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Signs Of High Or Low Blood Sugar

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like

In this article, we will explore what low blood sugar feels like for different people with diabetes. We will look at the symptoms, how they can change over time, and how they are often different from person to person. We will look at planning ahead, and the treatment of hypoglycemia, hereafter referred to as “low blood sugar.” To get started, patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes were interviewed and asked the question: What is it like and what do you do when life hands you the low blood sugar agenda for the day? Describe your experience. Melissa’s story Melissa is usually gung-ho and ready to go for the day, but when she is handed the low blood sugar agenda, it takes all the wind out of her “cells.” They feel wrinkled up and emaciate. Here is how Melissa describes her low blood sugars: I imagine you, (you wrinkly old emaciated cell with no food in you), as a grumpy old man. I scream at you, though I can’t move. No, I won’t take your stifling agenda! I have to work after all. My kids need me to take them to dance class after school. I’m reluctant to take your agenda, packed with the helplessness that is my poison pill of the day. If I believe those positive self-help type blogs, then I would know that to decide you are happy determines your destination for the day. If you have diabetes, that’s a crock. With diabetes, your low blood sugar determines your agenda, and ultimately what you will be able to do for the day. When it gets below 70, or dips severely low- it begs and screams to be addressed! Especially if it dips fast, then I’m in trouble. Every cell in my body screams out. If it’s too low, I can’t move to do anything about it! Often I get a little dizzy feeling, and then I know I have to treat. I will get the shakes so bad that I can’t Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar That Might Indicate I Have Diabetes?

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar That Might Indicate I Have Diabetes?

Question: What are the symptoms of high blood sugar that might indicate I have diabetes? Answer: First of all there may not be any symptoms of high blood sugar, so it is worth screening if you have a strong family history, if you have a reason to think that you may have diabetes, because sometimes it's asymptomatic and it's important to know if your blood sugar is high and if you do have diabetes and get it under control early. But if the blood sugar goes very high then lets say over 200 or so, then it can cause symptoms and the classic symptoms would be increased thirst, increased urination, general fatigue, vaginal infections in women, and even blurred vision can occur from the high blood sugar. These symptoms, as I say, may not occur, or they may occur in any combination, but what's causing them is that the sugar is thickening the blood, so it's really like taking maple syrup and pouring maple syrup into a glass of water. If you do that after a while, the water gets thicker and thicker, and in the bloodstream, the brain then reads that as the blood's too thick, I need to drink in order to dilute back out the blood, and when I drink and I drink, sometime people with diabetes drink gallons of water in a day, when drink and I drink, I have to put it somewhere, and where I put it is to urinate it out. That's not really solving the problem, it's not really curing the diabetes in any way or treating it, but thirst and urination is the classic symptom of diabetes and indicates that you do need help. Next: What Is Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) And What Are Its Symptoms? Previous: What Causes High Blood Sugar And What Harm Can It Do To My Body? Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? While each child may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia differently, the most common include: shakiness dizziness sweating hunger headache irritability pale skin color sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason clumsy or jerky movements difficulty paying attention or confusion What causes hypoglycemia? The vast majority of episodes of hypoglycemia in children and adolescents occur when a child with diabetes takes too much insulin, eats too little, or exercises strenuously or for a prolonged period of time. For young children who do not have diabetes, hypoglycemia may be caused by: Single episodes: Stomach flu, or another illness that may cause them to not eat enough fasting for a prolonged period of time prolonged strenuous exercise and lack of food Recurrent episodes: accelerated starvation, also known as “ketotic hypoglycemia,” a tendency for children without diabetes, or any other known cause of hypoglycemia, to experience repeated hypoglycemic episodes. medications your child may be taking a congenital (present at birth) error in metabolism or unusual disorder such as hypopituitarism or hyperinsulinism. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels [en Español]

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels [en Español]

