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Smart Goals Examples For Diabetes

Should Patients Set Smart Or Meaning(ful) Goals?

Should Patients Set Smart Or Meaning(ful) Goals?

Goals that help a patient connect with their care plan are preferred, for example, goals that fit the following criteria. While presenter Kath McPherson from the Auckland Institute of Technologyargued that patient goals could be vague and also asked why goals had to be realistic: wasnt it better that the patient continued to hope and work towards something, William M. M. Levackthe concept of helping patients set fiduciary goals. That is, guide the patients goals based on the situation more initially and less as the patient gained autonomy. To illustrate this he used the example of Mr Roberts a blind diabetic amputee who had a goal of going home to live. If Mr. Roberts goal were the only thing taken into consideration, it would ignore the realistic factors that might not make this possible, for example, his wifes ability to care for him. As such, a better approach for goal setting for Mr. Roberts was to consider a number of factors including: The values and preferences of the patient Clinical judgment of the healthcare professional For Mr. Roberts, this approach would look like this: The takeaway from these sessions was the necessity to link the clinicians small functional goals with the patients big aspirational goals. Functional goals are necessary and will measure progress but aspirational goals are what drives patient self efficacy which is so important for recovery. We think a lot about goal setting and patient reported outcomes at Wellpepper. Patient reported outcomes are great tools to show progress and also validate clinical efficacy but they must be linked to patients goals for real impact. Were working on some interesting ways to do this through our technology and are excited to be able to share this with the rehabilitation medicine community. Continue reading >>

S.m.a.r.t. Weight Loss With Type 2 Diabetes

S.m.a.r.t. Weight Loss With Type 2 Diabetes

Make losing weight with diabetes easier by setting S.M.A.R.T. goals. S.M.A.R.T. stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. When your goals are S.M.A.R.T., it will be simpler to stay on track with your diet. To help manage your diabetes, you need to spread carbs out more evenly throughout the day. So, for example, a S.M.A.R.T. goal is “I will eat a breakfast containing 45 grams of carbohydrates every day for the next 2 weeks.” Here’s the S.M.A.R.T. breakdown: Specific: targeted to breakfast Measurable: 45 grams, every day Attainable: Breakfasts with about 45 grams of carbs are very doable. A few options: 1 cup cooked oatmeal (32 grams), 1/2 medium banana (13 grams), a hard-boiled egg, black coffee 2 scrambled eggs, 1 small whole wheat pita (15 grams), 1 orange (18 grams), 1 cup 1% milk (14 grams) 3 rye crispbreads (24 grams), 1/2 cup nonfat cottage cheese (5 grams), 1 cup of blackberries (15 grams) Relevant: Spreading carbs out is relevant because it helps you curb hunger, so you don’t overeat. To hit 45 grams, you have to plan to eat protein and fat in addition to carbs at a meal. A piece of toast with an egg, for instance, will keep you feeling full longer than two slices of toast with jam. When you’re more satisfied, you’re likely to eat less overall. Time-bound: This goal will be your focus for 2 weeks. At the end of that time, you can decide if you want to do it again or set a different goal. Setting S.M.A.R.T. goals helps keep big projects, like losing weight or managing blood sugar, from being overwhelming. Your steps for success are clearly spelled out so that you know when you’ve met the goal. The biggest payoff comes from turning short-term goals into long-lasting, healthy habits. Continue reading >>

Goals & Objectives | Department Of Medicine

Goals & Objectives | Department Of Medicine

At the end of the Primary Care Ambulatory Medicine Clerkship, the fourth-year medical student should have a well-developed foundation of skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to provide for patients in office settings. Goal: You will develop and refine the basic clinical skills required to provide effective and efficient primary care. History and physical examination: obtain a patient's history and physical exam in a logical, organized and thorough manner while adapting to the urgency of the medical situation and the time available. Diagnostic decision making: formulate a differential diagnosis based on the key findings from the history and physical examination. Therapeutic decision making: understand risks, benefits, and compliance issues in choosing a treatment. Procedures: be able to perform such procedures as throat cultures, PAP smears, gram stains, wet mounts, and EKGs. 2. Comprehensive Care of Primary Care Patients Goal: You will recognize the spectrum of problems that occur in primary care and will understand how to provide, continuous comprehensive care to patients and their families. assessment of undifferentiated presentation, separating those problems that are serious and require immediate evaluation and consultations from those that do not. exposure to extended care centers including community clinics. Goal: You will develop effective communication skills with patients, families and other health care providers. Identify hidden agendas; recognize psychosocial issues; demonstrate listening skills with probing and clarifying; work with multiproblem patients, angry patients, and somatisizing patients. Make concise, accurate, and well-organized clinical notes and oral presentations and write prescriptions. 4. Application of Health Promotion and Disease Preven Continue reading >>

