronic basis. What you can do There are several things you can do that can decrease cortisol levels, decrease the perception of stress, and lower blood sugar levels. All it takes is learning a few stress mana Continue reading >>

How To Recognize And Treat Hypoglycemia-related Anxiety

How To Recognize And Treat Hypoglycemia-related Anxiety

Hypoglycemia and anxiety are conditions that are closely interrelated. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a condition usually accompanying diabetes whose symptoms make it easy to mistake for an anxiety disorder or attack. While hypoglycemia's symptoms are a result of the bodily anxiety it induces, it requires different treatment and preventative techniques than regular anxiety. Though anxiety and hypoglycemia are interrelated, an anxiety condition cannot cause hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia, however, is a significant cause of anxiety, and it is important to be able to distinguish anxiety from a hypoglycemic attack so that it can be treated in a timely manner. Are You Worrying Too Much? Hypoglycemia can cause anxiety as a symptom, and those that have it may be concerned about their hypoglycemia to the point where they develop anxiety. If you haven't yet, take our free 7 minute anxiety test to score your anxiety severity and see how to control it. Start the test here. Signs of Hypoglycemia-Related Anxiety (vs. Regular Anxiety) It's not uncommon to have health concerns that can be caused by or related to anxiety. In some cases, people believe that their anxiety symptoms must be a health problem. In others, a health problem can cause people to worry. Find out more by taking my free 7 minute anxiety test now. Extreme hypoglycemia, as well as mildly low blood sugar, can result in a variety of symptoms recognizable as anxiety. These include: Heart palpitations (rapid or irregular heartbeat) Shaking Sweating Paleness, cold/clammy skin Nausea Seeing flashes of light. Dilated pupils (a common fear-response symptom) Moodiness Negative attitude Exaggeration of relatively minor problems All these symptoms match up to what you would expect to see or experience during an anxiety attack. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing For People With Pcos And Chronic Stress

Blood Sugar Testing For People With Pcos And Chronic Stress

We take blood sugar pretty seriously ‘round these parts, for a host of reasons. Blood sugar instability (dysglycemia) wreaks havoc on our adrenal glands – those tiny endocrine powerhouses whose overproduction of the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol can greatly impact thyroid function. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can trigger a cascade of hard-to-manage symptoms, including mood imbalance, energy dips, head fog, and insatiable cravings. And while our adrenals are pumping stress hormones, the hypothalamus gets a little distracted from its job spurring thyroid hormone production vis a vis disruption to the hypothalamic, pituitary, thyroid (HPT) axis. Next thing you know, your thyroid has become sluggish. So, yes, we spend a lot of time coaching our thyroid and adrenal clients on how to maintain stable blood sugar and avoid hypoglycemic episodes. (Jill calls these hair-raising episodes “the pit.”) Although low blood sugar can cause short-term concerns for many of us, consistently high blood sugar poses serious, long-term risks. Anyone with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), or people who are in prolonged periods of extreme stress, are at risk for elevated blood sugar, and would be well-served to monitor trends in blood sugar to nip any potential increases in the bud. PCOS is a condition characterized by hormonal imbalance. One such hormone impacted in women with PCOS is insulin, produced by the pancreas to allow our cells to access the energy available from our food. In essence, insulin regulates the amount of sugar in our blood. Women with PCOS are at a particular risk for insulin resistance (meaning that the body’s cells no longer respond as effectively to insulin) and type 2 diabetes. Those conditions, in turn, lead to higher risks of other complicati Continue reading >>

Stress And Diabetes

Stress And Diabetes

Both positive and negative situations can be stressful. Major life stresses, such as illness or a death in the family, are stressful events. Positive and new events, such as marriage, a new baby or a new job can also cause a stress response. Minor life stresses are the normal pressures of daily life, such as work deadlines, heavy traffic, phone calls or doctor visits. Holidays and vacations can cause stress. Too much stress can lead to health problems. Stress increases blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. When stressed, the immune system cannot fight disease well. Reducing stress or coping with it in a positive way, is important. How do you respond to stress physically? Your body responds to stress by raising your heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and blood sugar levels. Sometimes the symptoms of stress and low blood sugar are similar. Your blood sugar rises to give your brain and muscles energy. This is called the "fight or flight" response. If energy is not used to fight or run away, it can leave you feeling tense or cause headaches. Stress makes controlling diabetes harder. In people with diabetes, their "fight or flight" response does not work like it should. Insulin may not be able to carry the sugar into the cells, so sugar remains in the blood. This causes a high blood sugar and ketone levels may rise. Some people have a drop in blood sugar due to an increased intake of alcohol or skipping meals. The result of stress may be unstable blood sugar and ketone levels. If stress happens often, blood sugar and ketone levels may fluctuate. Some people are less able to deal with stress when their blood sugar is out of control. Everyone responds to stress in a different way. This is called coping. A variety of methods are needed to cope with different situations Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar Levels By Reducing Stress