Topic Overview When you have diabetes , you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels ( hypoglycemia ) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range . If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes . Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others when they need help. There are ma Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Low Blood Sugar

How Can I Get Low Blood Sugar? You can get a low blood sugar (blood glucose) if you... Delay a meal Skip a meal or snack Eat too little Take too much insulin Exercise more than usual Drink alcohol without eating (drinking is not advised during pregnancy How will I Feel if My Blood Sugar is Low? Symptoms of low blood glucose are... Headache Dizziness Drowsiness Cold sweat Difficulty concentrating Pounding heart Difficulty talking Tingling of mouth Irritability Extreme hunger What Should I Do if My Blood Glucose Might Be Low? Sit down - Get help if available. Test your blood sugar - If your blood glucose is less than 70, eat or drink 15gms of carbohydrate (see below) or take 3 glucose tabs. Retest your blood sugar in 15 minutes - If your blood glucose has not increased at least 20 points, consume another 15 grams of carbohydrate. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until blood sugar is 70 or more (x2). Continue to monitor how you feel and retest your blood sugar as indicated. The Following Foods Have About 15 Grams of Fast-Acting Carbohydrates: 3-4 glucose tablets (with water) 1 tube glucose gel 1/2 cup fruit juice 1/3 cup regular JELL-O® (not diet) 1 tablespoon honey or sugar 1 tablespoon jam or jelly (not diet) 1/2 cup regular soda (not diet) 6 Life Savers® 4 Starbursts® 1 cup fat-free milk Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

Blood sugar concentrations or blood glucose levels are the amount of sugar or glucose present in your blood stream. Your body naturally regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels as a part your body”s metabolic processes. Glucose or sugar is the primary energy mechanism for cells and blood lipids. Glucose or blood sugar is transported from your intestines or liver to the cells in your body via the bloodstream. The absorption of glucose is promoted by insulin or the hormone produced in the pancreas. If your sugar levels are not balanced you may have high or low blood sugar issues. Low sugar issues are hypoglycemia and high blood sugar indicates that you have hyperglycemia or hyperglycemia symptoms. High or low blood sugar levels cause different problems. Low blood sugar levels can cause dementia, comas or death. High blood sugar is a major cause of damage to your body”s internal organs. Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar or hypoglycemia indicates the level of glucose in your blood has dramatically dropped below what your body need to function. When your blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter symptom will develop. You may feel tired and anxious or weak and shaky. Your heart rate may be rapid and you feel as if you are having a heart attack. Eating something sugary will bring your sugar levels back to normal almost immediately and symptoms will subside. Sugar levels that are below 40 mg/dL cause you to have behavior changes. You may feel very irritable and become weak and confused. You may not realize you need to eat to raise your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels below 20 mg/dL will most certainly cause a loss of consciousness or perhaps you will experience seizures. You will need medical care immediately. Hypoglycemia symptoms happen very quickly. If you a Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, happens when there is too much sugar in your blood. High blood sugar may affect people whether their diabetes is well controlled or not. In people whose diabetes is not well controlled, episodes of high blood sugar may happen because they are not treating their diabetes. Or they may not even know that they have diabetes. If left untreated, high blood sugar can cause serious health problems. High blood sugar can happen if you: Skip a dose of diabetes medicine Eat more than usual Are less active than usual Are under stress or are sick If your blood sugar is too high, you may: Feel very thirsty or hungry Need to pass urine more than usual Feel like your mouth and skin are dry Have blurry vision Feel sleepy Notice that sores and wounds are healing slower than usual Have unexplained weight loss High blood sugar and DKA High blood sugar can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. DKA is mainly a problem for people with type 1 diabetes. But it may also happen to people with type 2 diabetes. DKA occurs when there is a buildup of ketones (acids) in the blood. Ketones are made when your body uses fat for energy instead of sugar. This can happen when you don’t have enough insulin and sugar is not getting into your cells to be used for energy. Ask your diabetes care team how and when you should check for ketones. Regular checks of your urine or blood for ketones can help prevent this serious problem. Ketones in your urine or blood are a sign that your blood sugar is too high and you do not have enough insulin to help the sugar enter the cells of your body. What to do about high blood sugar If you have signs or symptoms of high blood sugar (higher than 140 mg/dL before a meal or higher than 180 mg/dL over 2 hours after a meal), check your blood s Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar

Topic Overview Symptoms of mild low blood sugar You may have these symptoms when your blood sugar has dropped below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). When you have had diabetes for many years, you may not always develop symptoms of mild low blood sugar. Some young children with diabetes cannot recognize symptoms of low blood sugar. Others can, but not every time. To be safe, the parents need to do a home blood sugar test whenever they suspect low blood sugar in a child. Symptoms may include: Sweating (almost always present). Check for sweating on the back of your neck at your hairline. Nervousness, shakiness, and weakness. Extreme hunger and slight nausea. Dizziness and headache. Blurred vision. A fast heartbeat and feeling anxious. These symptoms may go away shortly after you eat food that contains sugar. Symptoms of moderate low blood sugar If your blood sugar continues to drop (below 40 mg/dL), your behavior may change. Symptoms may include: Inability to concentrate. Confusion and irritability. Slurred speech. Unsteadiness when standing or walking. Muscle twitching. Personality changes, such as anger or crying. Symptoms of severe low blood sugar Symptoms of severe low blood sugar (usually below 20 mg/dL) include: Seizure. Loss of consciousness (coma). Stroke. Death. Signs of low blood sugar at night If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night (nocturnal hypoglycemia) include: Restlessness. Making unusual noises. Attempting to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. Sleepwalking. Nightmares. Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. Signs of hypoglycemic unawar Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During th Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

9 Signs Of High Blood Sugar You Should Never Ignore, Even If You Aren’t Diabetic

9 Signs Of High Blood Sugar You Should Never Ignore, Even If You Aren’t Diabetic

Everyone likes something a little sweet now and again, but depending on our bodies, we may have to be a little more careful when it comes to indulging than others. This caution is not just about things like weight gain or even the inflammation of the gut and candida overgrowth that eating too much sugar can cause. In fact, it’s much simpler, but can be much more dangerous to your health: it’s your blood sugar levels. Now, your body and blood need a certain amount of sugar for energy, but too much can cause serious health complications like diabetes, hyperglycemia. Too high blood sugar can also cause a host of very unpleasant symptoms, with a diabetic coma being the most severe. (This can also happen when your blood sugar is too low, but that’s another issue!) Luckily, there are lots of warning signs before a coma happens, so don’t freak out. Just be sure that you’re paying attention to what your body is telling you, and if you have existing issues with blood sugar, make sure your doctor knows all about any symptoms or changes you may have experienced. Learn the signs you that could be warning you that your blood sugar is getting too high. Obviously, if you take your blood sugar levels, then you’ll know what’s too high, but if you’ve never done it, there are also physical symptoms that you should be aware of. With some vigilance, as well as some changes to your diet and lifestyle, you can bring your levels back to normal. Just be sure to consult with a doctor before making any changes. Why Is High Blood Sugar Dangerous? If your blood sugar levels are too high, it can really wreak havoc on your body. Frequent or ongoing high blood sugar can cause nerve damage, as well as damage to the blood vessels and organs. For people with Type 1 diabetes, it can also l Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

The Facts Hypoglycemia occurs when the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood is too low. Normally, your body keeps your blood glucose within a concentration range of 4.0 mmol/L to 8.0 mmol/L (about 70 mg/dL to 140 mg/dL). In order to do this, the body has mechanisms that involve the hormone insulin, which is made by the pancreas, as well as several other hormones. When blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas responds by releasing insulin to encourage the movement of glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. Insulin lowers the amount of glucose in your blood by signalling the cells in the body to use the glucose as fuel. Your body uses glucose as its main fuel. The brain requires a constant supply of blood glucose and will signal the adrenal glands to release two hormones called adrenaline and cortisol whenever blood glucose levels are low. The adrenaline and cortisol then signal the liver to convert the carbohydrates it stores (from the foods we eat) into glucose and release it into the bloodstream. The pancreas is also involved in raising blood glucose levels if they fall too low. When blood sugar is low, the pancreas releases the hormone glucagon, which increases blood sugar by signalling the liver to convert stored carbohydrates into glucose and to create new glucose molecules from other substances (such as amino acids) in the liver. If these mechanisms don't work properly, the blood glucose remains too low and the brain won't be able to function normally. Causes Hypoglycemia can be caused by medications. Medication-related hypoglycemia occurs most commonly in people who have diabetes, especially type 1 diabetes (a type of diabetes where the pancreas does not make insulin). In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes it can occur when someone is given too much insulin or other Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes in an autoimmune disease where a person’s pancreas doesn’t produce insulin—a hormone needed to convert food into energy. It affects children and adults, comes on suddenly, and it cannot be prevented or cured. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a common and dangerous occurance with type 1 diabetes. If your blood sugar gets too low it may lead to insulin shock, which is life-threatening if not cared for. Low blood sugar can happen when your body has too little food—or glucose—or when it produces too much insulin. Type 1 diabetes hypoglycemia symptoms So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of low blood sugar will vary depending on the person. However, people with type 1 diabetes—whether it’s been diagnosed or not—may experience one or more of the following: -Sweating and shaking -Blurry vision -Poor coordination -Dizziness or feeling lightheaded -Difficulty concentrating -Feeling anxious or irritable -Hunger or nausea -Erratic changes in behavior What to do if you experience low blood glucose symptoms Severely low blood-sugar levels can lead to hypoglycemic seizures, unconsciousness, coma, and death if left untreated. That’s why it’s important to see a doctor if you think you have low blood sugar so he or she can check your blood-glucose levels—look into whether type 1 diabetes may be a cause—and provide the necessary treatment. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of High And Low Blood Sugar As A Diabetic, It Is Important To Know The Early Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar. See These Symptoms Below.

Signs And Symptoms Of High And Low Blood Sugar As A Diabetic, It Is Important To Know The Early Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar. See These Symptoms Below.

As you can tell, these symptoms can be the same but how you treat these conditions is different. That is why it is important to test your blood sugar before acting. If you test your sugar and learn it is high, try walking and moving about the house for 30 minutes. If your blood sugar is low, try eating a carb source like a piece of fruit or cracker. To avoid your blood sugar from dropping too soon after your snack, make sure to pair your carb with a protein like a piece of cheese or some nuts. If you find your blood sugar is very low you may need to use a quick carb source like juice, glucose tabs or a piece of hard candy. HYPERGLYCEMIA (High blood sugar) Causes: Too much food, too little insulin, illness or stress Blood Sugar: Above 200 mg/dL HYPOGLYCEMIA (Low blood sugar) Causes: Too little food, too much insulin or diabetes pills; more active than usual WHAT YOU CAN DO! • Test blood sugar • If over 250 mg/dl for several tests, CALL YOUR DOCTOR S Y M P T O M S : S Y M P T O M S : EXTREME THIRST FREQUENT URINATION HUNGER NAUSEA BLURRED VISION SHAKYDIZZY SWEATING HEADACHE FAST HEARTBEAT WHAT YOU CAN DO! • Check your • blood sugar • Eat something based on your sugar levels and recommendations from your diabetic care team • Check again after consuming H5779_DiabInfograhic_CY17_NM This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Please speak to your provider if you have any questions. (HMO) MeridianCare HMO is a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in MeridianCare HMO depends on contract renewal. ATTENTION: If you speak English, language assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call 1-877-902-6784 (TTY: 711). ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su di Continue reading >>

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