Goal Setting With Diabetes

Goal Setting With Diabetes

Posted by ADW Diabetes | Apr 27, 2012 | Diabetes Management | 0 | Goal setting with diabetes reduces your risk of developing serious health problems. Create a plan of action to develop healthier lifestyle habits. Self-management of diabetes is easier and more successful when you set clear goals. Goal-setting is necessary to self-manage diabetes. Discuss your goals with a diabetes educator to build confidence about accomplishing them. Your diabetes care team provides information and suggestions but you must do the work. Set SMART goals to manage diabetes. SMART stands for specific, measurable, action-oriented, realistic and time-limited. Goals need to be defined, attainable and accomplished within a certain time period. SMART goal-setting helps you keep your resolutions. Pick one but no more than three goals to get started. Write your goals down. It should answer the questions what, when, where and how often. An example is stating you will workout on the treadmill at the company gym after work three times a week for at least 30 minutes. Determine potential barriers to accomplishing your goals and ways to overcome them. An example is defining what to do if the company gym is closed after working overtime. Establish an alternative such as walking around the neighborhood after dinner for at least 30 minutes or breaking down the 30 minutes to two 15 minute walks during the work day. Once you are cleared to exercise by your physician, set a goal to walk daily for 30 minutes even if it is in smaller increments. Start walking three days a week up to 30 minutes then work your way up to everyday in a few weeks. Gradual goals build your endurance and create healthy habits. Meal planning helps you avoid the wrong foods to maintain proper blood sugar levels. Eat lean meats, fruits, Continue reading >>

Set Goals, Timeline, Budget

Set Goals, Timeline, Budget

To receive email updates about Diabetes at Work (DAW) enter your email address: Effectiveworksite wellness programs are based onsound data, specific goals, a realistic timeline and a fair budget. Goals should take into account the employee and workplace data you collected and specify what you want to accomplish. Make sure your programs goals are SMART-Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time specific. Here are some examples of possible diabetes related goals to think about: Develop supportive policies that allow employees with diabetes to management their disease. For example, Employees will be able to test blood glucose values as needed. Blood testing supplies and equipment may be kept at workstations and adequate time and an appropriate environment that is clean and provides for disposal of medical waste will be provided. Provide supportive infrastructures that facilitate the ability for employees to engage in healthy behaviors associated with diabetes prevention and management. For example, Areas for blood testing, time for exercise breaks, healthy options in vending machines and cafeteria as well as at meetings and events will be provided. Provide education sessions and nutrition and activity resources and activities for all employees to adopt healthier lifestyles that reduce risk for chronic disease. For example, Diabetes screening and information will be offered each March as part of the American Diabetes Alert. Coordinate workplace wellness effortsthat areefficient and measurable. For example, Free materials from the CDC and NDEP will be used in the wellness program and collaboration with local health care providers will be used to provide presentations and resources for employees. Data on number of participants, participant satisfaction and impact o Continue reading >>

Making Changes To Better Manage Diabetes | Glucerna

Making Changes To Better Manage Diabetes | Glucerna

Managing diabetes isnt just about what you eat. Its about when you eat, how much you eat, and your food choices. Being mindful while you eat can help you control your diabetes. Improving the quality of your diet can have significant health benefits, but making these changes can be so overwhelming that you put up barriers. Whats the good news? There are many strategies you can adopt to bring these barriers down. Being active is one of the best things you can do when you have type 2 diabetes. The benefits include lowering your blood sugar level to your blood pressure, burning calories, boosting energy, and even improving your mood. Stress can affect everything from your blood glucose level to your blood pressure. Stress can make it harder to follow your diabetes management plan. Fortunately, there is a lot you can do to reduce your stress. The Glucerna Club connects you to reliable, credible information to help you make good food and lifestyle choices. In joining the Glucerna Club, you will receive coupons, tools, and recipes valued at up to $100. Continue reading >>

