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Serum Glucose

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Glucose: Reference Range, Interpretation, Collection And Panels

Postprandial plasma glucose at 2 hours: Less than 140 mg/dL Random plasma glucose: Less than 140 mg/dL Serum glucose values are 1.15% lower than plasma glucose values. [ 1 ] Values for diabetes mellitus are as follows: Fasting plasma glucose: Greater than 125 mg/dL Random plasma glucose: Greater than 200 mg/dL Postprandial glucose at 2 hours: Greater than 200 mg/dL Impaired fasting glucose: Fasting glucose of 100-125 mg/dL Impaired glucose tolerance testing: Postprandial glucose at 2 hours of 140-200 mg/dL The value for hypoglycemia is as follows: Collect 0.5-1 ml of blood in gray-top tube containing sodium fluoride. For serum glucose, a red-top tube can be used. Serum is separated within 45 minutes of collection. For fasting glucose testing, collect the blood sample in the morning after an overnight or 8-hour fast. For postprandial glucose testing, collect the blood sample 2 hours after a regular meal. For oral glucose tolerance testing, after oral intake of 75 g of glucose, collect blood samples at 1 hour and 2 hours. For gestational diabetes testing, parameters are 1 hour after 50 g of glucose and 2 hours after 100 g of glucose. Glucose is a monosaccharide and is a primary meta Continue reading >>

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  1. zelack

    going in for a very brief surgery on monday, have never had surgery before. does anesthesia raise blood sugar? i am nervous cause i have to fast beforehand and don't have any experience with that or how to manage my bgl, and before out of commission for 2 hours is daunting to a control freak like me.

  2. Catdancer

    Hey Zelack, I had some out patient surgery 2 months ago and had some of your fears. I am type 2 (don't know what you are) and I am controlling by exercise and diet. Anesthesia per say did not raise my bg's however the lactated ringers (d5w) IV and the stress of surgery did raise my readings for a few days post op. I am also a controll freak but in this instance I just had to sit back, relax and accept the situation. My bg readings gradually returned to pre surgery levels in about a week/ten days. Just takes a bit of patience.

  3. NoraWI

    If you don't insist on a saline solution IV, they'll give you glucose. Surgery won't raise BG but the anesthetist, who monitors your BG while you are under, can. Voice your concern and insist that s/he NOT raise your BG to 200. They feel more comfortable when you are high. You don't. You should have talked with your doctor about this.

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[fasting Serum Glucose And Subsequent Liver Cancer Risk In A Korean Prospectivecohort].

1. J Prev Med Public Health. 2007 Jan;40(1):23-8. [Fasting serum glucose and subsequent liver cancer risk in a Korean prospectivecohort]. Gwack J(1), Hwang SS, Ko KP, Jun JK, Park SK, Chang SH, Shin HR, Yoo KY. (1)Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine. OBJECTIVES: Chronic infections with hepatitis B or C and alcoholic cirrhosis are three well-known major risk factors for liver cancer. Diabetes has also beensuggested as a potential risk factor. However, the findings of previous studieshave been controversial in terms of the causal association. Therefore, the aim ofthis study was to evaluate the association between serum glucose levels and livercancer development in a Korean cohort.METHODS: Thirty-six liver cancer cases were identified in the Korean Multi-CenterCancer Cohort (KMCC). Baseline information on lifestyle characteristics wasobtained via questionnaire. Serum glucose levels were measured at the study'senrollment. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using a Cox proportional hazardregression model. The adjusting variables included age, gender, smoking history, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Lonie

    My 12 hour fasting glucose ranges anywhere from 115 to 135, the higher levels generally a direct result of poor eating the night before. At what point should you be seriously concerned about your maintenance level as everyone is different? I know where the doctors want us to be but is it possible that some of us just process slowly and really never develop full blown type 2 diabetes?
    ** This is from my husband; we are still trying to get him logged in as a separate user! ;-)
    Carol
    Remicade - will have my 30th infusion on September 2

  2. Jeannie143

    Anything over 100 to 110 is something to be very concerned about in anyone. I did the low level numbers for years, before they lowered the cutoff point, and I have the eye, kidney and neuropathy damages to show for it.
    If you want to get up close and personal about what is going on do your blood draw two hours after the beginning of each meal for a few days. Anything above 150 two hours after a meal is doing permanent damage to your kidneys, blood vessels in your eyes, the nerves in your fingers and feet and the whole network of blood vessels in your body. Diabetes is more than just high sugar numbers. It actually changes the physiology of the cells in your circulatory system. This is one of the reasons that diabetics have higher incidences of stroke and heart attacks.
    If hubby went to my doctor he would already be considered full blown diabetic.
    ~ Jeannie, Forum Moderator/Diabetes & Fibromyalgia
    I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. ~Mother Teresa
    "People are like stained glass windows: They sparkle and shine when the sun's out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within."- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

  3. Lanie G

    Read everything Jeannie says. For many many years the ADA had parameters that accepted fasting between 100 and 125 as "prediabetic", and unfortunately the millions of people who fell into that range didn't take this as significant. For several years I was in that range until finally my doctor prescribed a blood sugar monitor. It was only then I could see what my blood sugar was any time of the day and I realized that I wasn't "pre" diabetic but I prefer to call 'mild diabetic'. That is, by diet and exercise I can keep my blood sugar to normal levels - and I don't mean what the ADA wants a diabetic to have but what a person who is not diabetic has. Diabetes develops differently and at different rates in people, so it's hard to say what to expect now or in a few years with your husband. If a fasting comes in at 127 after 12 hours of fasting, what was his blood sugar two hours after he ate? Imagine how how it was then. As Jeannie says, testing 2 hours after the beginning of a meal (called 'post prandial') is important because it tells you how quickly the body metabolizes carbohydrates - and it's the carbohydrates that cause high blood sugar. Having a fasting of 127 after 12 hours means he still have glucose running around his system and elevated levels for prolonged time is dangerous for all the organs as Jeanne says. Carol, please get your husband to come on and ask his questions. We don't bite the newbies, really!


