diabetestalk.net

Smart Goals For Type 1 Diabetes

How To Set Realistic Diabetes And Fitness Goals And Find Your Positive Motivation

How To Set Realistic Diabetes And Fitness Goals And Find Your Positive Motivation

How to set Realistic Diabetes and Fitness Goals and Find Your Positive Motivation Before you are able to make any meaningful changes to your health, fitness, and diabetes management, you need to have two things: Clear and realistic goals for what you want to achieve The (positive) motivation that will allow you to work towards your goals on a daily basis Once you are clear about your goals and your motivation, you can start making plans for how to reach them. If you dont know your goals, you will have no way to plan effectively or measure your progress and you will most likely lose your motivation pretty quickly. The key to achieving fitness goals, especially, is to know exactly what it is that you actually want, and why you want it. In this article, I will map out my approach to goal setting and motivation. I have also created a handy printout to help you write out your goals and motivation in a structured format. You can download it at the end of this article. How to set specific and realistic short- and long-term goals My favorite structure for goal setting is called the SMART method. Its a simple and easy to remember method that you can use for any kind of goal setting, not justfor diabetesand fitness goals. Specific Your goals should be clear and well defined (I want to lose weight is not a specific goal. I want to lose 5 pounds is) Measurable You should be able to track and measure your progress towards your goal (better diabetes management is not measurable. An A1c of X.X is) Attainable Your goals should be ambitious but realistic (having a dream to follow is great, but you also need down-to-earth goals that you know you can reach if you put in the work) Relevant Make sure that reaching your goals will actually make your life better. Spend some time thinking abo Continue reading >>

How To Get Smart About Goal Setting

How To Get Smart About Goal Setting

Which: Identify requirements and constraints. Why: List specific reasons, purpose or benefits of accomplishing the goal. EXAMPLE: A general goal would be, Get in shape. But a specific goal would say, Join a health club and work outthree days a week. Establish concrete criteria for measuring progress on each goal you set. When you measure your progress, you stay on track, reach your target dates and experience the exhilaration of achievement that motivates you to reach your goals. To determine if your goal is measurable, ask yourself questions such as: When you identify the goals that are most important to you, you begin to figure out ways to make them come true. You develop the attitudes, abilities, skills and financial capacity to reach them. You begin seeing previously overlooked opportunities to bring yourself closer to the achievement of your goals. You can attain most any goal you set when you plan your steps wisely and establish a time frame that allows you to carry out those steps. Goals that may have seemed far away and out of reach eventually move closer and become attainable, not because your goals shrink, but because you grow and expand to match them. When you list your goals you build your self-image. You see yourself as worthy of these goals, and develop the traits and personality that allow you to possess them. Most of the time people know what they should be doing. SMART goals make us accountable. The trick is being accountable to yourself (or being accountable to your support system of friends and family) to accomplish your short term SMART goal. Its also important to stick to them even when you may be going through a difficult period of time. When we set goals, we have to keep in mind the upsets and changes that come our way and still accept personal r Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Diabetes

Managing Type 2 Diabetes

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Abstract Description: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) annually updates Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payers, and other interested parties with evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. Methods: For the 2017 Standards of Care, the ADA Professional Practice Committee did MEDLINE searches from 1 January 2016 to November 2016 to add, clarify, or revise recommendations on the basis of new evidence. The committee rated the recommendations as A, B, or C, depending on the quality of evidence, or E for expert consensus or clinical experience. The Standards of Care were reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee of the ADA Board of Directors, which includes health care professionals, scientists, and laypersons. Feedback from the larger clinical community informed revisions. Recommendation: This synopsis focuses on recommendations from the 2017 Standards of Care about monitoring and pharmacologic approaches to glycemic management for type 1 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) first released its practice guidelines for health professionals in 1989. The Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes have since provided an extensive set of evidence-based recommendations that are updated annually for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. The 2017 Standards of Care cover all aspects of patient care (1); this guideline synopsis focuses on monitoring and pharmacologic approaches for patients with type 1 diabetes. Guideline Development and Evidence Grading Monitoring Glycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Glycemic Goals: Recommendations Pharmacologic Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes: Recommendations Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes And Why Does It Occur?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes And Why Does It Occur?