Setting Achievable Goals For Type 2 Diabetes

Setting Achievable Goals For Type 2 Diabetes

Setting Achievable Goals for Type 2 Diabetes Your goals need to be specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely. Heres how to get started. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Making some lifestyle changes is probably on your "to-do" list to improve your type 2 diabetes and to keep your blood sugar within your target range. However, change whether big or small is often hard to make and even harder to sustain. One solution: Set goals for yourself and outline the steps you'll take to achieve them, says Amy Walters, PhD, director of Behavioral Health Services at St. Luke's Humphreys Diabetes Center in Boise, Idaho. The more realistic and specific your goals are, the better, adds Emily Jones, RD, CDE, of the University of Michigan Diabetic Education Program. For the best chance at success, make your goals SMART specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely. Start by thinking about what matters most to you. Your type 2 diabetes goals and priorities should match. For instance, you might want to lose weight to better control your diabetes but also to keep up with your children or grandchildren. The more invested you are in achieving your goals, the more likely youll get there, Walters says. It's also important to focus on the positive rather than the negative, Walters says. A good example: Instead of dwelling on the fact that you need to lose 50 pounds, consider the idea that even a small weight loss, just 5 to 10 pounds, can make a big difference. Follow these steps to set goals you can achieve: Be proactive. Consider any potential barriers to reaching your goals, says Alyssa Gallagher, RD, LD, CDE, a certified diabetes educator at St. Lukes Humphreys Diabetes Center in Boise, ID. Then find ways to work around them. If your goal is to exercise , but y Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care And Goal Setting - There's An App For That!

Diabetes Care And Goal Setting - There's An App For That!

Diabetes Care and Goal Setting - There's an App for That! I am the educator in our weight management program tonight. I will talk about the benefits of exercise and how to get started. As part of this process, we will talk about setting goals. Creating behavior change goals and getting them down on paper is challenging for many people and can be difficult to facilitate as an educator. But, goal setting, and doing it well, is important. Earl Nightingale (1921-1989), a World War II veteran, author, and motivational speaker said, People with goals succeed because they know where theyre going. A common method used for goal setting for behaviors is the SMART goal system. The letters can mean different things, but commonly refer to: Specific, Measurable, Attainable or Action-oriented, Relevant or Realistic, and Time-bound. Look at the difference between I want to lose 25 pounds and I will follow a meal plan totaling up to 1500 calories per day for 6 weeks to lose weight. The first one is vague; the second follows the SMART goal system. I know exactly what I plan to do, how I plan to do it, for how long, and why. I have a SMART plan! As diabetes educators, we facilitate goal setting and give encouragement to achieve the goal. All you need is the plan, the road map, and the courage to press on to your destination, said Earl Nightingale. But, we cant be everywhere for everybody at all times. So, a resource has been created by AADE, the AADE Diabetes Goal Tracker mobile application for smartphones and tablets. Yes, there is an app for that! It is a free resource for you and people with diabetes that can help them set, track and achieve their goals related to managing diabetes. It is based on the AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors. The app includes information about diabetes, complication Continue reading >>

Smart-goals - St. Anthony's Medical Center

Smart-goals - St. Anthony's Medical Center

Welcome to 2016! How many of you have come up with resolutions to better your life for the future? Why not use your resolution this year to set goals to better your diabetes management and improve your overall health? SMART goals are used to help people take steps to achieve particular outcomes. People are more likely to work towards and achieve SMART goals simply by the way they are designed. Lets look at an example: This year I will be more physically active Striving to increase your physical activity is good.but lets take a look at making this goal a SMART goal. A SMART goal is Specific: Choose one thing you want to change, and include details Measureable: How much? How will you measure your progress? Achievable: Can you actually accomplish this goal? Is it within reason? Will you be able to do it? Realistic: Goals should be do-able. If goals are set too high, you are less likely to achieve what you have set out to do. Ask yourself if the goal is practical and is it important to you. Now, let's take a look again at our goal, except now we will make it a SMART goal: "This year I will start being active by walking 20-30 minutes during my lunch hour on Monday, Wednesday and Friday for the next two weeks starting on Monday." Don't forget to think about any concerns or possible roadblocks, and how you would handle it. If you find a goal you set just isn't working out for you, you may need to adjust it. For example, if you set a goal of trying three new recipes a week for one month, but you find you are too busy to try all that new cooking and it is stressing you out, change the goal to one new recipe each week. Managing diabetes is not always easy. Setting SMART goals can help make managing diabetes a little easier. Continue reading >>