How To Lower Blood Sugar Levels By Reducing Stress

When stressed, the body prepares itself by ensuring that enough sugar or energy is readily available. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine (adrenaline) levels rise and more glucose is released from the liver. At the same time, growth hormone and cortisol levels rise, which causes body tissues (muscle and fat) to be less sensitive to insulin? As a result, more glucose is available in the blood stream. When you have type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars from too much medication or insulin are a common cause of stress. The hormonal response to a low blood sugar includes a rapid release of epinephrine and glucagon, followed by a slower release of cortisol and growth hormone. These hormonal responses to the low blood sugar may last for 6-8 hours – during that time the blood sugar may be difficult to control. The phenomena of a low blood sugar followed by a high blood sugar are called a “rebound” or “Somogyi” reaction. Learn more about adult ADHD and anxiety… Reduce stress with Diet and Exercise Eat Your Way to Calm Here’s how to do it: Skip the simple sugars and starches (chips, cakes and ice cream). The spike in blood sugar and insulin they cause, combined with your already high cortisol levels, can lead you to eat more as well as put you at risk of insulin insensitivity and diabetes. There’s nothing wrong with reaching for comfort food, but take the attributes of the “bad” comfort food – creamy, crunchy, sweet – and try to find healthier alternatives. Avoid coffee and other caffeinated food and drinks. They not only increase levels of certain stress hormones, but also mimic their effects in the body (increasing heart rate, for example). Load up on vegetables and fruits and other high-fiber foods. The nutrients they provide lend an extra dollop Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar & Stress

Blood Sugar & Stress

When stressed, the body prepares itself. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine levels rise, and more glucose is available in the blood stream. Stress affects everyone… During stressful situations, epinephrine (adrenaline), glucagon, growth hormone and cortisol play a role in blood sugar levels. Stressful situations include infections, serious illness or significant emotion stress. What happens to my blood sugar levels when I’m stressed? When stressed, the body prepares itself by ensuring that enough sugar or energy is readily available. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine (adrenaline) levels rise and more glucose is released from the liver. At the same time, growth hormone and cortisol levels rise, which causes body tissues (muscle and fat) to be less sensitive to insulin. As a result, more glucose is available in the blood stream. When you have type 1 diabetes… When you have type 1 diabetes, insulin reactions or low blood sugars are a common cause of stress. The hormonal response to a low blood sugar includes a rapid release of epinephrine (and glucagon for a year or so after diagnosis), followed by a slower release of cortisol and growth hormone. These hormonal responses to the low blood sugar may last for 6-8 hours – during that time the blood sugar may be difficult to control. The phenomena of a low blood sugar followed by a high blood sugar is called a “rebound” or “Somogyi” reaction. When you have type 1 diabetes, stress may make your blood sugar go up and become more difficult to control – and you may need to take higher doses of insulin. During times of stress, individuals with diabetes, may have more difficulty controlling their blood sugars. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in thi Continue reading >>

Is There A Blood Sugar Monster Lurking Within You?

Is There A Blood Sugar Monster Lurking Within You?

Ever know someone who will get into the lousiest mood because they became hungry? And, if they don’t get some food in soon, the brain shuts down and they can become just plain mean? Sometimes they don't know they are hungry until after they eat—when they apologize for their behavior. Are you even one of those people? Hunger and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) are primitive signals known to set off the stress response in a person. In people who are predisposed, anxiety and depression can be common segues to this stress response. Triggered by drops and fluctuations in blood sugar, anxiety, and depression can manifest in people who are very sensitive and can become chronic if food intake isn’t consistent. Humans are built like all the other animals—and animals get very unhappy when blood sugar is low. It is an evolutionary mechanism that is designed to make finding food a priority. This priority is important, for it helps to avoid starvation. But in us humans, low blood sugar can have a very negative effect on mood. While the primitive animal goes into food-finding mode, sometimes our more complex human brain doesn’t realize it is a food issue, and instead simply feels anxious, depressed, angry, or even all three. That primitive part of us starts to stress about other issues (work, relationships) and the real culprit—low blood sugar—is not addressed. In a panic, sometimes a person who is hungry and stressed out might even go for more sugary foods (like sodas, cookies and cakes) which will cause even greater blood sugar fluctuations and keep the cycle going. How To Balance Your Blood Sugar If you know you are one of the people who are affected by drops in blood sugar, it is important to eat regularly throughout the day. And, as much as possible, it is best to p Continue reading >>

Is Stress The Source Of Your Blood Sugar Swing?

Is Stress The Source Of Your Blood Sugar Swing?