There are two main types of diabetes, known as "Type 1 Diabetes" and "Type 2 Diabetes". These two conditions are generally considered to be 2 different and separate conditions, so it is important to understand the differences between the two. Some old names for Type 1 Diabetes include: "Juvenile Diabetes", "Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus" and "IDDM". These old names should not be used, as they are no longer considered correct. Important Stuff to Know In our bodies, an organ known as the pancreas produces insulin, which is a very important hormone. Insulin is vital because it enables the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. We need insulin to survive. In Type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. This usually happens in younger people, but it can happen at any age. When this happens, the pancreas no longer produces insulin. So what happens if there is no insulin in your body? The main effect is high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia). Insulin normally moves blood sugar into body tissues where it is used for energy. When there is no insulin, sugar builds up in the blood. High blood sugar is dangerous, with many side effects. It also causes damage to the body. What are the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes? The symptoms of Type 1 diabetes are all based on the fact that there is high blood sugar. The symptoms include: Extreme thirst Frequent urination Lethargy, fatigue and drowsiness Blurred vision Sudden weight loss Increased appetite, hunger When the blood sugar is stabilised by treatment, these symptoms go away. How is Type 1 diabetes treated? Every person with Type 1 diabetes needs to inject themselves with insulin to survive. There are quite a number of different types of insulin, and a number of different insulin t Continue reading >>

Health Tools: Scoring A Goal

Health Tools: Scoring A Goal

A doctor's take on setting realistic diabetes health goals, plus tech tools that can help you By Anuj Bhargava, MD, MBA, CDE, FACP, FACE As a diabetes physician, I have discovered that my patients who set realistic health care goals for themselves, and then take action toward achieving them, have the most success in managing the condition. I have also seen, however, several patients set high-reaching goals for themselves, only to fall short of their expectations. For example, a patient may come into my office with a goal of losing 50 pounds. But with no timeline set and no action plan in place, such a goal is difficult to meet. One of the biggest differences between patients who succeed and those who struggle is in the way in which they set their diabetes goals. Whether my patients would like to lose weight or take control of their blood sugar levels, one of the most important steps I recommend they take is to first create a S.M.A.R.T. goal. This acronym stands for specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-bound, and it provides an easy-to-use roadmap. Specific: State your goal in a specific way and explain how and when you'll do it. To lose weight is not specific. "To lose 20 pounds by exercising every day over the next six months is an example of a S.M.A.R.T. goal. Measureable: Measurable goals contain numbers rather than vague terms such as "more" or "less." Attainable: The goal does need to be something that you can do yourself. It may not be easy, it may be a challenge, but it should be something that you can do. Realistic: Losing 20 pounds in one week or one month is not realistic (or necessarily safe). But losing 20 pounds over 6 months means losing about 3.5 pounds a month. Thats doable! Some people consider the "R" in S.M.A.R.T. to stand for releva Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Through The Life Span: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Type 1 Diabetes Through The Life Span: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Incidence and Prevalence of Type 1 Diabetes The exact number of individuals with type 1 diabetes around the world is not known, but in the U.S., there are estimated to be up to 3 million (1). Although it has long been called “juvenile diabetes” due to the more frequent and relatively straightforward diagnosis in children, the majority of individuals with type 1 diabetes are adults. Most children are referred and treated in tertiary centers, where clinical data are more readily captured. The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study estimated that, in 2009, 18,436 U.S. youth were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (12,945 non-Hispanic white, 3,098 Hispanic, 2,070 non-Hispanic black, 276 Asian-Pacific Islander, and 47 American Indian) (2). Worldwide, ∼78,000 youth are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes annually. Incidence varies tremendously among countries: East Asians and American Indians have the lowest incidence rates (0.1–8 per 100,000/year) as compared with the Finnish who have the highest rates (>64.2 per 100,000/year) (3). In the U.S., the number of youth with type 1 diabetes was estimated to be 166,984 (4). The precise incidence of new-onset type 1 diabetes in those over 20 years of age is unknown. This may be due to the prolonged phase of onset and the subtleties in distinguishing the different types of diabetes. In one European study of adults aged 30–70 years, ∼9% tested positive for GAD antibodies (GADA) within 5 years of a diabetes diagnosis, consistent with other studies (5). Adults with type 1 diabetes often receive care in primary care settings rather than with an endocrinologist. Unlike the consolidated care seen in pediatric diabetes management, the lack of consolidated care in adults makes incidence and prevalence rates difficult to characterize, an Continue reading >>