Set An Exercise Goal & Make A Plan

Set An Exercise Goal & Make A Plan

If youre ready to start getting active, its time to set goals and make a plan. Remember to start small if you havent been active in a while; you dont want to overwhelm or hurt yourself. When you think of a physical activity goal, make sure you consider three points: What activity will you do and for how long? Be specific. Is your goal realistic? Dont try to change too much at once! Here is an example of a goal that includes the three points above: Four days each week I will take a 10-minute brisk walk during the lunch hour (since I dont really need the whole hour to eat). Notice that the activity goal is not Ill walk more or Ill be healthier. Those goals are not specific enough. Writing goals down can help. Put them in a place where you will see them oftenon the refrigerator, your bathroom mirror, or in your purse or wallet. In addition to setting goals, plan ahead to set yourself up for success. Make sure you answer the questions below so you have a full plan and back-up plan when it comes to your new routine. Example: I am mostly sedentary. The most exercise I get is housework or yard work once a week. ________________________________________________ Example: Four days each week I will take a 15-minute brisk walk during the lunch hour since I dont really need the whole hour to eat. ________________________________________________ Example: I need to bring my walking shoes and socks to work so Ill have something comfortable to walk in. ________________________________________________ This might come up, and get in the way of my plan: Example: I might have a meeting during my lunch hour. ________________________________________________ Example: Ill take a walk after dinner with my spouse or a friend. ________________________________________________ Heres when Ill start Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Weight Loss - Setting Smart Goals For Exercise And Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes And Weight Loss - Setting Smart Goals For Exercise And Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes and Weight Loss - Setting SMART Goals for Exercise and Weight Loss By Beverleigh H Piepers | Submitted On September 14, 2017 Goals: they can work for you or against you. For better or worse they exist and no doubt you plan to make good use of them. Goals can be harmful when too much emphasis is placed on the "promised" results. You must dedicate yourself to the process because it is only when you actively commit to the process the results will come. You can view this as pushing through a short-term struggle for a long-term gain. Another way goals can work against you is if they are not adequately structured: this is where the idea of S.M.A.R.T goals come in. If you set your goals according to S.M.A.R.T, you will be more likely to succeed. Let us look at two areas where setting S.M.A.R.T goals can be of great assistance: exercise and weight loss... S - Specific. Starting with S, your goals must be specific. Wanting to lose weight and get in shape are not specific targets. They are broad goals and it would benefit you to be more particular about your intentions. Losing twenty pounds and increasing your fitness so you can swim 500 meters are good examples of specific goals. As you can imagine, in the case of exercise and weight loss these goals work together. Losing twenty pounds will improve your fitness, and working on your fitness will help you lose weight. M - Measurable. Your goals must be measurable. Fortunately, it is easy to track changes in your weight. You will have to be honest with yourself in regards to how well your fitness is coming along, but that is as tough as it gets. A - Attainable. It may seem ambitious or feel uplifting to set challenging goals, such as getting a six-pack or getting in shape to run a 10km race. But in all likelihood, Continue reading >>

Changing Your Future Goal Setting Tips

Changing Your Future Goal Setting Tips

Diabetes Ireland > Changing Your Future Goal Setting Tips Its never too late to look at your life and ask Is my life how I want it to be? The start of a year is a good time to reflect and ask For most us, there are things in life that we would like to change but realistically how much control do we have over WHAT we CAN change? For example maintaining a lean body weight, being physically active and eating well can help to prevent about 80% of all Type 2 Diabetes cases. A diagnosis of Pre-diabetes at your GPs is an early warning sign and many people turn the tide on diabetes by changing their lifestyle and avoiding Type 2. Health is Wealth. A healthy body needs good fuel and plenty of activity to function as best it can to overcome lifes challenges. When we live well, we feel well and have more energy, more confidence and are therefore more likely to achieve our goals. So throw off 2016 and lets enter into a more positive and healthier 2017 Take control and decide on changing or doing something that is very important to you Write down your ultimate goal as this makes it real and shows commitment. Share your goal with your friends and if you can convince them that this is important to you, you are more likely to achieve it. Use the written goal statement to help motivate you when you start to doubt yourself or lose confidence in your ability to achieve your goal Test your goal:Is your goal realistic? Can you visualise yourself achieving this?Goals that are far out of reach are easy to put off. Write down the small steps and milestones will get you to the point where you achieve yourlong-term dream. Weight-Loss is typically a goal where many fail as they set unrealistic goals in too short a time period undertakingextreme measures that are impossibleto sustain and even har Continue reading >>