A catty co-worker, an unpaid credit card bill, planning a wedding — if something causes you stress, it can also trigger an increase in your blood sugar level. Thinkstock If you have type 2 diabetes, you know that certain foods — particularly foods that are high in carbohydrates — can send your blood glucose (sugar) level through the roof. But did you know that there’s a long list of other factors — such as too little sleep, illness, even monthly menstrual cycles — that can sabotage your best efforts to control your blood sugar? High on that list, though you may not be aware of it, is stress. Whether it’s related to work, to relationships, or to some other aspect of your life, research, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), has continually shown that emotional stress can cause blood sugar to surge. And since strict blood sugar control is the key to the successful management of type 2 diabetes, it’s important to understand how stress affects you and to find healthy ways to cope when mental distress mounts. The Effect of Stress on Blood Sugar According to the ADA, stress triggers an increase in the body's fight-or-flight hormone levels, as if the body were under attack. In response, the body releases extra energy in the form of glucose and fat. People with diabetes are unable to properly process that glucose because of insulin resistance, and consequently glucose builds up in the blood. “For someone who doesn't have diabetes, stress causes a temporary rise in blood sugar, but their body can adjust,” says Amy Campbell, RD, LDN, a certified diabetes educator and a contributor to DiabetesSelfManagement.com. “For someone with diabetes, the blood sugar level stays high.” Everyone gets stressed out at times, but it’s important to underst Continue reading >>

How Stress Affects Blood Glucose Levels

How Stress Affects Blood Glucose Levels

Stress can increase your blood glucose levels. Stress can also cause you to turn to unhealthful behaviors such as overeating, eating unhealthful foods or smoking. Managing your stress and relaxing more will help you and your baby stay as healthy as possible. Identify sources of stress Being pregnant, preparing for a new baby and learning to manage gestational diabetes are stressful things on their own. But you also lead a life in the real world, with all it stresses and tensions. Stress has many sources. Name some of your main sources of stress and see if you can identify an action to reduce or eliminate complications of gestational diabetes for you and your baby. You might find that simply learning as much as you can about gestational diabetes will relieve much of your worry. How to reduce your stress level Find opportunities to rest: sit, lie down, put your feet up. Talk to friends, family and your partner about your concerns and stresses. Lower your expectations of yourself. The house can be messy, the laundry can fall behind and you can be less than perfect. You're helping your baby grow and be healthy, and that's your first priority. Get enough sleep. Ask for help in getting tasks done. Ask a friend to drive, a sister to help set up the nursery, your partner to grocery shop. If possible, hire out tasks like yard work and house cleaning during your pregnancy. Know and accept your limits. Let friends and family know that for now, you have to take special care of yourself and your baby. When you need rest. excuse yourself and go rest. When you feel overwhelmed, take on less. Be physically active every day. It's a great stress reliever. Add relaxation to each day. Listen to your favorite music at work. Take a bubble bath. Close your eyes and do nothing except breathe d Continue reading >>

Ray Peat, Phd On Low Blood Sugar & Stress Reaction

Ray Peat, Phd On Low Blood Sugar & Stress Reaction

The requested URL /files/fbshare.php was not found on this server. Also see: Low Blood Sugar Basics PUFA Promote Stress Response; Saturated Fats Suppress Stress Response The Randle Cycle Ray Peat, PhD Quotes on Coconut Oil Low Carb Diet – Death to Metabolism Blood Sugar – Resistance to Allergy and Shock Thumbs Up: Fructose Theurapeutic Honey – Cancer and Wound Healing Carbohydrates and Bone Health Sugar (Sucrose) Restrains the Stress Response HFCS – More to it than we thought Protection from Endotoxin Possible Indicators of High Cortisol and Adrenaline Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids Toxicity of Stored PUFA Belly Fat, Cortisol, and Stress Ray Peat, PhD Quotes on Therapeutic Effects of Niacinamide “The maladaptive sequence, starting from stress or hypothyroidism, would typically involve increased absorption of endotoxin, leading to interference with mitochondrial respiration, a shift to fat oxidation, inflammation, and the increase of a wide range of stress hormones. Each of these happens to interfere with the production of progesterone, leading to increased LH.” “When the tissues are saturated with those antithyroid fats [PUFA], metabolism slows, especially when any stress, such as cold or hunger, increases the concentration of free fatty acids in the blood stream.” “Decreased blood sugar is a basic signal for the release of adrenal hormones.” “When we don’t eat for many hours, our glycogen stores decrease, and adrenaline secretion is increased, liberating more glucose as long as glycogen is available, but also liberating fatty acids from the fatty tissues. When the diet has chronically contained more polyunsaturated fats than can be oxidized immediately or detoxified by the liver, the fat stores will contain a disproporti Continue reading >>

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