7 Long-term Goals Everyone With Type 2 Diabetes Should Make

7 Long-term Goals Everyone With Type 2 Diabetes Should Make

Some short-term type 2 diabetes goals are universal, such as eating a healthy diet and exercising more. But diabetes impacts many areas of your health and your lifestyle over the long term, too. It’s important to consider long-term goals as you move forward with your diabetes management plan. Long-term goals for people with diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, your immediate goal should be to get and/or keep your blood sugar levels under control through diet, exercise, and, if needed, medications. Once you’ve accomplished that, it’s time to think about long-term goals to help you stay as healthy as possible and prevent diabetes complications. 1. Manage your cholesterol Your body needs cholesterol to perform many functions, and your liver makes all it needs. People with diabetes tend to have higher “bad” cholesterol (LDL) and triglyceride levels and lower “good” cholesterol (HDL). Eating a diet high in saturated and trans fats can increase your body’s production of bad cholesterol. High blood sugar levels and increased intake of simple sugars can increase triglyceride levels, as can chronically high alcohol intake. Smoking can decrease HDL levels. If you’ve never had your cholesterol levels checked, ask your doctor to order a lipid profile. If you know your levels are high, talk to your doctor about taking a cholesterol-lowering statin. Set a long-term goal to lower your levels by eating a heart-healthy diet and exercising regularly. Once your numbers are stable, have them checked at least once a year. 2. Stop smoking Smoking is bad for everyone, but even more so for people with diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, smoking can increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. It also makes it more difficult to control Continue reading >>

Setting Achievable Goals For Type 2 Diabetes

Setting Achievable Goals For Type 2 Diabetes

Setting Achievable Goals for Type 2 Diabetes Your goals need to be specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely. Heres how to get started. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Making some lifestyle changes is probably on your "to-do" list to improve your type 2 diabetes and to keep your blood sugar within your target range. However, change whether big or small is often hard to make and even harder to sustain. One solution: Set goals for yourself and outline the steps you'll take to achieve them, says Amy Walters, PhD, director of Behavioral Health Services at St. Luke's Humphreys Diabetes Center in Boise, Idaho. The more realistic and specific your goals are, the better, adds Emily Jones, RD, CDE, of the University of Michigan Diabetic Education Program. For the best chance at success, make your goals SMART specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely. Start by thinking about what matters most to you. Your type 2 diabetes goals and priorities should match. For instance, you might want to lose weight to better control your diabetes but also to keep up with your children or grandchildren. The more invested you are in achieving your goals, the more likely youll get there, Walters says. It's also important to focus on the positive rather than the negative, Walters says. A good example: Instead of dwelling on the fact that you need to lose 50 pounds, consider the idea that even a small weight loss, just 5 to 10 pounds, can make a big difference. Follow these steps to set goals you can achieve: Be proactive. Consider any potential barriers to reaching your goals, says Alyssa Gallagher, RD, LD, CDE, a certified diabetes educator at St. Lukes Humphreys Diabetes Center in Boise, ID. Then find ways to work around them. If your goal is to exercise , but y Continue reading >>

What Is The Goal Of Insulin Therapy With Type 1 Diabetes?

What Is The Goal Of Insulin Therapy With Type 1 Diabetes?

Continue Learning about Insulin Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

Setting Realistic Goals

Setting Realistic Goals

The right combination of exercise, choosing the right foods, and cutting back on portions will help you lose those extra pounds. Though losing weight will be your overall goal, you will take many smaller steps to reach it. Set a few smaller goals at a time and don't try to do it all at once. It takes time to build new habits and break old ones. Slipping up once in a while will happen we are all human! Just be sure to get back on track the next day. Think of one or two things you are ready, willing, and able to change about the way you eat and exercise. Then set a goal for each. Consider three things: What is the behavior that you will change? Be specific. Dont try to change too much at once. Be realistic. Here are some examples of goals that include these three elements: Eating Goal: Four days each week (How Often) I will eat an apple instead of ice cream as my evening snack (Realistic and Specific). Physical activity Goal: Five days each week (How Often) I will take a 30 minute walk during my lunch hour since I dont really need the whole hour to eat (Realistic and Specific). Notice that the eating goal is not I will eat more fruit or I will eat healthier. The activity goal is not Ill walk more. Goals like that are not specific enough. Another helpful resource for getting started is our book, Diabetes Weight Loss, Week by Week . Continue reading >>

Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose Level

Risk For Unstable Blood Glucose Level

Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level: Risk for variation of blood glucose/sugar levels from the normal range. There are different kinds of sugars. “Glucose” is what our body utilizes most. Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies and use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. Serum glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to body cells via the bloodstream and is made available for cell absorption via the hormone insulin, produced by the body primarily in the pancreas. Insulin is secreted by the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas in response to elevated level of blood glucose. This pancreatic hormone facilitates the movement of glucose across the cell membranes to be used for metabolic activity. The alpha cells of the islets of Langerhans secrete glucagon when blood glucose levels are low. Download PDF To View PDF, Download Here DocToPDF Hyperglycemia or elevated blood glucose levels may occur in a variety of clinical situations. Diabetes mellitus is the most common disorder associated with elevated blood glucose levels. Certain drugs have hyperglycemia as a side effect. Hypoglycemia, otherwise, occurs most often as the result of excess insulin administration in the person with diabetes mellitus. It may also occur to a person who has excessive alcohol intake, prolonged fasting and starvation states, adrenal insufficiency, and eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa. Low blood glucose levels after meals may be linked to gastric bypass surgery or excess consumption of refined carbohydrates and is the result of increased insulin production. An important part of managing blood glucose levels, as well as the ov Continue reading >>