Time To Get Smart, Set Goals Addressing Diabetes

Time To Get Smart, Set Goals Addressing Diabetes

in: Health , In the Issue , Life , News | April 7, 2016 - 11:18 pm |by: admin | No Comment Time to get SMART, set goals addressing diabetes Diabetes takes a disproportional interest in the minority community and one Baton Rouge area mental health professional thinks its time for the community to return that interest with deliberate game plans aimed at limiting the devastation caused by this chronic-disease killer. Charles Martin, Capital City Health Center director of behavior health, has both professional and personal viewpoints regarding the challenges of diabetes. His parents and grandparents were insulin-dependent and he is recovering from a diabetes-related limb amputation. Even when the challenges seem great, Martin invokes the daily prescription of NFL coach Chip Kelly: Win the day. Instead of simply resolving to turn the tide on diabetes, Martin encourages another tactic: Goal setting. We people living with diabetes may have the fear that we will be gun-ho in January with everyone else making New Years resolutions, Martin said. But then, are we going to burn ourselves out? We start fast and we fizz quickly, but it goes back to Chip Kelly and that motto Win the day. We are just going to take it one day at a time. It goes back to this attitude that this is something that we have to do daily. When we think about renewing the mind, we should be reminded that our prayers ask give us this day, our DAILY bread. Martin encourages the attitude of daily as a tool in diabetes management. We must remember that we are consistently inconsistent, he said. The goal is to be consistently consistent. To do that, we must take it one day at a time and try to max out that day. This deadly opponent packs a daunting record against Blacks who are greatly disproportionately affected by Continue reading >>

Smart Diabetes Goals 6

Smart Diabetes Goals 6

Setting the right diabetic goals and targets is important. The right diabetes goals can mean a long life full of LIVING! The wrong goals can mean deteriorating health, more and more drugs and more and more pain. Diabetes without goals and a plan to achieve the goals is fraught with danger. Dont misunderstand me, Id love to set sail and see where the winds and the tides will take me. However, that wont work when it comes to diabetes care. For diabetics it ends in amputations, nerve pains, organ loss and much suffering. Proper diabetes goals are critical to your success. A lack of goals or improper goals, are why millions of diabetics suffer every damn day. Sadly, the medical industry promotes blood sugar targets that are too high and harmful. Their targets, coupled with a high carb, low fat, grain based meal plan is a recipe for disaster. Diabetes goal setting is serious business, you want them to be Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time Constrained (SMART). Diabetes goal setting is serious business, you want them to be smart and S.M.A.R.T. goals. Specific what are your blood sugar goals? My Diabetes Goals are 60-90 mg/dl heres a post I wrote explaining why I set these goals . Measurable thats easy if you are a diabetic, take your blood sugar reading! Attainable without question my diabetes goals are attainable by every diabetic. I know Type 1s, Type 2s who attain them obese, skinny and everyone in between. Relevant are diabetes goals relevant? Of course they are! Obtaining and maintaining truly normal blood sugars are the KEY to a long life without diabetes complications. Time Constrained this is to add a sense of urgency and to prevent the goal from being an open-ended proposition. I want to maintain truly normal blood sugars 24 hours a day, 365 days a y Continue reading >>

Health Tools: Scoring A Goal

Health Tools: Scoring A Goal

A doctor's take on setting realistic diabetes health goals, plus tech tools that can help you By Anuj Bhargava, MD, MBA, CDE, FACP, FACE As a diabetes physician, I have discovered that my patients who set realistic health care goals for themselves, and then take action toward achieving them, have the most success in managing the condition. I have also seen, however, several patients set high-reaching goals for themselves, only to fall short of their expectations. For example, a patient may come into my office with a goal of losing 50 pounds. But with no timeline set and no action plan in place, such a goal is difficult to meet. One of the biggest differences between patients who succeed and those who struggle is in the way in which they set their diabetes goals. Whether my patients would like to lose weight or take control of their blood sugar levels, one of the most important steps I recommend they take is to first create a S.M.A.R.T. goal. This acronym stands for specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-bound, and it provides an easy-to-use roadmap. Specific: State your goal in a specific way and explain how and when you'll do it. To lose weight is not specific. "To lose 20 pounds by exercising every day over the next six months is an example of a S.M.A.R.T. goal. Measureable: Measurable goals contain numbers rather than vague terms such as "more" or "less." Attainable: The goal does need to be something that you can do yourself. It may not be easy, it may be a challenge, but it should be something that you can do. Realistic: Losing 20 pounds in one week or one month is not realistic (or necessarily safe). But losing 20 pounds over 6 months means losing about 3.5 pounds a month. Thats doable! Some people consider the "R" in S.M.A.R.T. to stand for releva Continue reading >>

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