    Lanie

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Effects Of Several Simple Sugars On Serum Glucose And Serum Fructose Levels In Normal And Diabetic Subjects.

Effects of several simple sugars on serum glucose and serum fructose levels in normal and diabetic subjects. Kim HS, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1988. Department of Food and Nutrition, Sookmyung Women's University, Korea. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1988 Apr 6;4(4):281-7. Fructose has a reaction constant 7.5 times as high as that of glucose in its nonenzymatic reaction with protein in vitro. The effects of glucose, sucrose and fructose ingestion on serum fructose and glucose levels were studied to evaluate the overall biohazard, i.e., the probability of their altering proteins while circulating in the blood. Normal and diabetic subjects were given either 75 g glucose, 75 g fructose, 75 g sucrose, or 112.5 g fructose after fasting, and their serum levels of sugars were measured at 0, 1, 2 and 3 h. In normal subjects, fructose ingestion produced significantly lower serum glucose levels and significantly higher serum fructose levels than did glucose ingestion, while sucrose produced intermediate results. The glycemic effect was found to be lowest for fructose and highest for glucose. The calculated overall biohazard was, however, highest for fructose and lowest for glucose in normal Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. spotty

    Is it possible for A1C to go lower in a month?

    I'm 27 & on October 29, my doctor gave me a A1C test & said I was pre-diabetes with 5.9. I took it extremely serious but now I feel like I'm going crazy worrying about getting it lower. I'm the first to admit that I had a massive sweet tooth, I couldn't go a day without having some kind of chocolate. I'm 5'6 & was 143 when he diagnosed me. I immediately cut out all sweets, junk, and refined sugar. I've been watching my diet & excercised every chance I could. I'm doing Tae Bo Advanced 6 days a week for 45 minutes & running 3 days a week for 30 minutes in addition to that. That along with dieting helped me drop 12 pounds so far.
    I do understand that the A1C is measured every 3 months, so I can't even bother getting tested for this again for 2 more months. The thing is though, I can't help but obsess about getting it lower. I tried asking my doctor but he told me I was worrying too much & to not concern myself until I'm able to test again (it's not easy to not think about though) I know it's only December 1 but I can't help but wonder though if it's possibly, it could have possibly gone down even just a tiny bit? I just cant help but obsessively worry about this

  2. smorgan

    I think he's right and you're worrying too much. But, yes, A1C can change in that short a period. It measures conditions for 3 months, but is heavily weighted in favor of the last 2 or 3 weeks.
    If you can't stop obsessing, just take $9.95 to Wal-Mart and buy a mail-in self-test. The 4 or 5 days to get the result may seem like an eternity but it's much less than 3 months. You can do that as often as you like.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by spotty
    I'm 27 & on October 29, my doctor gave me a A1C test & said I was pre-diabetes with 5.9. I took it extremely serious but now I feel like I'm going crazy worrying about getting it lower. I'm the first to admit that I had a massive sweet tooth, I couldn't go a day without having some kind of chocolate. I'm 5'6 & was 143 when he diagnosed me. I immediately cut out all sweets, junk, and refined sugar. I've been watching my diet & excercised every chance I could. I'm doing Tae Bo Advanced 6 days a week for 45 minutes & running 3 days a week for 30 minutes in addition to that. That along with dieting helped me drop 12 pounds so far.
    I do understand that the A1C is measured every 3 months, so I can't even bother getting tested for this again for 2 more months. The thing is though, I can't help but obsess about getting it lower. I tried asking my doctor but he told me I was worrying too much & to not concern myself until I'm able to test again (it's not easy to not think about though) I know it's only December 1 but I can't help but wonder though if it's possibly, it could have possibly gone down even just a tiny bit? I just cant help but obsessively worry about this

  3. Spunky

    To answer your question, here is a recent post by someone who lowered her bg in 3 days: I believe !
    Your A1c of 5.9 means your average blood glucose (bg) for the past 3 months was about 123, which ain't half bad. Many diabetics would kill to get their A1c into the 5% range.
    I am also prediabetic, that is why my doc wouldn't give me a prescription for a meter and test strips, so I went to Walmart and bought my own... ReliOn brand. That's about as cheap as you can get them. You should be keeping tabs on your bg. That way you won't have to wonder if it is going up or down, you'll know. I test my fasting bg first thing in the morning. Also 1 hr. after meals to see how high that meal takes my bg, then an hour after that to see if my bg has gone higher or lower. Ideally it would be lower, but it could go either way, depending on what I eat.
    It is good that you cut out sweets, junk, and refined sugar because carbs are the main thing that cause bg to rise. Just keep in mind that almost everything has carbs in it, so be sure to read nutrition labels. If you want to know what most of us diabetics do and don't eat, check out LCHF for beginners | Dietdoctor.com If you eat something that takes your bg too high, cut it out of your diet. Us prediabetics and type 2's have to eat to our meters because everyone is different.
    Check out the recipe section of the forum so you can satisfy that sweet tooth and maybe even get your chocolate fix.
    Welcome to the forum.

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