Setting Smart Goals For Your Diabetic Weight Loss Plan

Setting Smart Goals For Your Diabetic Weight Loss Plan

Happy January!!! I hope the holidays have found you well. While I’m sure you may have eaten foods and portions outside the normal routine, I hope you’ve not gotten yourself too far in the hole in terms of weight and blood sugar. Regardless of whether you’ve taken a few steps backward, managed to maintain, or been an overachiever and actually achieved weight loss during the holidays (kudos to you!), January is a great time to focus on getting back on track with your healthy eating meal plan, blood sugar levels and physical activity. The start of a new year is an excellent time to reflect upon the past year, examine where you have come, evaluate what is most important to you, and set some goals to help you arrive where you’d like to be a year from now. Setting SMART Weight Loss Goals When I say “goals,” I don’t mean things like, “I want to lose weight,” or “I’m going to really start eating better.” Those are good starts, but how will you know if you’ve achieved them? How much weight do you want to lose? When do you want to lose it by? How will you measure the healthfulness of your diet? See where I’m going? In order to truly be successful, your goals should be SMART. This is a nice acronym to remember when coming up with a plan for success. Let’s take a closer look at how this works. S – Specific / Significant / Stretch First things first. Your goals should be SPECIFIC. The more vague your weight loss goal, the easier it will be to justify straying from it in your mind and the more difficult it will be to know whether you’ve accomplished it. Make your plan as detailed as possible. For example, “I am going to lose 1 pound a week and aim to lose 12 by April.” Then you can plan HOW you are going to do that. Your goal should also be SIGNI Continue reading >>

Changing Your Future Goal Setting Tips

Changing Your Future Goal Setting Tips

Diabetes Ireland > Changing Your Future Goal Setting Tips Its never too late to look at your life and ask Is my life how I want it to be? The start of a year is a good time to reflect and ask For most us, there are things in life that we would like to change but realistically how much control do we have over WHAT we CAN change? For example maintaining a lean body weight, being physically active and eating well can help to prevent about 80% of all Type 2 Diabetes cases. A diagnosis of Pre-diabetes at your GPs is an early warning sign and many people turn the tide on diabetes by changing their lifestyle and avoiding Type 2. Health is Wealth. A healthy body needs good fuel and plenty of activity to function as best it can to overcome lifes challenges. When we live well, we feel well and have more energy, more confidence and are therefore more likely to achieve our goals. So throw off 2016 and lets enter into a more positive and healthier 2017 Take control and decide on changing or doing something that is very important to you Write down your ultimate goal as this makes it real and shows commitment. Share your goal with your friends and if you can convince them that this is important to you, you are more likely to achieve it. Use the written goal statement to help motivate you when you start to doubt yourself or lose confidence in your ability to achieve your goal Test your goal:Is your goal realistic? Can you visualise yourself achieving this?Goals that are far out of reach are easy to put off. Write down the small steps and milestones will get you to the point where you achieve yourlong-term dream. Weight-Loss is typically a goal where many fail as they set unrealistic goals in too short a time period undertakingextreme measures that are impossibleto sustain and even har Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

Managing diabetes is a daily challenge. There are so many variables to keep in mind -- food, exercise, stress, general health, etc. -- that keeping blood sugar levels in the desired range is a constant balancing act. We want to make managing diabetes easier. So, the DRI's Education Team hasdeveloped short brochures about the topics listed below -- offering useful tips on many of the day-to-day issues facing people living with diabetes. And, most of the materials are offered in English and Spanish. If you can benefit by learning about one or more of these subjects, just click on the title to expand. Do you know what foods have the greatest impact on your blood sugars? If you answered CARBOHYDRATE FOODS...youre right! Carbohydrates -- "carbs" -- are broken down into glucose. So if you eat too much of them, your blood sugar level may rise. For this reason, people with diabetes find it helpful to keep track of the carbs they eat in order to manage their blood sugars. Carb counting is easy. It just takes some practice at first. Caring for older people with diabetes requires special thought and consideration. The older individual is more likely to have other health problems and may be taking a variety of different medications. Many people are frightened to check their blood sugar -- or "blood glucose" -- levels because they do not want to see levels that are higher or lower than their target range. But, checking blood sugar at home, in school, and in the workplace is key to managing diabetes. It puts you in control of your diabetes. Remember, your blood sugar levels remain the same whether you know about them or not. Checking blood sugar levels is the most accurate way to see if your lifestyle changes and medications are helping you to better manage your diabetes. If levels Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar